previous next
Will, vb. I. regular verb; impf. and partic. pass. willed, partic. pres. willing; 1) to wish, to desire, to be for: “paying what ransom the insulter --eth,” Ven. 550. “much --ing to be counted wise,” LLL II, 18. “whose will still --s it should none spare,” LLL II, 18 “as w. the rest, so --eth Winchester,” H6A III, 1, 162. “what --s Lord Talbot pleaseth Burgundy,” III, 2, 130. “not --ing any longer conference,” H6C II, 2, 171. “the mother --s it so,” Tit. IV, 2, 82. Rom. III, 5, 24. “the gentleman --ing,” Hml. V, 2, 183. “wishes fall out as they're --ed,” Per. V, 2, 16.
Willing, adjectively, == a) desirous, pleased, inclined; and hence == forward, ready, prompt (cf. above: LLL II, 18. H6C II, 2, 171. Hml. V, 2, 183): “with a heart as --ing as bondage e'er of freedom,” Tp. III, 1, 88 (cf. Of). “I was as --ing to grapple,” LLL II, 218. “but one dead that is --ing to be so,” As I, 2, 201. “you will not extort from me what I am --ing to keep in,” Tw. II, 1, 14. “she is very --ing to bid you farewell,” II, 3, 108. “he shall conceal it whiles you are --ing it shall come to note,” IV, 3, 29 (== till you desire). “could be --ing to march on to Calais without impeachment,” H5 III, 6, 150. “if they be still and --ing, I'll undertake may see away their shilling,” H5 III, 6, 150. “--ing to leave their burthen,” IV, 2, 3. “they that most are --ing,” Cor. I, 6, 67. “I trouble thee too much, but thou art --ing,” Caes. IV, 3, 259. “most --ing spirits,” Cymb. IV, 2, 338. cf. Lucr. 1237. Sonn. 6, 6 (the --ing loan, i. e. readily and gladly given). Wiv. I, 4, 10. Meas. V, 542. As V, 4, 11. Shr. IV, 4, 34. Tw. III, 3, 11. R2 IV, 108. R2 IV, 108 R3 V, 3, 264. H8 III, 1, 49 (the --est sin, i. e. committed with the greatest eagerness). The adj., where the adv. would have been expected: “what you will have, I'll give, and --ing too,” R2 III, 3, 206 (with pleasure, gladly). “I'll send them all as --ing as I live,” H6B V, 1, 51. “most --ing, madam,” H8 IV, 2, 130. “the swallow follows not summer more --ing,” Tim. III, 6, 32.
b) pleased, contented, gratified: “he strays with --ing sport to the wild ocean,” Gent. II, 7, 32. “all pride is --ing pride,” LLL II, 36. “--ing misery outlives incertain pomp, is crowned before,” Tim. IV, 3, 242.
c) complying, consenting, voluntary: “like a --ing patient, I will drink potions of eisel,” Sonn. 111, 9. “not without the prince be --ing,” Ado III, 3, 86. “what --ing ransom he will give,” H5 III, 5, 63. “a --ing bondman,” Caes. I, 3, 113. “we have --ing dames enough,” Mcb. IV, 3, 73.
2) to dispose, to determine: “what so poor a man as Hamlet is may do, . . . God --ing, shall not lack,” Hml. I, 5, 186.
3) to order, to bid: “he --ed me in heedfullest reservation to bestow them,” All's I, 3, 230 (== he ordered by testament? cf. the following passage). “at Worcester must his body be interred, for so he --ed it,” John V, 7, 100. “God's mother --ed me to leave my base vocation,” H6A I, 2, 80. “we do no otherwise than we are --ed,” I, 3, 10. “who --ed you?” I, 3, 10 “would they speak with me? They --ed me say so,” H8 III, 1, 18.
4) to invite, to summon: “he --s you . . . that you divest yourself,” H5 II, 4, 77. “--ing you overlook this pedigree,” H5 II, 4, 77 “he craves a parley, . . . --ing you to demand your hostages,” Tit. V, 1, 160.
5) to require: “it shall be to him then, as our good --s, a sure destruction,” Cor. II, 1, 258. “what custom --s, in all things should we do't,” II, 3, 125.
