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Warrant, vb. 1) to assure, to be surety; absol.; I w. or I'll w., a frequent form of asseveration: “she will become thy bed, I w.” Tp. III, 2, 112. “I'll w. we'll unkennel the fox,” Wiv. III, 3, 174. II, 1, 76. III, 3, 4. IV, 2, 235. IV, 5, 101. Meas. I, 2, 176. Err. III, 2, 99. Ado III, 2, 66. III, 4, 10. Merch. IV, 2, 15. As III, 2, 407. Wint. II, 3, 71. John IV, 1, 31. R2 III, 2, 127. H6B V, 1, 122. Cor. I, 3, 71. Oth. IV, 2, 168 (Qq I w. you) etc. “I dare w.” H6A III, 1, 74.
With an accus. of the person to whom an assurance or surety is given: “could all my travels w. me they live,” Err. I, 1, 140. “a foolish hanging of thy nether lip that doth w. me,” H4A II, 4, 447. “said no more but what my thoughts did w. me was likely,” Per. V, 1, 135. I w. thee, I w. you, I'll w. you, phrases of asseveration: Tp. II, 1, 187. IV, 1, 54. Gent. II, 1, 170. V, 4, 166. Wiv. I, 1, 308. I, 4, 12. II, 2, 51. II, 2, 51 II, 2, 51 II, 2, 51 III, 1, 70. III, 3, 40. III, 5, 49. Meas. I, 2, 33. V, 82. Err. IV, 4, 10. Ado II, 1, 378. III, 1, 14. V, 1, 199. H6A I, 4, 21. H6B IV, 3, 19. R3 I, 4, 155 etc.
The person or thing for which assurance or surety is given, as object: “I'll w. him for drowning,” Tp. I, 1, 49. “an assurance that my remembrance --s,” I, 2, 46. “I'll not w. that,” Meas. II, 4, 59. “which with experimental seal doth w. the tenour of my book,” Ado IV, 1, 168. “by other --ed testimony,” All's II, 5, 5. “my fainting words do w. death,” H6A II, 5, 95. “his wealth doth w. a liberal dower,” V, 5, 46. Hence, in asseverations, with the accus. of the person with respect to whom something is said: “I w. him, Petruchio is Kated,” Shr. III, 2, 247. “ay, is't, I w. him,” Tw. III, 4, 160. “that he knew, I w. him,” Wint. IV, 3, 117. “she shall have whipping-cheer, I w. her,” H4B V, 4, 6. to the pot, I w. “him.” Cor. I, 4, 47. “a noble fellow, I w. him,” V, 2, 115. “fast, I w. her, she!” Rom. IV, 5, 1. “and I'll w. her, full of game,” Oth. II, 3, 19. Double accus.: “w. me welcome to my Proteus,” Gent. II, 7, 71. “I'll w. him heart-whole,” As IV, 1, 49. “I w. him consul,” Cor. II, 1, 238. cf. “sith true nobility --s these words in princely courtesy,” Tit. I, 272 (== as spoken in courtesy).
Two different accusatives: the first (death) “I w. thee,” H6B V, 1, 195. “I'll w. you all your lands,” H6C III, 2, 21. “I'll w. him that,” Cor. II, 1, 142.
Inf. following: “discover thine infirmity, that --eth by law to be thy privilege,” H6A V, 4, 61.
2) to authorize, to justify, to allow: “if I know more of any man alive than that which maiden modesty doth w.” Ado IV, 1, 181. “put me to't, I w. you,” All's II, 2, 50. “how far I have proceeded . . . is --ed by a commission from the consistory,” H8 II, 4, 91. --ed == just: “the chance of goodness be like our --ed quarrel,” Mcb. IV, 3, 137.
Hence == to avow, to acknowledge, to make good, to defend: “that in their country did them that disgrace, we fear to w. in our native place,” Troil. II, 2, 96.
3) to secure (against danger or loss): “by the vow of mine order I w. you,” Meas. IV, 2, 180. “I'll give thee, ere I leave thee, so much money, to w. thee, as I am 'rested for,” Err. IV, 4, 3.
4) Used in a peculiar manner by Audrey in As III, 3, 5: your features! Lord w. us! your features! Probably she means to say: Lord warn us (cf. Warn); nevertheless this expression of a woman who is unacquainted with such words as features, has seduced M. Edd. to change God warnd us in Mids. V, 326 to God warrant us.
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