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Winter, the cold season of the year: Lucr. 1255. Sonn. 5, 6. 56, 13. 97, 1. Tp. V, 16. Gent. II, 4, 163. Meas. II, 1, 136. Err. III, 2, 100 “(a Poland w.).” LLL V, 2, 901. Mids. II, 1, 101. Mids. II, 1, 101 Merch. III, 1, 66. As II, 3, 52. II, 5, 8. Shr. IV, 1, 24 (proverb: w. tames man, woman and beast). Wint. II, 1, 25. III, 2, 213. IV, 3, 4. IV, 4, 75. IV, 4, 75 IV, 4, 75 R2 V, 1, 40. H4B I, 3, 62. IV, 4, 34 “(as humorous as w.).” IV, 4, 34 H5 III, 3, 55. H6B I, 1, 81. II, 4, 3. H6C V, 2, 15. R3 II, 3, 33. Tit. III, 1, 20. Rom. I, 2, 28. Tim. III, 6, 33. IV, 3, 264. Lr. II, 4, 46. Ant. V, 2, 87. Cymb. IV, 2, 259. IV, 4, 30. Per. IV, 3, 50. Sometimes with the article in a general sense: “you are sure together, as the w. to foul weather,” As V, 4, 142. “the --'s cold,” Caes. I, 2, 99. Lr. II, 4, 69. John V, 7, 36. H5 III, 3, 55. Hml. V, 1, 239. Adjectively: “w. meads,” Lucr. 1218. “w. weather,” Pilgr. 159. “w. time,” Wiv. IV, 4, 30. “w. wind,” As II, 7, 174. “w. cricket,” Shr. IV, 3, 110. “w. showers,” Tim. II, 2, 180. The Anglos. gen. in the same sense: “--'s day,” Sonn. 13, 11. “the --'s wind,” As II, 1, 7. “a --'s night,” H6B III, 2, 335. H6C V, 5, 25. V, 7. V, 7 “at a --'s fire,” Mcb. III, 4, 65. “the present --'s state,” Cymb. II, 4, 5.
Pars pro toto, == year (as passed in a cheerless manner): “when forty --s shall besiege thy brow,” Sonn. 2, 1. Tp. I, 2, 296. Meas. III, 1, 76. LLL IV, 3, 242. Wint. V, 3, 50. R2 I, 3, 211. R2 I, 3, 211 R2 I, 3, 211 IV, 258.
Emblem of old age: “lust's w. comes ere summer half be done,” Ven. 802. “let not --'s ragged hand deface in thee thy summer,” Sonn. 6, 1. Sonn. 13, 11. Err. V, 312. cf. As II, 3, 52 and Wint. IV, 4, 79. “that w. lion, who in rage forgets aged contusions,” H6B V, 3, 2 (== old lion). “I'll take that w. from your lips,” Troil. IV, 5, 24 (viz Nestor's kiss). Of death: “till death, that w., kill it,” H8 III, 2, 179. Of any cheerless situation, as misfortune, poverty, destitution: “a nun of --'s sisterhood,” As III, 4, 17 (one devoted to cold and barren chastity). “that w. should cut off our spring-time so,” H6C II, 3, 47. “if we use delay, cold biting w. mars our hoped-for hay,” IV, 8, 61. “the w. of our discontent,” R3 I, 1, 1. “this goodly summer with your w. mixed,” Tit. V, 2, 172. “'tis deepest w. in Lord Timon's purse,” Tim. III, 4, 14. “as poor as w.” Oth. III, 3, 173. “quake in the present --'s state,” Cymb. II, 4, 5. cf. Tim. III, 6, 33. IV, 3, 264. Ant. V, 2, 87.
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