II. irregular verb; 2d pers. pres. wilt, 3d pers. will; impf. would. Often contracted to one syllable with the preceding pronoun: I'll (O. Edd. usually Ile), thou'lt (O. Edd. sometimes thou't), he'll, she'll, we'll, you'll, they'll; I'ld, he'ld, she'ld, you'ld. Wilt thou or wouldst thou contracted to wo't or “woo't:” H4B II, 1, 63. Hml. V, 1, 298. Ant. IV, 2, 7. IV, 15, 59. would for “wouldst:” Wiv. II, 2, 31. H5 V, 2, 174. Tit. III, 1, 210 (Ff wilt). thou't for “thou wouldst” Cor. I, 9, 2.
1) to have a mind, to desire; followed by an infinitive expressed or understood: “one for interest, if thou wilt have twain,” Ven. 210. “feed where thou wilt,” Ven. 210 “I know not love, nor will not know it,” Ven. 210 “'tis much to borrow, and I will not owe it,” Ven. 210 “he will not manage her,” Ven. 210 “if thou needs wilt hunt,” Ven. 210 “he needs will be absolute Milan,” Tp. I, 2, 108. “I am your wife, if you will marry me,” III, 1, 83. III, 1, 83 Gent. I, 1, 11. II, 7, 63. As II, 5, 20. All's II, 1, 73. R3 I, 4, 95 etc. etc. cf. woo't above. Impf. would as indicative (== volui): “the lion walked along behind some hedge, because he would not fear him,” Ven. 1094. “not to be tempted, would she be immured,” Compl. 251. “for one thing she did they would not take her life,” Tp. I, 2, 267. “you may thank yourself . . . that would not bless our Europe with your daughter,” II, 1, 124. “I fear my Julia would not deign my lines, receiving them from such a worthless post,” Gent. I, 1, 160. “what a fool is she, that knows I am a maid and would not force the letter to my view,” I, 2, 54. “he would not, but by gift of my chaste body . . ., release my brother,” Meas. V, 97. “why I . . . would not rather make rash remonstrance of my hidden power,” Meas. V, 97 “she that would be your wife now ran from you,” Err. IV, 4, 152. “heaven would that she these gifts should have,” As III, 2, 161 etc. I will rather and I would rather see sub “Rather” As III, 2, 161
Would as subjunctive (vellem); expressing a present wish in a conditional form: “backward she pushed him, as she would be thrust,” Ven. 41. “now she weeps, and now she fain would speak,” Ven. 41 “she would, he will not in her arms be bound,” Ven. 41 for one sweet look thy “help I would assure thee,” Ven. 41 “he hath won what he would lose again,” Lucr. 688. “and now she would the caged cloister fly,” Compl. 249. “now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground,” Tp. I, 1, 69. “I would fain die a dry death,” Tp. I, 1, 69 “I would have sunk the sea within the earth or ere . . .,” I, 2, 10. “he would be king on't,” II, 1, 156. “a foul bombard that would shed his liquor,” II, 2, 22. “I would not for the world,” V, 173. “you'ld be king o'the isle,” V, 173 “I rather would entreat thy company,” Gent. I, 1, 5. “love still and thrive therein, even as I would when I to love begin,” Gent. I, 1, 5 “which they would have the profferer construe 'Ay',” I, 2, 56. “when willingly I would have had her here,” I, 2, 56 “to plead for that which I would not obtain,” IV, 4, 105. “I would have been a breakfast to the beast rather than . . .,” V, 4, 34. “from which we would not have you warp,” Meas. I, 1, 15. “which princes, would they, may not disannul,” Err. I, 1, 145. “I would see his own person,” LLL I, 1, 185 etc. Followed by an infinitive of the perfect, to express an intention not carried into execution: “it cannot be that so much guile, she would have said, can lurk in such a look,” Lucr. 1535 (== she was going to say). “their antique pen would have expressed even such a beauty as you master now,” Sonn. 106, 7 (== meant or intended to express). “who . . . would here have killed your king,” Tp. V, 78. “you would all this time have proved there is no time for all things,” Err. II, 2, 101. “they would have stolen away,” Mids. IV, 1, 161 etc. With the infinitive of the present, on the other hand, often quite == will (in the sense of wish): “your father would speak with you,” Gent. II, 4, 116. “when would you use it?” III, 1, 123. “there's some great matter she'ld employ me in,” IV, 3, 3. “would you speak with me?” Wiv. II, 2, 161. “we would, and we would not,” Meas. IV, 4, 37. “if you would know your wronger, look on me,” Ado V, 1, 271. “to wed Demetrius, as he would,” Mids. I, 1, 88. “what wouldst thou have with me?” H4A II, 3, 98. “if thou would have such a one, take me,” H5 V, 2, 174. “would thou kneel with me?” Tit. III, 1, 210 (Ff wilt). “he would be crowned,” Caes. II, 1, 12 etc.
