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Want, vb. 1) not to have, to be without: “that golden hap which their superiors w.” Lucr. 42. “to w. his bliss,” Lucr. 42 “--ing the spring that those shrunk pipes had fed,” Lucr. 42 “eyes this cunning w. to grace their art,” Sonn. 24, 13. “how can my Muse w. subject to invent,” 38, 1. “those parts of thee . . . w. nothing that the thought of hearts can mend,” 69, 2. “unripe years did w. conceit,” Pilgr. 51. “much less take what I shall die to w.” Tp. III, 1, 79. III, 3, 25. III, 3, 25 IV, 58. Epil. IV, 58 Gent. II, 4, 112. II, 6, 12. III, 1, 147. Wiv. II, 2, 268. Wiv. II, 2, 268 V, 5, 144. Err. I, 1, 8. II, 2, 153. IV, 1, 4. Ado III, 2, 20. LLL IV, 2, 81. Mids. I, 1, 54. II, 1, 101. Merch. V, 205. As III, 2, 26. III, 3, 64. Shr. Ind. 1, 104. III, 2, 5. All's I, 1, 81. II, 4, 4. Wint. I, 2, 128. III, 2, 56 (--ed less, == had less; see Appendix). IV, 2, 15. IV, 4, 617. John II, 435. R2 III, 3, 179. H4A I, 2, 225. H6A I, 1, 75. Troil. III, 3, 25. Per. I, 4, 19 etc. “did w. of what I was in the morning,” Ant. II, 2, 76 (of used partitively, == part of what; cf. Of). “--ing of thy love,” Rom. II, 2, 78 (cf. Of). As for the phrase “the want that you have --ed,” Lr. I, 1, 282, see Ruin, vb., and cf. wrong in Err. II, 2, 174.
2) to need, to have occasion for; abs.: “what help we have that to your --ing may be ministered,” As II, 7, 126. Trans.: “what thou --est shall be sent after thee,” Gent. I, 3, 74. “a man of such perfection as we do in our quality much w.” IV, 1, 58. Meas. IV, 2, 154. Err. II, 2, 57. III, 1, 77. LLL V, 2, 887. Mids. I, 2, 108. Wint. IV, 3, 87. John IV, 3, 187. H4A I, 2, 175. H6A I, 2, 27. III, 2, 41. H6B III, 1, 236. H6C V, 1, 66. R3 III, 4, 5. R3 III, 4, 5 Per. I, 4, 11. II, 3, 101. Hence == to wish for: “such things that w. no ear but yours,” Meas. IV, 3, 109. “I w. more uncles here to welcome me,” R3 III, 1, 6. “those uncles which you w. are dangerous,” R3 III, 1, 6 cf. Per. II, 3, 101.
3) to suffer indigence: “but, poorly rich, so --eth in his store,” Lucr. 97. “a swallowing gulf that even in plenty --eth,” Lucr. 97 “why should you w.?” Tim. IV, 3, 420. “if heaven slumber while their creatures w.” Per. I, 4, 16. With for: “he cannot w. for money,” Tim. III, 2, 10 (== he cannot want money).
4) to be wanted, to be missed, not to be in sufficient quantity: “the cause of this fair gift in me is --ing,” Sonn. 87, 7. “there --eth but a man to fill your song,” Gent. I, 2, 95. “there w. not many that do fear . . . to walk by this Herne's oak,” Wiv. IV, 4, 39. “where nothing --s that want itself doth seek,” LLL IV, 3, 237. Shr. III, 2, 248. Shr. III, 2, 248 All's I, 1, 11. R2 III, 4, 13. H6A I, 1, 82. H6C II, 6, 102. R3 II, 1, 43. Cor. II, 1, 217. Cor. II, 1, 217 Lr. IV, 6, 269. Cymb. IV, 3, 20. (Perhaps also in LLL V, 2, 887 and R3 III, 4, 5).
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