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With; denoting a being together; f. i. “the breeder . . . swiftly doth forsake him; w. her the horse,” Ven. 322. “keep w. thy hounds,” Ven. 322 “let's all sink w. the king,” Tp. I, 1, 67. “any thing . . . that hath kept w. thy remembrance,” I, 2, 44. “that which good natures could not abide to be w.” I, 2, 44 “wishing me w. him,” Gent. I, 3, 59. “I lingered w. you at your shop,” Err. III, 1, 3. “leave him here w. me,” V, 108. “to come w. thee,” H6C IV, 8, 13.
Peculiar use after verbs of motion or, at least, implying the idea of motion, to express the effect of it: “nay, rather damn them w. King Cerberus,” H4B II, 4, 181 (i. e. so that they may be in hell). “lay me with Juliet,” Rom. V, 3, 73. “w. dishonour laid me on the ground,” H6B III, 3, 9 (laid me on the ground, where I lie in the company of dishonour). “I have seen the ambitious oceanswell . . . to be exalted w. the threatening clouds,” Caes. I, 3, 8. “give him a statue w. his ancestors,” III, 2, 55 (in that place where the statues of his ancestors stand). I'll pluck ye (eyes) “out and cast you w. the waters that you lose, to temper clay,” Lr. I, 4, 325 (that you may lie on the ground together with the tears which you have shed. M. Edd. erroneously: and cast you, w. the waters etc.) “return w. her?” II, 4, 214 (== return to be and live with her? quite == return to her). cf. to lie and sit w. in As I, 2, 213. Meas. V, 246. H6C III, 3, 2; and the similar use of at home in Ant. I, 2, 190: the letters of our friends in Rome petition us at home (== to be at home, i.e. to come home). The same principle applicable to the following passages: “who, being suffered w. the bear's fell paw, hath clapped his tail between his legs and cried,” H6B V, 1, 153 (being suffered to be w., i. e. to combat with etc.). “that the noble Moor should hazard such a place as his own second w. one of an ingraft infirmity,” Oth. II, 3, 145.
Inversely, after verbs of separation (especially to part) that with which a person or thing has hitherto been together, indicated by with: “let the stinking elder, grief, untwine his perishing root w. the increasing vine,” Cymb. IV, 2, 60 (== from; so as to be no more twined with). “how did thy master part w. Madam Julia?” Gent. II, 5, 11. “when you parted w. him,” R2 I, 4, 10. II, 2, 2. III, 2, 8. R3 I, 4, 251. “hath willingly departed w. a part,” John II, 563.
I'll be w. you == 1) I'll be in your company, I'll come to you: “I'll be w. you anon,” H4B V, 3, 28. Troil. I, 2, 304. cf. As I, 1, 89. 2) in a menacing tone, == I'll chastise you, I'll teach you good manners, you shall pay for this (Latin quos ego!): “I will be w. thee straight,” Mids. III, 2, 403. what, do you grumble? I'll “be w. you straight,” Shr. IV, 1, 170. “I'll be w. you anon,” Tw. III, 4, 353. “I shall be w. you presently, good master puppy,” H8 V, 4, 29. cf. “I'll be w. you at your sheepshearing too,” Wint. IV, 3, 128 (i. e. I'll pick your pockets there). “Cardinal, I am w. you,” H6B II, 1, 48. “was I w. you there for the goose?” Rom. II, 4, 78 (cf. Wint. I, 2, 217. Cor. III, 2, 74).
Denoting identity of place: “she looks for night, and then she longs for morrow, and both she thinks too long w. her remaining,” Lucr. 1572 (==where she is). “there was an old woman even now w. me,” Wiv. IV, 5, 26 (in my chamber). “some say he is w. the emperor of Russia,” Meas. III, 2, 93. “her brother's noontide w. the Antipodes,” Mids. III, 2, 55. “thou shalt not gormandise, as thou hast done w. me,” Merch. II, 5, 4. “I entreat you home w. me to dinner,” IV, 1, 401. As III, 3, 43. John IV, 1, 30. V, 4, 40. Tim. III, 2, 12. Cymb. III, 5, 83 etc. “he is not w. himself,” Tit. I, 368 (== he is beside himself. Ff he is not himself).
