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Wish, vb. 1) to have a wish, to desire; absol.: “had time cohered with place and place with --ing,” Meas. II, 1, 11. “w. chastely and love dearly,” All's I, 3, 218. With for: “the sweets we w. for,” Lucr. 867. Ado IV, 1, 118. As V, 2, 52. H4A I, 2, 230. R3 I, 3, 245. IV, 4, 80. H8 II, 2, 101. III, 1, 98. Tit. V, 2, 160. Rom. II, 2, 132. With an inf.: “he you oft have --ed to hear from,” Gent. II, 4, 103. Meas. II, 4, 78. Tw. II, 5, 167. Wint. II, 1, 123. H6B IV, 9, 6. H8 III, 2, 89. Cor. III, 1, 153. Tim. IV, 2, 31. Per. II, 1, 118 etc. With a subjunctive following: “w. I were renewed,” Sonn. 111, 8. “I w. all good befortune you,” Gent. IV, 3, 41. “I w. he never find more cause to change a master,” Ant. IV, 5, 15. “I w. my brother make good time with him,” Cymb. IV, 2, 108. Pilgr. 198. Tp. V, 150. Meas. IV, 1, 10. LLL V, 2, 55. Merch. II, 8, 32. As III, 3, 23. H6A V, 4, 31. Tim. V, 1, 91. Mcb. V, 5, 50. Hml. III, 1, 38 etc. With may or might: Ven. Ded. Hml. III, 1, 38 H4B V, 2, 104. Tit. V, 2, 203. Caes. III, 1, 13. Caes. III, 1, 13 Hml. III, 1, 42. Ven. 447. All's I, 3, 4. Tw. III, 1, 156. H6B III, 2, 109. IV, 10, 85. R3 V, 1, 14. Caes. III, 1, 16. With should: “I would w. this youth should say,” Wint. IV, 4, 101. Mcb. I, 5, 26. Cymb. V, I, 1. With “would:” Tp. II, 1, 191. Ado II, 3, 215. Oth. II, 3, 36. IV, 1, 263. Cymb. II, 4, 6. “--ed == should w.” Cor. IV, 6, 24
Transitively; a) with a simple accus.: “I would not w. any companion,” Tp. III, 1, 54. “we w. your peace,” IV, 163. “summer's welcome thrice more --ed,” Sonn. 56, 14. “their --ed sight,” Pilgr. 202. Gent. II, 4, 82. Meas. I, 4, 4. Err. I, 1, 91. Ado V, 1, 335. LLL I, 1, 106. Mids. IV, 1, 180. Merch. III, 2, 13. Shr. V, 1, 131. All's I, 2, 63. Wint. V, 1, 143. John I, 260. V, 5, 12. H5 IV, 3, 23. H5 IV, 3, 23 H5 IV, 3, 23 H6A III, 3, 28. H6B II, 4, 90. III, 1, 308. III, 2, 113. H6C III, 2, 140. V, 6, 65. R3 I, 2, 185. H8 IV, 2, 69. Cor. II, 1, 255. Hml. III, 1, 64. Ant. I, 4, 42 etc. b) with an accus. and inf. without to: “in that good path that I would w. it go,” Meas. IV, 3, 138. “--ed him on the barren mountains starve,” H4A I, 3, 159 (Ff starved). c) with a double accus.: “--ing me like to one more rich in hope,” Sonn. 29, 5. “--ed himself the heaven's breath,” Pilgr. 234. “w. me partaker in thy happiness,” Gent. I, 1, 14. Wiv. I, 1, 83. Merch. III, 2, 153. V, 304. Shr. II, 289 All's IV, 5, 84. R2 V, 5, 33. H6C IV, 1, 21. H6C IV, 1, 21 R3 IV, 2, 18. Cor. I, 1, 236 etc. d) with an accus. and an adverbial or prepositional expression: “what is best, that best I w. in thee,” Sonn. 37, 13 (== that it may be in thee). “--ing me with him,” Gent. I, 3, 59. you can w. none (joy) “from me,” Merch. III, 2, 193 (you cannot, by your wish, deprive me of any joy). “to w. it back on you,” III, 4, 44. “we --ed your lordship here,” R3 III, 5, 67. “he could w. himself in Thames,” H5 IV, 1, 120. H5 IV, 1, 120 “how often have I --ed me thus,” Troil. III, 2, 65. “may w. Marcius home,” Cor. IV, 6, 69. “those plagues that I can w. upon thee,” R3 I, 3, 218; cf. Lr. II, 4, 171. to w. a p. well == to attend him with kind wishes: Meas. III, 2, 97. Ado V, 1, 333. Merch. IV, 1, 420. All's I, 1, 193. All's I, 1, 193 Per. V, 1, 16. cf. “men in rage strike those that w. them best,” Oth. II, 3, 243, and see Well-wished. e) with an accus. and dative: to whom I w. long life, Lucr. Ded. Oth. II, 3, 243 “to thy sacred state w. I all happiness,” R2 V, 6, 6. Cor. II, 2, 157. “more direful hap . . . than I can w. to adders,” R3 I, 2, 19. “as you w. Christian peace to souls departed,” H8 IV, 2, 156. I w. it to you (the good time of day) Tim. III, 6, 2. Dative without to, when placed between the verb and accus.: “w. you joy,” Tp. V, 215. “to w. us one,” H5 IV, 3, 77. Ado II, 1, 200. LLL V, 2, 342. LLL V, 2, 342 Merch. III, 2, 192. III, 4, 42. H4B IV, 2, 79. R3 IV, 1, 65. H8 V, 1, 76. Cor. I, 3, 123. Ant. V, 2, 281 etc. “thy own wish w. I thee,” LLL II, 179. Towards for to: “a heart that --es t. you honour and plenteous safety,” H8 I, 1, 103. The relation of the dat. and accus. peculiarly inverted: “I could not w. them to a fairer death,” Mcb. V, 8, 49.
2) to desire, to invite, to ask, to bid; with an inf. with to: nor (was I) “--ed to hold my peace,” Meas. V, 79. “I will w. thee never more to dance,” LLL V, 2, 400. “--ing me to permit my chaplain . . . a choice hour,” H8 I, 2, 161. “when man was --ed to love his enemies,” Tim. IV, 3, 473. “this she --ed me to make known,” Cymb. III, 5, 50. without to: “to w. him wrestle with affection,” Ado III, 1, 42. “such thanks I give as one near death to those that w. him live,” All's II, 1, 134. “the rest I w. thee gather,” H6A II, 5, 96. With to before a noun, == to invite: “I will w. him to her father,” Shr. I, 1, 113 (invite him to offer his service to her father). “shall I . . . w. thee to a shrewd ill-favoured wife? . . . thou'rt too much my friend, and I'll not w. thee to her,” I, 2, 60. 64 (shall I invite thee to try thy fortune with etc.; shall I treat thee to a shrew?)
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