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Wild, 1) not tame, not domestic: Ven. 560. Sonn. 102, 11. Ado III, 1, 35. Ado III, 1, 35 Merch. V, 71. Shr. II, 279. H4A IV, 1, 103. H8 V, 3, 22. Cor. III, 2, 2. In the following passages adj. and subst. hyphened by some Edd.: “w. boars,” Ant. II, 2, 183. “sleeps by day more than the w. cat,” Merch. II, 5, 48. Shr. I, 2, 197. Oth. II, 1, 111. “a w. duck,” H4A II, 2, 108. IV, 2, 21. “w. fowl,” Mids. III, 1, 33. Tw. IV, 2, 55. “my taxing like a w. goose flies,” As II, 7, 86. Rom. II, 4, 76. “w. geese,” Mids. III, 2, 20. H4A II, 4, 152. H4B V, 1, 79. Lr. II, 4, 46. “if thy wits run the w. goose chase, I have done,” Rom. II, 4, 75 (Dyce: a kind of horse-race: two horses were started together, and whichever rider could get the lead, the other was obliged to follow him over whatever ground the foremost jockey chose to go).*
2) growing without culture: Mids. II, 1, 249. Wint. IV, 4, 93. H5 III, 5, 7. Cymb. IV, 2, 390.
3) uncultivated, uninhabited, desert: “to trace the forests w.” Mids. II, 1, 25. As V, 4, 165. “high w. hills,” R2 II, 3, 4. “a little fire in a w. field,” Lr. III, 4, 117.
4) savage, atrocious, sanguinary: Lucr. 980. Mids. II, 1, 228. Mids. II, 1, 228 V, 225. John IV, 3, 48. V, 2, 74. H4A V, 2, 11. H4B IV, 5, 132. H6B V, 2, 59. Mcb. II, 4, 1<*>.
5) turbulent, tempestuous: “w. waves,” Ven. 819. “the w. waters,” Tp. I, 2, 2. Tp. I, 2, 2 Gent. II, 7, 32. Err. II, 1, 21. Merch. V, 11. H4B I, 1, 154. H5 III, 1, 14. H8 II, 4, 200. III, 2, 198. Troil. I, 1, 105. Mcb. IV, 2, 21. “a w. night,” Lr. II, 4, 311. In a moral sense, == violently agitated: “the times are w.” H4B I, 1, 9. H8 V, 1, 15. “in w. hurry,” Cor. IV, 6, 4. “while men's minds are w.” Hml. V, 2, 405. “in a town of war, yet w.” Oth. II, 3, 214.
6) ungoverned, licentious: “the w. prince and Poins,” Wiv. III, 2, 74. “my w. societies,” III, 4, 8. Meas. IV, 3, 19. Merch. II, 2, 190. Merch. II, 2, 190 H4A V, 2, 72. H4B V, 2, 123.* H5 I, 2, 267. Hml. II, 1, 18. Hml. II, 1, 18 Cymb. I, 6, 103.
Sometimes not a term of reproach, == wanton, frolicsome: “youth is w. and age is tame,” Pilgr. 164. “our w. faction,” Gent. IV, 1, 37. “pretty and witty, w. and yet, too, gentle,” Err. III, 1, 110. “to move w. laughter in the throat of death,” LLL V, 2, 865. cf. Ado III, 1, 35. Merch. V, 71. H4A IV, 1, 103.
Adverbially: “if I chance to talk a little w., forgive me,” H8 I, 4, 26.
7) violent, carried headlong by passion: “w. rage,” H5 IV, 7, 82. “desperate, w. and furious,” R3 IV, 4, 169. “w. grief,” R3 IV, 4, 169 Rom. III, 3, 110. Tim. V, 1, 167. Tim. V, 1, 167 Ant. V, 2, 154.
8) rash, inconsiderate: “'twere most piteous to be w.” Wint. II, 1, 182. “a w. dedication of yourselves to unpathed waters,” IV, 4, 577. “this unheedful, desperate, w. adventure,” H6A IV, 4, 7. “a w. exposture to each chance,” Cor. IV, 1, 36.
9) bewildered, distracted, mad: “w. amazement,” John V, 1, 35. “your looks are pale and w.” Rom. V, 1, 28. V, 3, 240. “it almost turns my dangerous nature w.” Tim. IV, 3, 499 (dangerous perhaps == exposed to danger. Most M. Edd. mild). “w. and whirling words,” Hml. I, 5, 133.
10) wanting order and regularity, or quiet and composure in any manner; extravagant, inordinate, eccentric, fantastic, mad: “how like you this w. counsel, mighty states? smacks it not something of the policy?” John II, 395. “the irregular and w. Glendower,” H4A I, 1, 40. “like a w. Morisco,” H6B III, 1, 365. “in this w. action,” Troil. I, 3, 340. “so w. in their attire,” Mcb. I, 3, 40. “paragons description and w. fame,” Oth. II, 1, 62. “you w. bedfellow,” Ant. I, 2, 51. “the w. disguise,” II, 7, 131. “I am w. in my beholding,” Per. V, 1, 224.
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