The notion of locality applied to abstract ideas: “w. Death she humbly doth insinuate,” Ven. 1012. “he w. the Romans was esteemed so,” Lucr. 1811. “I lie w. her, and she w. me,” Sonn. 138, 13 (I tell her untruths; cf. Oth. IV, 1, 36). “will you grant w. me,” Tp. II, 1, 243. “'tis fresh morning w. me,” III, 1, 33. “'tis a custom w. him i'th' afternoon to sleep,” III, 2, 95. “whose credit w. the judge,” Meas. II, 4, 92. “I will break w. her,” Ado I, 1, 311 (cf. Break). “not a word w. him but a jest,” LLL II, 216. “a place of high respect w. me,” Mids. II, 1, 209. “have all persuaded w. him,” Merch. III, 2, 283. “are not w. me esteemed above thy life,” IV, 1, 285. “to flatter w. his lord,” Tw. I, 5, 322; R2 II, 1, 88. “he can do all in all w. her that hateth thee,” H6B II, 4, 52. “your displeasure w. the king,” H8 III, 2, 392. “it is an accustomed action w. her,” Mcb. V, 1, 32. “is Caesar w. Antonius prized so light?” Ant. I, 1, 56. “his taints and honours waged equal w. him,” V, 1, 31. “a goodly day not to keep house w. such whose roof's as low as ours,” Cymb. III, 3, 1. “the shipman . . . w. whom each minute threatens life or death,” Per. I, 3, 25 etc. cf. the following phrases: “what news w. your mastership?” Gent. III, 1, 280 (what news have you to tell?); “what tidings w. our cousin Buckingham?” H6B II, 1, 165. “what's your will w. me?” Gent. III, 1, 3. “what wouldst thou have w. me?” Rom. III, 1, 79. “what would you w. her?” Gent. IV, 4, 115. Wiv. III, 4, 64. IV, 5, 30. LLL V, 2, 178. Merch. II, 2, 128. H4A II, 3, 98. “what w. me?” Wiv. II, 2, 41. Tit. IV, 2, 54. Tim. II, 2, 15. “I'll no more w. thee,” Tw. III, 1, 49. Thus used to designate the person whom (or the thing which) an action concerns or with respect to whom a quality is exhibited or a state expressed: “to practise his judgment w. the disposition of natures,” Meas. III, 1, 165. “heaven doth w. us as we w. torches do,” I, 1, 33. “do w. 'em what thou wilt,” H6A IV, 7, 94. “breaking faith w. Julia,” Gent. IV, 2, 11. “you do not keep promise w. me,” Tw. V, 106. “keeping thy word w. the devil,” H4A I, 2, 135. “the regent hath w. Talbot broke his word,” H6A IV, 6, 2. “in hand w. all things,” Ven. 912. “how the world is changed w. you,” Err. II, 2, 154. “I am witness w. her that she did,” IV, 4, 92. “thus stands it w. me,” Meas. I, 2, 149. “'tis better w. me now than when I met thee last,” R3 III, 2, 100. “so is it not w. me as w. that Muse,” Sonn. 21, 1. Meas. I, 1, 82. II, 2, 82. All's II, 1, 152. Tw. III, 4, 97. V, 199. Wint. I, 2, 148. R2 II, 1, 72. Cor. I, 6, 33. V, 6, 10. Rom. III, 3, 93. Mcb. II, 2, 58. Hml. III, 4, 115. Hml. III, 4, 115 IV, 1, 13. Oth. III, 4, 33. Cymb. IV, 3, 1. “are w. gain so fond,” Lucr. 134. “stands at a guard w. envy,” Meas. I, 3, 51. “be not angry w. me,” Ado III, 1, 94. “do not be so bitter w. me,” Mids. III, 2, 306. “in love w. a disdainful youth,” II, 1, 261. “bear w. me,” LLL V, 2, 417. “be opposite w. a kinsman, surly w. servants,” Tw. II, 5, 162. “be plainer w. me,” Wint. I, 2, 265. “be fire w. fire,” John V, 1, 48. “are you so choleric w. Eleanor,” H6B I, 2, 52. “is so pleasant w. us,” H5 I, 2, 259. “an a' be proud w. me,” Troil. II, 3, 215. “I would dissemble