Will and would governing an accusative: “that I will,” Tp. V, 294. “what I will, I will,” Gent. I, 3, 65. “I will none of them,” II, 1, 133. “I'll no pullet-sperm in my brewage,” Wiv. III, 5, 32. “we'll none of that,” Mids. V, 46. “will you any wife?” Shr. I, 1, 56. “will you any thing with it?” All's I, 1, 177. “you will my noble grapes,” II, 1, 74. “I'll no more drumming,” IV, 3, 331. “what greeting will you to my Lord Lafeu?” IV, 3, 331 “she'll none of me,” Tw. I, 3, 113. Tw. I, 3, 113 “I'll no more of you,” I, 5, 45. “I'll no more with thee,” III, 1, 48. “you'll nothing to my lord by me?” III, 1, 48 “I'll no gainsaying,” Wint. I, 2, 19. “what your highness will,” John IV, 2, 39. “I'll no swaggerers,” H4B II, 4, 81. “I will none of you,” III, 2, 271. “she will none,” Rom. III, 5, 140. “I will no reconcilement,” Hml. V, 2, 258. “we'll no defence,” Cymb. III, 4, 81 etc. Likewise would, but only in the sense of vellem (I should wish, I wish): “what would my potent master?” Tp. IV, 34. Gent. I, 2, 66. “what would you with her, if that I be she?” IV, 4, 115 (what's your business with her?). “what would thou more of man?” Wiv. II, 2, 31 (most M. Edd. wouldst). “what would you with her?” IV, 5, 30. III, 4, 63. Ado III, 5, 1. “what wouldst?” LLL I, 1, 183. “nothing becomes him ill that he would well,” II, 46. “what would these strangers?” V, 2, 174. V, 2, 174 V, 2, 174 “is he yet possessed how much ye would?” Merch. I, 3, 66. “wouldst thou aught with me?” II, 2, 128. II, 2, 128 II, 9, 85. As III, 2, 316. Tw. IV, 1, 44. John I, 1. IV, 2, 38. H4B IV, 4, 18. H5 IV, 1, 32 “(I would no other company).” V, 2, 68 “(if you would the peace).” H6A IV, 2, 5 “(and thus he would: open your city gates).” H6B I, 3, 11. II, 3, 21 “(sorrow would solace and mine age would ease).” Troil. III, 3, 17 “(what wouldst thou of us?).” Troil. III, 3, 17 Hml. III, 4, 104. IV, 4, 5. Lr. I, 4, 12. Oth. I, 3, 248. IV, 1, 261. Cymb. III, 1, 1. V, 5, 108. Per. I, 3, 6 etc.
I would optatively, followed by a subjunctive: “I would the lightning had burnt up those logs,” Tp. III, 1, 16. “I would I knew his mind,” Gent. I, 2, 33. Gent. I, 2, 33 Gent. I, 2, 33 IV, 2, 64. As I, 2, 243 etc. “I would, not so,” Tp. III, 1, 61 (== I were not a king). “I would to heaven I had your potency,” Meas. II, 2, 67. John III, 4, 48. IV, 1, 23. “I would to God my heart were flint,” R3 I, 3, 140. II, 1, 74. IV, 1, 59 (Ff O would) etc. I omitted: “would thou wert as I am,” Ven. 369. “O would thou hadst not,” Ven. 369 Tp. I, 2, 349. II, 1, 107. Gent. I, 2, 104. Meas. III, 2, 189. IV, 4, 35. V, 190. Err. IV, 4, 69 “(where would you had remained).” LLL IV, 3, 123. Mids. II, 1, 59. Merch. III, 1, 93. IV, 1, 296. V, 144. All's I, 2, 52. H6B II, 1, 38. H6C I, 1, 216. R3 I, 2, 151 etc.
Might in the optative clause: “would I might triumph so,” Pilgr. 236. “would thou mightst lie drowning,” Tp. I, 1, 60. I, 2, 168. Gent. IV, 4, 176. Wiv. I, 1, 156. IV, 5, 95. R2 V, 3, 4. Troil. I, 1, 117 “(if 'would I might' were 'may').” Rom. III, 5, 87.
