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Worm, 1) any small creeping animal: Lucr. 1248. Mids. II, 2, 23. H6C II, 2, 17. Mcb. IV, 2, 32. Per. IV, 1, 79. breeding in and destroying buds: Lucr. 848. Tw. II, 4, 114. Rom. I, 1, 157. feeding on human bodies after death: Sonn. 6, 14. 71, 4. 74, 10. 146, 7. Merch. II, 7, 69. As III, 2, 67. IV, 1, 108. John III, 4, 31. R2 III, 2, 145. H4A V, 4, 87. H4B IV, 5, 117. R3 IV, 4, 386. H8 IV, 2, 126. Rom. III, 1, 112. V, 3, 109 “(--s that are thy chamber-maids).” Hml. IV, 3, 21.* Hml. IV, 3, 21 Hml. IV, 3, 21 Hml. IV, 3, 21 V, 1, 97 “(now my Lady Worm's).” Cymb. IV, 2, 218. Per. IV, 2, 26. causing the toothache: Ado III, 2, 27. “pricked from the lazy finger of a maid,” Rom. I, 4, 65. producing silk: Lr. III, 4, 108. Oth. III, 4, 73.
Emblem of remorse gnawing the mind: “if Don W., his conscience, find no impediment,” Ado V, 2, 86. “the w. of conscience still begnaw thy soul,” R3 I, 3, 222.
Expression of pity: “poor w., thou art infected,” Tp. III, 1, 31. the poor w. (the mole) “doth die for it,” Per. I, 1, 102. of contempt: “vile w., thou wast o'erlooked even in thy birth,” Wiv. V, 5, 87. LLL IV, 3, 154. Shr. V, 2, 169. cf. Lr. IV, 1, 35.
2) a snake: “dost fear the soft and tender fork of a poor w.” Meas. III, 1, 17 (the tongue being supposed the instrument with which the serpent did offence). “could not a w., an adder, do so much?” Mids. III, 2, 71. H6A III, 1, 72. H6B III, 2, 263. Tim. IV, 3, 182. Mcb. III, 4, 29. Ant. V, 2, 243. Ant. V, 2, 243 Ant. V, 2, 243 Ant. V, 2, 243 Ant. V, 2, 243 Ant. V, 2, 243 Ant. V, 2, 243 Ant. V, 2, 243 Cymb. III, 4, 37. It is in this sense undoubtedly that Venus calls Death “grim-grinning ghost, earth's w.” Ven. 933.
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