w. my nature,” Cor. III, 2, 62. “I'll be cruel w. the maids,” Rom. I, 1, 27. “the troubled Tiber chafing w. her shores,” Caes. I, 2, 101. “the world, too saucy w. the gods,” I, 3, 12. “that I am meek and gentle w. these butchers,” Caes. III, 1, 255 etc. Peculiar expression: “they're here w. me already, whispering, rounding, 'Sicilia is a so-forth',” Wint. I, 2, 217 (they go so far with respect to me as to whisper. The words perhaps accompanied by a corresponding gesture emblematizing cuckoldom). “go to them, w. this bonnet in thy hand, and thus far having stretched it -- here be w. them -- thy knee bussing the stones,” Cor. III, 2, 74 (do thus in addressing them). “O ho, are you there w. me? no eyes in your head?” Lr. IV, 6, 148.
Denoting junction and community: “the world hath ending w. thy life,” Ven. 12. “his smell w. others being mingled,” Ven. 12 “w. him is beauty slain,” Ven. 12 “I have suffered w. those that I saw suffer,” Tp. I, 2, 6. “executing the outward face of royalty w. all prerogative,” Tp. I, 2, 6 “confederates . . . w. the king of Naples,” Tp. I, 2, 6 “confer fair Milan w. all the honours on my brother,” Tp. I, 2, 6 “fresh water . . . that Gonzalo . . . did give us, w. rich garments,” Tp. I, 2, 6 “I would mine eyes would w. themselves shut up my thoughts,” II, 1, 192. “a tongue w. a tang,” II, 2, 52. “w. my nobler reason 'gainst my fury do I take part,” V, 26. “to marry w. Nan Page,” Wiv. IV, 4, 85. “join not w. grief,” R2 V, 1, 16. “to wail it w. their age,” R3 IV, 4, 394 (in v. 392 Qq in). “the kings your ancestors, together w. the natural bravery of your isle,” Cymb. III, 1, 17 etc. etc. see Confer, Speak etc. and the burden “w. heigh ho, the wind and the rain,” Tw. V, 399. Wint. IV, 3, 2. Hence expressing correspondence, likeness and comparison: “nothing w. his proud sight agrees,” Ven. 288. “lay this Angiers even w. the ground,” John II, 399. “wishing his foot were equal w. his eye,” H6C III, 2, 137. “measure my strangeness w. my unripe years,” Ven. 524. “weigh oath w. oath,” Mids. III, 2, 131. “compare w. Caesars,” H4B II, 4, 180 etc. Sometimes almost == like: “indenting w. the way,” Ven. 704. “seemed w. him to bleed,” Ven. 704 “w. others thou shouldst not obhor my state,” Sonn. 150, 12. “of nature's gifts thou mayst w. lilies boast and w. the half-blown rose,” John III, 1, 53. “as if w. Circe she would change my shape,” H6A V, 3, 35.*Noting simultaneousness: “w. this she seizeth on his sweating palm,” Ven. 25. “and w. that word she spied the hunted boar,” Ven. 25 “w. every minute you do change a mind,” Cor. I, 1, 186. “to-morrow w. your earliest let me have speech w. you,” Oth. II, 3, 7. “w. your speediest bring us what she says,” Ant. V, 1, 67. cf. Ven. 811. Ven. 811 Lucr. 1639. Lucr. 1639 Tit. V, 1, 37. Caes. III, 2, 48 etc. cf. the phrases: “come w. a thought,” Tp. IV, 164. “he would kiss you twenty w. a breath,” H8 I, 4, 30. After expressions of contest (as, for a combat, there must needs be two): “w. herself at strife,” Ven. 11. Ven. 11 “encounter w. the boar,” Ven. 11 “leaden slumber w. life's strength doth fight,” Lucr. 124. “in rebellion w. himself,” Wint. I, 2, 355. “his face still combating w. tears,” R2 V, 2, 32 etc.
The idea of community lost sight of after prepositional and adverbial expressions originating in it: “to the forge w. it,” Wiv. IV, 2, 239. “to the rack w. him,” Meas. V, 313. “to prison w. her,” Meas. V, 313 “then to cart w. Rosalind,” As III, 2, 114. “to Bedlam w. him,” H6B V, 1, 131. “to pieces w. me,” Cymb. III, 4, 55. “away w. the rest,” Tp. IV, 247. Wiv. IV, 2, 45. Meas. III, 2, 217. V, 46. John IV, 2, 155. H6A I, 1, 86. “down w. the topmast,” Tp. I, 1, 37. Gent. IV, 1, 2. LLL IV, 3, 368. Tim. IV, 3, 157. “forward w. your tale,” Tp. III, 2, 91. “off w. Barnardine's head,” Meas. IV, 2, 222. H4B V, 1, 60. H6B II, 1, 151. “out w. it,” Gent. III, 1, 339. IV, 4, 22. Tim. IV, 1, 9. “up w. your fights,” Wiv. II, 2, 142.
Denoting that which accompanies and modifies, either as an external appearance, or as a quality: “the sun w. purple-coloured face,” Ven. 1. “w. long dishevelled hair,” Ven. 1 “w. hair up-staring,” Tp. I, 2, 213. “let him die w. every joint a wound,” Troil. IV, 1, 29. “w. this bonnet in thy hand,” Cor. III, 2, 73 etc. “w. a lazy spright,” Ven. 181. “he trots w. gentle majesty,” Ven. 181 “swelleth w. more rage,” Ven. 181 “w. disturbed mind,” Ven. 181 “w. weary gait,” Ven. 181 “w. blindfold fury,” Ven. 181 “he cranks and crosses w. a thousand doubles,” Ven. 181 Tp. I, 2, 28. Tp. I, 2, 28 Tp. I, 2, 28 III, 1, 40. Gent. I, 1, 8. Meas. V, 50 (w. that opinion) etc. etc. cf. the phrases: “that w. his very heart despiseth me,” Gent. IV, 4, 99. “my daughter's mother thinks it w. her soul,” R3 IV, 4, 256. w. my soul I love thy daughter, 262 etc.
Hence denoting a means: “I'll smother thee w. kisses,” Ven. 18. “not cloy thy lips w. loathed satiety,” Ven. 18 “to try w. main-course,” Tp. I, 1, 38. “the bettering of my mind w. that which . . . o'erprized all popular rate,” I, 2, 91. “w. colours fairer painted their foul ends,” I, 2, 91 I, 2, 91 I, 2, 91 I, 2, 91 I, 2, 91 I, 2, 91 I, 2, 91 II, 1, 119. II, 1, 119 II, 2, 5. II, 2, 5 II, 2, 5 III, 2, 97. III, 2, 97 IV, 158. Epil. IV, 158 Gent. I, 1, 29. I, 2, 94. I, 2, 94 IV, 2, 6 etc. etc. Peculiar passage: “since I have crept in favour w. myself, I will maintain it w. some little cost,” R3 I, 2, 259 (i. e., according to Abbott, since I have gained favour by my person). A person as means: “he did arrest me w. an officer,” Err. V, 230. “his hands were . . . bloody w. the enemies of his kin,” R2 II, 1, 183. “send for his master w. a pursuivant,” H6B I, 3, 37. After expressions of providing or furnishing: “one w. treasure laden,” Ven. 1022. “w. hairy bristles armed,” Ven. 1022 “replete w. too much rage,” Sonn. 23, 3. “infused w. a fortitude from heaven,” Tp. I, 2, 154. “not honoured w. a human shape,” Tp. I, 2, 154 “touched w. madness,” Meas. V, 51. “her womb then rich w. my young squire,” Mids. II, 1, 131; H5 I, 2, 163. “I'll fill these dogged spies w. false reports,” John IV, 1, 129. “to possess me w. these fears,” IV, 2, 203. “I did present him w. the Paris balls,” H5 II, 4, 131. “blessed w. beauty,” H6A I, 2, 86. “arming myself w. patience,” Caes. V, 1, 106. how Thaliard came full bent w. sin, Per. II Prol. 23. cf. “I rather will suspect the sun w. cold,” Wiv. IV, 4, 7. “acquaint her w. the danger of my state,” Meas. I, 2, 184 etc. The phrases w. child, w. young, see sub Child and Young.
Before means of nourishment == on: “to dine and sup w. water and bran,” Meas. IV, 3, 159. “you shall fast a week w. bran and water,” LLL I, 1, 303. “feast w. the best,” Shr. V, 2, 8. “I live w. bread like you,” R2 III, 2, 175. “I have supped full w. horrors,” Mcb. V, 5, 13. cf. “they are as sick that surfeit w. too much as they that starve w. nothing,” Merch. I, 2, 6. Cor. III, 3, 90.
Denoting a cause: “he burns w. bashful shame,” Ven. 49. “swoln w. chafing,” Ven. 49 “a dying coal revives w. wind,” Ven. 49 “pale w. fear,” Lucr. 183. “die w. terror,” Lucr. 183 “forced it to tremble w. her loyal fear,” Lucr. 183 “his hand smoking w. pride,” Lucr. 183 “sweating w. guilty fear,” Lucr. 183 Lucr. 183 Lucr. 183 Lucr. 183 Sonn. 23, 2 “(who w. his fear is put besides his part).” 75, 9. 124, 12. Tp. I, 2, 212 “(afire w. me).” Tp. I, 2, 212 IV, 113. IV, 113 IV, 113 Gent. I, 1, 69. Wiv. II, 2, 301. Err. I, 2, 20. Ado I, 1, 250. Ado I, 1, 250 LLL II, 239. Mids. II, 2, 148. Merch. I, 1, 81. II, 1, 38. Tw. III, 4, 366 “(this comes w. seeking you).” R2 II, 2, 12 “(my inward soul w. nothing trembles: at something it grieves, more than w. parting from my lord the king).” H4B IV, 5, 13. H6A II, 5, 15. II, 4, 63. R3 I, 4, 42 (awaked you not w. this sore agony? Ff “in).” IV, 3, 20 (gone w. conscience and remorse; see “Go).” Tim. IV, 3, 493 “(weep w. laughing, not w. weeping).” Caes. IV, 3, 191 “(w. meditating that she must die once I have the patience to endure it now).” Mcb. V, 3, 10. Cymb. IV, 3, 2 (a fever w. the absence of her son) etc. etc. Often encroaching on the function of other prepositions, f. i. “overjoyed w. finding a bird's nest,” Ado II, 1, 230. “w. that all laughed,” LLL V, 2, 107 (M. Edd. unnecessarily w. that, all etc.). “I feel remorse in myself w. his words,” H6B IV, 7, 111. “will forget w. the least cause these his new honours,” Cor. II, 1, 245. 3, 267.
Lastly, denoting an external agency, by which an effect is produced, and which is usually -- and at present exclusively -- expressed by the prepos. by: “her best work is ruined w. thy rigour,” Ven. 954. it (love) “shall be waited on w. jealousy,” Ven. 954 accompanied w. his sons, Lucr. Arg. Ven. 954 “made glorious by his manly chivalry, w. bruised arms and wreaths of victory,” Lucr. 110. “blinded w. a greater light,” Lucr. 110 “huge fires abide and w. the wind in greater fury fret,” Lucr. 110 “eagles are gazed upon w. every eye,” Lucr. 110 “what wit sets down is blotted straight w. will,” Lucr. 110 “a woman's face w. nature's own hand painted,” Sonn. 20, 1. “stone besmeared w. sluttish time,” 55, 4. “crushed w. time's injurious hand,” 63, 2. “consumed w. that which it was nourished by,” 73, 12. “wounded w. a boar,” Pilgr. 126. “killed w. a thunder-stroke,” Tp. II, 2, 112. “though w. their high wrongs I am struck to the quick,” V, 25. “the mean is drowned w. your unruly base,” Gent. I, 2, 96. “metamorphosed w. a mistress,” II, 1, 32. “lust is but a bloody fire kindled w. unchaste desire,” Wiv. V, 5, 100. “to be overmastered w. a piece of valiant dust,” Ado II, 1, 64. “a vane blown w. all winds,” III, 1, 66. “a better death than die w. mocks, which is as bad as die w. tickling,” III, 1, 66 “had our two noses snapped off w. two old men,” V, 1, 116. “brought w. armed men back to Messina,” V, 4, 128. “we shall be dogged w. company,” Mids. I, 2, 106. “pierced through the heart w. your stern cruelty,” III, 2, 59. “hit w. Cupid's archery,” III, 2, 59 “fanned w. the eastern wind,” III, 2, 59 “wounded w. the claws of a lion,” As V, 2, 26. “braved in mine own house w. a skein of thread,” Shr. IV, 3, 111. “bedazzled w. the sun,” IV, 5, 46. “your son was misled w. a snipt taffeta fellow,” All's IV, 5, 1. “I saw him put down w. an ordinary fool,” Tw. I, 5, 91. “torn to pieces w. a bear,” Wint. V, 2, 68. “we are mocked w. art,” V, 3, 68. “rounded in the ear w. that purpose-changer,” John II, 567. “wars shall kin w. kin and kind w. kind confound,” R2 IV, 141. “affrighted w. their bloody looks,” H4A I, 3, 104. “was Mahomet inspired w. a dove,” H6A I, 2, 140. “if I to-day die not w. Frenchmen's rage,” IV, 6, 34. “followed w. a rabble,” H6B II, 4, 32. “w. whose sting . . . your uncle . . . is bereft of life,” III, 2, 267. “boarded w. a pirate,” IV, 9, 33. w. robbers so o'ermatched, H6CI, 4, 64. “backed w. France,” IV, 1, 41. “marred w. traitors,” Caes. III, 2, 201. “that we can let our beards be shook w. danger,” Hml. IV, 7, 32. “must I be unfolded w. one that I have bred,” Ant. V, 2, 171. Ven. 559. Lucr. 173. Lucr. 173 Lucr. 173 Sonn. 5, 7. 27, 1. 122, 2. 128, 3. Tp. I, 2, 256. Tp. I, 2, 256 III, 3, 5. III, 3, 5 IV, 160. Gent. III, 2, 7. IV, 1, 12. Wiv. II, 1, 22. III, 4, 5. Meas. III, 1, 26. Err. I, 2, 15. II, 1, 34. Ado I, 1, 67. LLL V, 2, 291. Mids. II, 1, 129. Mids. II, 1, 129 As II, 7, 50. III, 2, 196. III, 3, 13. John II, 26. H4A I, 3, 107. H5 III, 1, 14. H6A I, 1, 136. I, 2, 85. II, 5, 4. H6B I, 3, 132. III, 1, 223. R3 IV, 4, 239. Cor. V, 6, 12 etc.
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