Would in the optative clause: “I would my valiant master would destroy thee,” Tp. III, 2, 53. “I would my husband would meet him,” Wiv. IV, 2, 86. “would that alone he would detain,” Err. II, 1, 107. “would he would change,” Mids. V, 255. “I would it would make you invisible,” Tw. III, 1, 34. “would half my wealth would buy this for a lie,” Cor. IV, 6, 160. Similarly: “I wish mine eyes would . . . shut up my thoughts,” Tp. II, 1, 192. “I could wish he would modestly examine himself,” Ado II, 3, 215. “entreats thou wouldst vouchsafe to visit her poor castle,” H6A II, 2, 40. “the king's request that I would visit you,” H8 IV, 2, 116. “my next petition is that his noble grace would have some pity . . .,” H8 IV, 2, 116 “wish that warmer days would come,” Cymb. II, 4, 6. Hence the wish itself expressed by would: “O that our fathers would applaud our loves!” Gent. I, 3, 48. “O that your frowns would teach my smiles such skill!” Mids. I, 1, 195. “now my soul's palace is become a prison: ah, would she break from hence!” H6C II, 1, 75. “O that my death would stay these ruthful deeds!” II, 5, 95. “would the nobility lay aside their ruth!” Cor. I, 1, 201.
2) to claim, to pretend: “then reason will our hearts should be as good,” H4B IV, 1, 157. “this is a riddling merchant for the nonce: he will be here, and yet he is not here,” H6A II, 3, 58 (he pretends to be here; German: er will hier sein). “art thou king and wilt be forced?” H6C I, 1, 230 (pretendest, pleadest as an excuse, to have been forced). “her mood will needs be pitied,” Hml. IV, 5, 3 (claims pity). “that would be scanned,” III, 3, 75.
3) Denoting not so much a wish or purpose as mere readiness or likelihood: “wink again, and I will wink,” Ven. 122. “I will enchant thine ear,” Ven. 122 “she, by her good will, will never rise, so he will kiss her still,” Ven. 122 “if you will say so, you shall have a kiss,” Ven. 122 “whose vulture thought doth pitch the price so high that she will draw his lips' rich treasure dry,” Ven. 122 “you will fall again into your idle theme,” Ven. 122 “my heart . . . will not let a false sound enter,” Ven. 122 “if thou wilt deign this favour, . . . a thousand secrets shalt thou know,” Ven. 122 if thou wilt “chide, thy lips shall never open,” Ven. 122 “he hath neither Latin, French, nor Italian, and you will come into the court and swear that I have a poor pennyworth in the English,” Merch. I, 2, 75 etc. etc. Often almost periphrastical: “gazing upon a late-embarked friend, till the wild waves will have him seen no more,” Ven. 819. “abhorred slave, which any print of goodness wilt not take,” Tp. I, 2, 352. “I'll warrant him for drowning,” I, 1, 49. “will you grant with me that Ferdinand is drowned?” II, 1, 243. “they'll nor pinch nor . . ., unless he bid 'em,” II, 2, 4. “if it will please you to show us so much gentry,” Hml. II, 2, 21. “when we were boys, who would believe that there were . . .,” Tp. III, 3, 44 (which in the present would be: I'll believe). “as much love in rhyme as would be crammed up in a sheet of paper,” LLL V, 2, 7. cf. the following passages: “who was so firm that this coil would not infect his reason?” Tp. I, 2, 208. “he wondered that your lordship would suffer him to spend his youth at home,” Gent. I, 3, 5. “and would you take the letter of her?” All's III, 4, 1.
It will not be == all is in vain, it is to no effect: “but all in vain; good queen, it will not be,” Ven. 607. “I pray you, leave me. Ho! now you strike like the blind man: 'twas the boy that stole your meat, and you'll beat the post. If it will not be, I'll leave you,” Ado II, 1, 208 (if you will not leave me at my request). “it will not be: retire into your trenches,” H6A I, 5, 33. will it not be? an expression of impatience: “will't not be? will not a calf's-skin stop that mouth of thine?” John III, 1, 298. “madam, madam! ay, let the county take you in your bed; he'll fright you up, i'faith; will it not be? what, dressed!” Rom. IV, 5, 11.
