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Understand, (impf. and partic. understood) 1) to perceive the meaning of, to comprehend: Tp. II, 1, 268. Gent. II, 5, 25. Gent. II, 5, 25 Gent. II, 5, 25 Gent. II, 5, 25 Wiv. I, 1, 140. Wiv. I, 1, 140 Wiv. I, 1, 140 II, 2, 133. II, 2, 133 Err. II, 1, 49. Err. II, 1, 49 II, 2, 153. IV, 3, 21. Ado V, 1, 234. LLL IV, 2, 101. V, 1, 158. V, 2, 762. V, 2, 762 Mids. III, 2, 236. Merch. I, 2, 74. I, 3, 16. III, 2, 7. III, 5, 63. As III, 3, 12. Shr. I, 1, 240. All's I, 1, 69. All's I, 1, 69 II, 2, 72. II, 3, 198. IV, 1, 4. IV, 1, 4 IV, 1, 4 IV, 3, 123. Tw. I, 5, 286. III, 1, 60. III, 1, 60 III, 1, 60 Wint. I, 2, 229. III, 2, 81. IV, 4, 684. John III, 3, 63. IV, 2, 237. R2 V, 3, 124. H4A III, 1, 119. H4A III, 1, 119 H4A III, 1, 119 H4A III, 1, 119 H5 I, 2, 266. III, 6, 52. V, 2, 135. V, 2, 135 H6B I, 4, 75. H8 V, 3, 72. Troil. III, 1, 29. IV, 5, 240. V, 10, 11. Cor. IV, 7, 17. Tit. III, 1, 143. Tim. I, 1, 51. IV, 3, 316. Caes. I, 2, 285. Mcb. I, 3, 43. III, 4, 124 “(augurs and understood relations).” Hml. I, 3, 96 “(you do not u. yourself so clearly).” III, 2, 365. IV, 1, 2. IV, 2, 24. V, 1, 41. V, 2, 131. Lr. I, 2, 43. I, 4, 260. II, 4, 100. Oth. I, 2, 52. IV, 2, 32. V, 2, 153. Ant. V, 2, 75. Cymb. II, 3, 80. Per. IV, 2, 133.
The gerund substantively: “their --ing begins to swell,” Tp. V, 79 (they begin to perceive, to become conscious of, their situation). “hast thou no --ings for thy cases,” Wiv. IV, 1, 72 (Evans' speech). “for thy more sweet --ing,” LLL I, 1, 267 (that thou mayst better understand. Armado's letter). “to thy better --ing,” As V, 1, 57. H5 V, 2, 126. H6C II, 6, 60. Hml. I, 2, 250 “(give it an --ing, but no tongue).” II, 2, 9 (from the --ing of himself).
Absol., == to have the faculty of perception and discernment, to be wise and judicious: “now let us u.” Wiv. I, 1, 138 (Evans' speech). “and u. again like honest men,” H8 I, 3, 32. The partic. adjectively: “was this taken by any --ing pate but thine?” Wint. I, 2, 223. “will leave us never an --ing friend,” Wint. I, 2, 223.
The gerund substantively == intellectual faculty, judgment: “a man's good wit seconded with the forward child --ing,” As III, 3, 14. “I am only old in judgment and --ing,” H4B I, 2, 215. “I had thought I had had men of some --ing and wisdom of my council,” H8 V, 3, 135. “an --ing simple and unschooled,” Hml. I, 2, 97.
2) to interpret mentally, to conceive with respect to meaning: figuring that they their passions likewise lent me of grief and blushes, aptly understood in bloodless “white and the encrimsoned mood,” Compl. 200. what must we u. by this (a bloody napkin)? As IV, 3, 95. “on the winking of authority to u. a law,” John IV, 2, 212.
3) to hear, to be told, to learn: “--ing that the curate and yourself are good at such eruptions,” LLL V, 1, 119. “you must u. he goes but to see a noise,” Mids. III, 1, 93. “I u. moreover upon the Rialto he hath a third at Mexico,” Merch. I, 3, 19. “your grace shall u. that . . . I am very sick,” IV, 1, 150. “give me your hand and let me all your fortunes u.” As II, 7, 200. “u. you this of me,” Shr. I, 2, 259. “my suit, as I do u., you know,” All's V, 3, 160. “but by bad courses may be understood that their events can never fall out good,” R2 II, 1, 213. “as more at large your grace shall u.” H6B II, 1, 177. “you shall u. from me her mind,” R3 IV, 4, 429. “the king shall u. it presently,” H8 V, 2, 10. “u. more clear,” Troil. IV, 5, 165. “he --s you are in arms,” Tit. V, 1, 158. “as I u. how all things go,” Tim. III, 6, 20. “you shall u. what hath befallen,” Oth. V, 2, 307. “since my landing I have understood your lord has . . .,” Per. I, 3, 34.
To give to u. == to tell, to inform: “if you give me directly to u. you have prevailed,” Cymb. I, 4, 171. “here I give to u.” Per. III, 2, 68. to be given to u. == to be told, to be informed: Merch. II, 8, 7. As I, 1, 130. H4A IV, 4, 11. to have to u. == to learn, to be informed: “and as I further have to u., is new committed to the Bishop of York,” H6C IV, 4, 10. to let u. == to tell, to inform: Wiv. II, 2, 171. Meas. III, 2, 144. Shr. IV, 2, 115. H6C V, 4, 33. to make u., in the same sense: Meas. III, 2, 255. Tim. II, 2, 43.
4) to know: “we u. it, and thank heaven for it,” All's II, 3, 71. “he takes on him to u. so much,” Tw. I, 5, 149. “you are well understood to be a perfecter giber,” Cor. II, 1, 90. to let and to make u. == to let know: “to make you u. this in a manifested effect, I crave but four days' respite,” Meas. IV, 2, 169. “and let ourselves again but u. that as it more concerns the Turk than Rhodes, so may he with more facile question bear it,” Oth. I, 3, 21.
The gerund substantively == knowledge: “the assault that Angelo hath made to you, fortune hath conveyed to my --ing,” Meas. III, 1, 190. “I speak as my --ing instructs me,” Wint. I, 1, 20. “I speak in --ing; you are, I know it,” Lr. IV, 5, 28.
The partic. adjectively: “or nicely charge your--ing soul with opening titles miscreate,” H5 I, 2, 15 (== knowing better).
5) For the sake of quibbling, in a quite physical sense, == to stand under sth.: “my staff --s me,” Gent. II, 5, 28; cf. “my legs do better u. me than I u. what you mean,” Tw. III, 1, 89. “I scarce could u. it,” Err. II, 1, 49.
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