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Work, vb. (impf. and partic. always wrought; therefore worked for work in Tim. V, 1, 116 an inadmissible substitution of M. Edd.) 1) to be employed, to labour, to toil: “my nature is subdued to what it --s in,” Sonn. 111, 7. “w. you then,” Tp. I, 1, 45. “w. for bread,” Mids. III, 2, 10. Tp. III, 1, 12. Tp. III, 1, 12 Mids. V, 72. H4A I, 2, 229. H5 I, 2, 187. H6B IV, 7, 57. H8 III, 1, 2. Hml. I, 5, 162. II, 1, 40. Oth. II, 1, 116. III, 3, 383. Cymb. III, 6, 32. Per. II, 1, 69. Applied to an artist: “wrought he not well that painted it?” Tim. I, 1, 200. Tim. I, 1, 200
Trans., == to produce by exertion and labour (of nature or art): “now she unweaves the web that she hath wrought,” Ven. 991. “Nature, as she wrought thee, fell a doting,” Sonn. 20, 10. “so much of earth and water wrought,” 44, 11. a princess wrought it me (a handkerchief) John IV, 1, 43. “great business must be wrought ere noon,” Mcb. III, 5, 22. “so rarely and exactly wrought,” Cymb. II, 4, 75.
2) to be in action or motion: “what me your minister, for you obeys, --s under you,” Compl. 230. “no more remains but that to your sufficiency, as your worth is able, and let them w.” Meas. I, 1, 10. “to swear by him whom I protest to love, that I will w. against him,” All's IV, 2, 29. “never did base and rotten policy colour her --ing with such deadly wounds,” H4A I, 3, 109. “by whose fell --ing I was first advanced,” H4B IV, 5, 207. “many things, having full reference to one consent, may w. contrariously,” H5 I, 2, 206. “--ing so grossly in a natural cause,” II, 2, 107. “not --ing with the eye without the ear,” II, 2, 107 “how I will w. to bring this matter to the wished end,” H6A III, 3, 27. “limbs are his instruments, in no less --ing than are swords and bows,” Troil. I, 3, 355. “that you w. not in holier shapes,” Tim. IV, 3, 429. “our will . . . which else should free have wrought,” Mcb. II, 1, 19. “the instruments, who wrought with them,” III, 1, 82. “in what particular thought to w. I know not,” Hml. I, 1, 67. “briefness and fortune, w.” Lr. II, 1, 20. “the better shall my purpose w. on him,” Oth. I, 3, 397 (cf. Lucr. 235 sub 3). “we w. by wit and not by witchcraft,” II, 3, 378. “the sea --s high,” Per. III, 1, 48 (the sailor's speech). “have you a --ing pulse?” V, 1, 155. cf. Lucr. 361. Sonn. 124, 10. Meas. III, 2, 222. Merch. I, 3, 74. All's III, 7, 3. H8 II, 2, 24. Caes. II, 1, 209 (let me w. == let me do). Hml. III, 4, 205 (let it w. == let things take their course). Lr. I, 4, 231. IV, 7, 1. Ant. II, 2, 94. Cymb. I, 5, 48. IV, 3, 41 (the heavens still must w.). With an accus. denoting an effect: “to w. her son into the adoption of the crown,” Cymb. V, 5, 55. cf. Rom. III, 5, 145.
The gerund often applied to the motions or labours of the mind: “whate'er thy thoughts or thy heart's --ings be,” Sonn. 93, 11. “in the --ing of your own affections,” Meas. II, 1, 10. “we bend to that the --ing of the heart,” LLL IV, 1, 33. “his will hath in it a more modest --ing,” As I, 2, 215. “intelligencer between the grace, the sanctities of heaven and our dull --ings,” H4B IV, 2, 22 (== affections). “till that his passions . . . confound themselves with --ing,” IV, 4, 41. “I am sick with --ing of my thoughts,” H6A V, 5, 86. “or given my heart a --ing mute and dumb,” Hml. II, 2, 137 (Ff winking). from her (his soul's) “--ing all his visage wann'd,” Hml. II, 2, 137 Similarly with an accus. of the effect: “the incessant care . . . hath wrought the mure so thin,” H4B IV, 4, 119.
Transitively, == to do, to perform, to act: “the wiles and guiles that women w.” Pilgr. 335. “that they may w. all exercise on thee,” Tp. I, 2, 327. “thou hast wrought a deed of slander,” R2 V, 6, 34. “rather to wonder at the things you hear than to w. any,” Cymb. V, 3, 55. The gerund substantively: “mock your --ings in a second body,” H4B V, 2, 90 (== actions, doings).
3) to operate, to produce an effect: “so from himself impiety hath wrought, that for his prey to pray he doth begin,” Lucr. 341. “it --s,” Tp. I, 2, 493. “my high charms w.” III, 3, 88. Wiv. IV, 2, 185. Meas. III, 2, 33. LLL I, 2, 10. All's I, 3, 190. Shr. III, 2, 220. Wint. III, 2, 181. H6B II, 1, 7. H6B II, 1, 7. III, 2, 37. Caes. III, 2, 265. Hml. III, 4, 114. IV, 7, 20 (Ff would). Oth. III, 3, 123. V, 2, 323. Ant. IV, 14, 125. With on or upon: “this desire might have excuse to w. upon his wife,” Lucr. 235 (almost == to practise; cf. Tw. II, 3, 166 and Oth. I, 3, 397). “now Prosper --s upon thee,” Tp. II, 2, 84. on that vice in him will my “revenge find notable cause to w.” Tw. II, 3, 166. “does it w. upon him?” II, 5, 213. II, 5, 213. II, 2, 112. H8 II, 2, 58. Tit. III, 2, 79. Tim. III, 1, 63. Caes. II, 1, 253. Hml. V, 1, 308. Oth. IV, 1, 286. Used of medicaments and poisons: Tp. III, 3, 105. Wint. I, 2, 320. H4B IV, 4, 47. Rom. IV, 3, 21. Oth. IV, 1, 45. Per. III, 2, 10. with upon: “with some mixtures he wrought upon her,” Oth. I, 3, 106. Cymb. I, 5, 28. with with: “my physic will w. with him,” Tw. II, 3, 188. II, 5, 215.
Transitively, == a) to produce by operation, to effect: “force must w. my way,” Lucr. 513. “why --est thou mischief in thy pilgrimage?” Lucr. 513 “one silly cross wrought all my loss,” Pilgr. 258. “if you can . . ., w. the peace of the present,” Tp. I, 1, 24. “to w. mine end upon their senses,” V, 53. “his friends still wrought reprieves for him,” Meas. IV, 2, 140. Err. I, 1, 35. Ado II, 2, 54. Merch. III, 2, 90. As IV, 3, 53. Shr. V, 1, 127. John III, 4, 179. IV, 2, 236. R2 IV, 4. H6A I, 2, 49. III, 2, 39. V, 4, 41. V, 4, 41 H6B I, 3, 70. II, 1, 186. III, 1, 73. V, 1, 70. H6C V, 7, 25. Troil II, 2, 114. Cor. V, 3, 201. Tit. I, 264. V, 2, 8. V, 2, 8 Rom. V, 3, 245 “(it wrought on her the form of death).” Lr. II, 1, 86. IV, 7, 97. Per. III, 2, 38. With an infinitive: “you wrought to be a legate,” H8 III, 2, 311. “that hath beside well in his person wrought to be set high in place,” Cor. II, 3, 254. “that we have wrought so worthy a gentleman to be her bridegroom,” Rom. III, 5, 145 (not == induced, prevailed upon, but brought about, effected).
b) to act upon, to operate upon: “then begins a journey in my head, to w. my mind, when body's work's expired,” Sonn. 27, 4. “some passion that --s him strongly,” Tp. IV, 144. V, 17. “if I had thought the sight of my poor image would thus have wrought you,” Wint. V, 3, 58. “w. your thoughts, and therein see a siege,” H5 III Chor. H5 III Chor. “have wrought the easy-melting king like wax,” H6C II, 1, 171. “my dull brain was wrought with things forgotten,” Mcb. I, 3, 149. “not easily jealous, but being wrought, perplexed in the extreme,” Oth. V, 2, 345.
With prepositional expressions denoting the result and change produced by operation or influence: “will w. us all from princes into pages,” H8 II, 2, 47. “what you would w. me to, I have some aim,” Caes. I, 2, 163. “thy honourable metal may be wrought from that it is disposed,” Caes. I, 2, 163 “I will w. him to an exploit,” Hml. IV, 7, 64. “to w. her to your manage,” Per. IV, 6, 69.
With out, == to make out, to solve: “did not I say he would w. it out?” Tw. II, 5, 139. == to carry as a prize by endeavour, to gain, to save: “if we wrought out life, 'twas ten to one,” H4B I, 1, 182.
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