We will == let us: “some dark deep desert . . . will we find out,” Lucr. 1146. “we'll visit Caliban,” Tp. I, 2, 308. “we will inherit here,” II, 2, 179. “the next advantage will we take throughly,” III, 3, 14. “now will we break with him,” Gent. I, 3, 44. “why, then, we'll make exchange,” II, 2, 6. “we'll hear him. Ay, by my beard, will we,” IV, 1, 9. IV, 1, 9 Wiv. III, 3, 209. IV, 2, 96. Meas. IV, 5, 12. Err. V, 128. Err. V, 128 Ado I, 1, 161. V, 3, 31. LLL V, 1, 85. V, 2, 127. Mids. II, 2, 37. III, 1, 5. V, 407. Merch. IV, 1, 456. V, 55. Shr. II, 112. V, 2, 69 “(shall win the wager which we will propose).” H4B I, 1, 186. H6A I, 2, 18. III, 2, 12. H6B II, 1, 200. V, 1, 55. H6C III, 1, 1. IV, 6, 97. R3 IV, 1, 11. Hml. I, 5, 156. Ant. III, 2, 38 etc.
As denoting what may be expected, sometimes equivalent to may: “I am resolved on two points. That if one break, the other will hold,” Tw. I, 5, 26. “in fierce tempest is he coming, that, if requiring fail, he will compel,” H5 II, 4, 101. “hath begg'd that I will stay at home to-day,” Caes. II, 2, 82. And in the following phrases: “in my heart lie there what hidden woman's fear there will,” As I, 3, 121. “come what will,” H4A I, 2, 162. “be what thou wilt,” H6A V, 3, 45. H8 II, 1, 65. V, 3, 47. “speed how it will,” Cor. V, 1, 61. “come Pentecost as quickly as it will,” Rom. I, 5, 38. “let shame say what it will,” Hml. IV, 7, 189. “what will hap more tonight,” Lr. III, 6, 121.
The idea of probability passing into that of use and custom: “rain added to a river that is rank will force it overflow his bank,” Ven. 72. “love is a spirit all compact of fire . . . and will aspire,” Ven. 72 Ven. 72 “men will kiss even by their own direction,” Ven. 72 “being ireful, on the lion he will venture,” Ven. 72 “when they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian,” Tp. II, 2, 33. “sometimes a thousand twangling instruments will hum about mine ears,” III, 2, 147. “which . . . each putter-out . . . will bring us good warrant of,” III, 3, 48. “she will often praise her liquor,” Gent. III, 1, 350. “the man doth fear God, howsoever it seems not in him by some large jests he will make,” Ado II, 3, 206. “if a man will make courtesy and say nothing, he is virtuous,” H4B II, 1, 135. “grow like savages, as soldiers will that nothing do but meditate on blood,” H5 V, 2, 59. Gent. II, 1, 11. III, 1, 393. Meas. I, 2, 190. Ado II, 3, 115. As IV, 3, 159. Shr. II, 250. Tw. I, 2, 33. H6B III, 1, 14. R3 III, 1, 126 etc. “the tiger would be tame and gently hear him,” Ven. 1096. “some would sing, some other . . . would bring him mulberries,” Ven. 1096 1087--1092. “when virtue bragged, beauty would blush for shame,” Lucr. 54. Tp. I, 2, 198. Tp. I, 2, 198 Tp. I, 2, 198 Tp. I, 2, 198 II, 2, 53. III, 2, 150. Meas. III, 2, 136. Err. II, 2, 115. Ado III, 1, 61. Mids. II, 1, 132. As III, 2, 435. All's I, 2, 52. Wint. IV, 4, 58. H8 IV, 1, 78. Tim. II, 2, 143. Hml. I, 2, 143. II, 2, 381. Oth. I, 3, 146. Ant. I, 5, 33 etc.
4) Used, in the first as well as in the second and third persons, to form the future tense: “there shall not be one minute in an hour wherein I will not kiss my sweet love's flower,” Ven. 1188. “if you can command these elements to silence, we will not hand a rope more,” Tp. I, 1, 25. “his daughter and I will be king and queen,” III, 2, 115. “I will thrive,” Wiv. I, 3, 21. “we will thrive, lads, we will thrive,” Wiv. I, 3, 21 “perchance I will be there as soon as you,” Err. IV, 1, 39. “an bad thinking do not wrest true speaking, I'll offend no body,” Ado III, 4, 34. “perhaps I will return immediately,” Merch. II, 5, 52. “to-morrow will we be married,” As V, 3, 2. “I will sooner have a beard grow in the palm of my hand than he shall get one on his cheek,” H4B I, 2, 23. “there's not a piece of feather in our host; good argument, I hope, we will not fly,” H5 IV, 3, 113. “there is no hope that ever I will stay, if the first hour I shrink,” H6A IV, 5, 30. “I'll do well yet,” Cor. IV, 1, 21. “I will gain nothing but my shame and the odd hits,” Hml. V, 2, 184. “perchance I will ne'er go home,” Oth. V, 2, 197. “we will yet do well,” Ant. III, 13, 188. “courtesies which I will be ever to pay,” Cymb. I, 4, 39. Instances of the 2nd and 3rd persons: Ven. 23. Ven. 23 Ven. 23 Ven. 23 Ven. 23 Tp. I, 2, 184. II, 1, 289. II, 2, 83. III, 2, 31. Gent. I, 1, 37. Tit. IV, 1, 117 etc. etc. you will, imperatively: “you'll leave your noise anon,” H8 V, 4, 1.
Would forming the conditional tense in all the three persons: “if I did think I were well awake, I'ld strive to tell you,” Tp. V, 230. “I would resort to her by night,” Gent. III, 1, 110. “I would be loath to turn them together,” Wiv. II, 1, 192. “I would turn her loose to him,” Wiv. II, 1, 192 “who I would be sorry should be thus foolishly lost,” Meas. I, 2, 195. “I would be glad to receive some instruction,” IV, 2, 18. “I would have thought,” Ado II, 3, 119. “I would be sorry,” Tw. III, 1, 44. “what wouldst thou think of me? I would think thee a most princely hypocrite,” H4B II, 2, 56. H4B II, 2, 56 “if I would stand against thee, would the reposal of any trust . . . in thee make thy words faithed?” Lr. II, 1, 70. cf. Wiv. II, 1, 60. Ado II, 3, 121. Mids. IV, 1, 16. Shr. Ind. 2, 128. Instances of the 2nd and 3rd persons in every page. NB. “would seem to have us make denial,” All's I, 2, 8. “as one would say,” Merch. II, 2, 134 (== as who should say, cf. “Shall). as who would say,” Tit. IV, 4, 20.
5) Will and would, in all their significations, joined with adverbs and prepositional expressions, to express motion or change of place, when modern usage would require will go, would go or the like: “her object will away,” Ven. 255. “now I will away,” Ven. 255 “now she will no further,” Ven. 255 “I'll to my book,” Tp. III, 1, 94. “that . . . will never out of my bones,” V, 283. “I'll to the alehouse,” Gent. II, 5, 8. “I'll after,” III, 1, 394. V, 2, 51. “I'll never to sea again,” Wiv. II, 1, 96. “will on,” II, 2, 176. “I will about it,” II, 2, 176 “I will to my honest knight,” III, 2, 88. “I'll in,” III, 3, 145. “we'll a birding,” III, 3, 145 “I'll to him,” IV, 4, 76. IV, 4, 76 Meas. I, 1, 68. I, 2, 196. I, 4, 85. II, 1, 246. II, 4, 177. III, 1, 276. IV, 3, 66. IV, 3, 66 V, 360. Err. I, 2, 104. III, 1, 114. III, 2, 189. V, 109. LLL IV, 2, 173. V, 2, 668. V, 2, 668 Mids. III, 2, 375. IV, 1, 114. V, 194. V, 194 Merch. II, 2, 85. IV, 1, 455. IV, 2, 2. As III, 2, 109. III, 3, 106. IV, 1, 163. IV, 1, 163 V, 2, 44. V, 4, 190. All's IV, 3, 91. R2 II, 1, 218. H6A I, 1, 152. H6A I, 1, 152 I, 3, 84. II, 1, 33. III, 1, 146. IV, 1, 109. V, 3, 167. H6B I, 1, 142. H6B I, 1, 142 H6C I, 1, 206. II, 5, 136. IV, 3, 3. V, 1, 110. V, 4, 21. R3 I, 1, 107. R3 I, 1, 107 I, 4, 97. II, 4, 66. III, 1, 138. Cor. II, 3, 157. Rom. III, 2, 141. Mcb. III, 4, 132. Mcb. III, 4, 132 Mcb. III, 4, 132 IV, 3, 136. Hml. II, 2, 449. Oth. V, 2, 219. Ant. II, 6, 134. IV, 14, 51 etc. “I would to Valentine,” Gent. IV, 3, 22. “we would unto the Holy Land,” H4B III, 1, 108. “he is very sick and would to bed,” H5 II, 1, 87. “there were wit in this head, an 'twould out,” Troil. III, 3, 256. “I'ld with thee,” Cor. IV, 1, 57.
Will substantively: “I am at war 'twixt will and will not,” Meas. II, 2, 33.
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: