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Way, 1) a place of passage; a path, a road, a street, or anything made for passengers: “some dark deep desert, seated from the w.” Lucr. 1144. “the --s are dangerous to pass,” Gent. IV, 3, 24. Wiv. III, 1, 3. Wiv. III, 1, 3 Wiv. III, 1, 3 LLL V, 2, 926 “(foul).” Mids. II, 2, 36. Merch. II, 2, 35. V, 264 “(fair).” As II, 7, 52. Shr. IV, 1, 2 “(foul).” Wint. IV, 3, 132 “(the footpath w.).” R2 II, 3, 4. III, 3, 156. H4A II, 1, 93 “(foul).” H4B I, 1, 39. II, 2, 184. Mcb. II, 3, 21. Hml. II, 2, 277 “(beaten w.).” Lr. IV, 1, 45. 57 etc.
2) passage; any place passed or to be passed through (whether intended for it or not) as well as the act of passing: “indenting with the w.” Ven. 704. “having lost the fair discovery of her w.” Ven. 704 “it is you that have chalked forth the w. which brought us hither,” Tp. V, 203. Gent. II, 4, 94. II, 7, 8. Wiv. II, 2, 175. III, 3, 175. Meas. II, 4, 19. IV, 1, 37. IV, 1, 37 Err. IV, 3, 92 “(shut the doors against his w.).” Mids. III, 2, 417. Shr. III, 2, 237. R2 I, 3, 206. R2 I, 3, 206 R3 III, 1, 3. Ant. II, 6, 83 (show us the w.) etc. Metaphorically: “perdition shall attend you and your --s,” Tp. III, 3, 79. “prevent the --s to wail,” R2 III, 2, 179. “in the tedious --s of art,” H4A III, 1, 48. “trod the --s of glory,” H8 III, 2, 436. “he's walked the w. of nature,” H4B V, 2, 4 (== he has died). “I knew there was but one w.” H5 II, 3, 16 (i. e. he must die). “'tis the next w. to turn tailor,” H4A III, 1, 264. “is the next w. to draw new mischief on,” Oth. I, 3, 205 etc.
To bring on the w. == to accompany in setting out on a journey or walk: “that we may bring you something on the w.” Meas. I, 1, 62. “we will bring you on your w.” LLL V, 2, 883. Wint. IV, 3, 122. R2 I, 3, 304. I, 4, 2. Oth. III, 4, 197.
Come your w., and oftener come your --s, == come: “come your w., sir,” Meas. III, 2, 12. “come your --s, sir,” Meas. III, 2, 12 As I, 2, 221. II, 3, 66. All's II, 1, 96. All's II, 1, 96 Tw. II, 5, 1. Troil. III, 2, 47. Hml. I, 3, 135. Lr. II, 2, 42. Per. IV, 2, 44. Per. IV, 2, 44 IV, 6, 134. come on your --s, in the same sense: Tp. II, 2, 85 (Stephano's speech).
To give w. == a) to make room for passing, to make or suffer to pass: “to the brightest beams distracted clouds give w.” All's V, 3, 35. “open your gates and give the victors w.” John II, 324. “give w., dull clouds, to my quick curses,” R3 I, 3, 196. “I will give you w. for these your letters,” Hml. IV, 6, 32 (Qq make you w.). Hence == to make room to, to step back before another: “give them w. till he take leave, and presently after him,” Tw. III, 4, 217. “so must thy grave give w. to what's seen now,” Wint. V, 1, 98. “our country manners give our betters w.” John I, 156. “if you give w. or hedge aside,” Troil. III, 3, 157. “I will fear to catch it and give w.” Tim. IV, 3, 358. “give w. there, and go on!” Cor. II, 1, 210 (cf. w. alone: “a w. there, a w. for Caesar,” Ant. V, 2, 336). “lesser enmities may give w. to greater,” Ant. II, 1, 43. “small to greater matters must give w.” II, 2, 11. b) to yield, not to resist, to let do: “'tis a good dulness, and give it w.” Tp. I, 2, 186. “I have given w. unto this course of fortune,” Ado IV, 1, 158. “give even w. unto my rough affairs,” H4B II, 3, 2. “I gave bold w. to my authority,” V, 2, 82. “now is it manhood . . . to give the enemy w.” H6B V, 2, 76. “they shall no more prevail than we give w. to,” H8 V, 1, 144. “it must omit real necessities and give w. the while to unstable slightness,” Cor. III, 1, 147. “we gave w. unto your clusters,” IV, 6, 122. “gave him w. in all his own desires,” V, 6, 32. “security gives w. to conspiracy,” Caes. II, 3, 8. “must I give w. and room to your rash choler?” IV, 3, 39. “the cursed thoughts that nature gives w. to in repose,” Mcb. II, 1, 9. “for mine own good all causes must give w.” III, 4, 136. “'tis best to give him w.” Lr. II, 4, 301. “that nature thus gives w. to loyalty,” III, 5, 4. “all the power of his wits have given w. to his impatience,” III, 6, 5. “in each thing give him w., cross him in nothing,” Ant. I, 3, 9. “you must give w.” Cymb. I, 1, 158. c) to enter into another's thoughts or wishes, to favour, to humour: “though now the time gives w. to us,” H8 III, 2, 16. “if he slay me, he does fair justice; if he give me w., I'll do his country service,” Cor. IV, 4, 25. “if the peevish baggage would but give w. to customers,” Per. IV, 6, 20. “give him w.” V, 1, 232 (do as if you also heard the music which he pretends to hear).
Go thy w., go your w., and oftener go thy --s, go your --s, == go: “go your --s and ask . . .,” Wiv. I, 2, 1. “go your --s and play,” IV, 1, 81. “go your w. to her and say this to her,” As IV, 3, 70. “go thy --s, let the horses be well looked to,” All's IV, 5, 61. “go thy --s, old Jack, die when thou wilt,” H4A II, 4, 141. “go thy --s to a nunnery,” Hml. III, 1, 132. “go thy --s, good mariner,” Per. III, 1, 81. Implying reproach: “go thy w., thou shalt not from this grove,” Mids. II, 1, 146. “now, go thy w.” III, 2, 428. “go your --s, go your --s,” As IV, 1, 186. “go thy --s, I begin to be aweary of thee,” All's IV, 5, 59. “go thy --s, go, give that changing piece to him,” Tit. I, 309. And, on the other hand, used in a tone of exhortation or applause: “sayest thou so, old Jack? go thy --s,” Wiv. II, 2, 144. “Petruchio, go thy --s, the field is won,” Shr. IV, 5, 23. “well, go thy --s, old lad, for thou shalt ha't,” V, 2, 181. “well, go thy w.; if Sir Toby would leave drinking, thou wert as witty a piece of Eve's flesh as any,” Tw. I, 5, 29. “go thy --s, Kate,” H8 II, 4, 133. “go thy w., Hector, there's a brave man,” Troil. I, 2, 216. Troil. I, 2, 216 “go thy --s, wench, serve God,” Rom. II, 5, 45. cf. Per. IV, 6, 71.
To have w. or to have one's w. == to have free scope: “let me have w. to find this practice out,” Meas. V, 238. “let him have his w.” All's III, 6, 2. “he'll lade it dry to have his w.” H6C III, 2, 139.
To hold one's w. == to keep one's course, to go on: “let determined things to destiny hold unbewailed their w.” Ant. III, 6, 85.
To keep one's w. == to go on, not to stop: Wiv. III, 2, 1. Ado I, 1, 144. H8 II, 4, 128.
To lead the w. == to go at the head, to set the example of going: Tp. II, 2, 177. Tp. II, 2, 177 Wiv. I, 1, 318. Shr. IV, 4, 69. Tw. IV, 3, 34. H6B II, 4, 110. H6C V, 1, 112. H8 V, 5, 73. Troil. III, 3, 54. Oth. II, 3, 207. “lead's the w.” Per. V, 3, 84.
There lies your w. == go if you please; you had better go: “the door is open, sir: there lies your w.” Shr. III, 2, 212. “will you hoist sail, sir? here lies your w.” Tw. I, 5, 216. “there lies your w., due west,” III, 1, 145. cf. here lies our w. == let us go, Troil. IV, 1, 79.
To make w. == a) to give place, to make room: “make w., unruly woman,” R2 V, 2, 110. “make w. there for the princess,” H8 V, 4, 91. Cor. II, 2, 40. Tit. I, 64. Tit. I, 64 Ant. V, 2, 110. b) to form and prepare a passage: “when the w. was made and paved with gold,” H8 I, 1, 187. c) to open a path through obstacles: “through the instrument my pate made w.” Shr. II, 155. “my sword shall make w. for me,” H6B IV, 8, 62. “make cruel w. through ranks of Greekish youth,” Troil. IV, 5, 184. “I will make you w. for these letters,” Hml. IV, 6, 32 (Ff give you w.). “I have made my w. through more impediments,” Oth. V, 2, 263. d) to go, to pass: “I make w. from hence to save my life,” Shr. I, 1, 239. “making their w. with those of nobler bulk,” Troil. I, 3, 36. “follow where the game makes w.” Tit. II, 2, 24. “make a clear w. to the gods,” Tim. III, 4, 77 (die with a good conscience). e) to advance successfully: “follow me and mark what w. I make,” Wint. V, 1, 233. “the force of his own merit makes his w.” H8 I, 1, 64. “thou dost make thy w. to noble fortunes,” Lr. V, 3, 29.
To take a w. or one's w. == to set out, to go: “when I took my w.” Sonn. 48, 1. “that presently you take your w. for home,” All's II, 5, 69. “take the instant w.” Troil. III, 3, 153. “take your own w.” Cymb. I, 5, 31.
By the w. == a) while going along, on the route: “an intent that perished by the w.” Meas. V, 458. “by the w. we met my wife,” Err. V, 235. “which accidentally, or by the w. of progression, hath miscarried,” LLL IV, 2, 144 (Holofernes' speech). “by the w. let us recount our dreams,” Mids. IV, 1, 204. Merch. III, 2, 231. As III, 2, 452. Wint. IV, 4, 255. R3 II, 2, 148. IV, 5, 15. Troil. IV, 4, 114. b) by the by: “I can tell you that by the w.” Wiv. I, 4, 150. Shr. IV, 2, 115. Cymb. III, 2, 61. “I hear it by the w.” Mcb. III, 4, 130 (i. e. occasionally and indirectly). c) with of, == for the purpose of: “we come not by the w. of accusation,” H8 III, 1, 54.
In the w. == where one passes: “he strikes whate'er is in his w.” Ven. 623. “the bushes in the w.” Ven. 623 Ven. 623 “lie tumbling in my barefoot w.” Tp. II, 2, 11. Gent. I, 2, 39. Err. IV, 2, 61. Merch. V, 294. H4A V, 3, 60. Noting hinderance and obstruction: “thank God, and the good wine in thy master's w.” H6B II, 3, 99.
On the w. == in going or travelling along: H4A IV, 2, 39. V, 1, 36. H4B I, 1, 30. R3 III, 1, 4. R3 III, 1, 4 R3 III, 1, 4 IV, 1, 51. Hml. II, 2, 330. III, 1, 17. Lr. IV, 2, 2. Lr. IV, 2, 2 “you should have been well on your w. to York,” H4B II, 1, 73. “every rub is smoothed on our w.” H5 II, 2, 188. “let's on our w. in silent sort,” H6C IV, 2, 28. “light thee on thy w. to Mantua,” Rom. III, 5, 15. “she is two months on her w.” LLL V, 2, 679 (i. e. with child. Costard's speech).
Out of the w. == a) making room, so as to be no hinderance: “out of our w., I say,” Tp. I, 1, 29. “to draw the Moor out of the w.” Oth. III, 1, 40. “nor send you out o'the w.” IV, 2, 7. b) astray; quite beside the mark: “lead me out of my w.” Tp. II, 2, 7. “we are much out o'the w.” LLL IV, 3, 76. “it is clean out of the w.” Oth. I, 3, 366. c) gone, lost: “is't lost? is't gone? speak, is it out o'the way?” Oth. III, 4, 80.
3) direction, side: “he turns his lips another w.” Ven. 90. “which w. shall she turn?” Ven. 90 “this w. she runs,” Ven. 90 “a thousand spleens bear her a thousand --s,” Ven. 90 “my consent goes not that w.” Wiv. III, 2, 79. “I am that w. going to temptation, where prayers cross,” Meas. II, 2, 158. “which w. looks he?” Ado I, 3, 55. “you that w., we this w.” LLL V, 2, 941. “that w. goes the game,” Mids. III, 2, 289 (== now I see your drift). “fairies, be gone, and be all --s away,” IV, 1, 46 (O. Edd. always). “I shot his fellow the selfsame w.” Merch. I, 1, 142. “this w. the coverlet, another w. the sheets,” Shr. IV, 1, 205. “I come one w. of the Plantagenets,” John V, 6, 11 (i. e. by the father's side). “turn not thy scorns this w.” H6A II, 4, 77. “turn thy edged sword another w.” III, 3, 52. “now sways it this w. . . . now sways it that w.” H6C II, 5, 5. H6C II, 5, 5 “plucked all gaze his w.” Cor. I, 3, 8. “nothing, neither w.” Hml. V, 2, 312 (on neither side). “to avert your liking a more worthier w.” Lr. I, 1, 214. “though he be painted one w. like a Gorgon, the other w. 's a Mars,” Ant. II, 5, 116. “stands upon the swell . . . and neither w. inclines,” III, 2, 50. “apes . . . would chatter this w.” Cymb. I, 6, 40.
This w. often == here, hither: “this w. comes he with it presently,” Gent. III, 1, 42. “come a little nearer this --s,” Wiv. II, 2, 47. 50 (Mrs Quickly's speech). “yonder he is coming this w.” III, 1, 27. III, 1, 27 Err. V, 120. Tw. I, 5, 324. Wint. IV, 4, 20. H6B I, 3, 2. H6C IV, 5, 10. Tim. I, 2, 137. Mcb. IV, 1, 45.
Metaphorically, == tendency, character, kind: “men of his w. should be most liberal,” H8 I, 3, 61. “the w. of our profession is against it,” III, 1, 157. “you're a gentleman of mine own w.” V, 1, 28.
And == respect, point of view: “you are gone both --s,” Merch. III, 5, 20. “their residence, both in reputation and profit, was better both --s,” Hml. II, 2, 345. “one w. I like this well, . . . another w. the news is not so tart,” Lr. IV, 2, 83. Lr. IV, 2, 83 any w. == in any respect, at all: “if the wind blow any w. from shore,” Err. III, 2, 153. “if I can cross him any w.” Ado I, 3, 70. “uncertain of the issue any w.” H4A I, 1, 61. “if that the king have any w. your good deserts forgot,” IV, 3, 46. “will not any w. dishonour me,” H6A V, 3, 102. “nor to betray you any w. to sorrow,” H8 III, 1, 56. every w. == in every respect: “he will every w. be mocked,” Wiv. V, 3, 20. “I bless myself every w.” Ado I, 3, 71. “my fortunes every w. as fairly ranked,” Mids. I, 1, 101. is the young Dauphin “every w. complete,” John II, 433. “you wrong me every w.” Caes. IV, 3, 55. no w. == not at all: “if the gentle spirit of moving words can no w. change you,” Gent. V, 4, 56. “I think nobly of the soul and no w. approve this opinion,” Tw. IV, 2, 59. “you must in no w. say he is covetous,” Cor. I, 1, 43. “it comes from them to you and no w. from yourselves,” Cor. I, 1, 43 that w. == in that respect, in that point: “no hope that w. is another w. so high a hope,” Tp. II, 1, 240. “he is something peevish that w.” Wiv. I, 4, 14. “too crabbed that w.” Meas. III, 2, 105. “he was not inclined that w.” Meas. III, 2, 105 “all that offend that w.” II, 1, 252. “I shall lessen God's sending that w.” Ado II, 1, 24. Wint. IV, 3, 116. H4A II, 4, 401. Cymb. I, 1, 137. I, 4, 101. this w. == in this point: “our breach of duty this w. is business of state,” H8 II, 2, 69.
In w. of or in the w. of == 1) with respect to, in point of, concerning, the point in question being: “Hector's opinion is this in w. of truth,” Troil. II, 2, 189. “one that wouldst be a bawd, in w. of good service,” Lr. II, 2, 21. “in the w. of bargain . . . I'll cavil on the ninth part of a hair,” H4A III, 1, 139. “that in the w. of loyalty . . . dare mate a sounder man,” H8 III, 2, 272. “what my tongue can do i'the w. of flattery,” Cor. III, 2, 137. 2) with a view to, for the purpose of (the modern by way of): “a kind of insinuation . . . in w. of explication,” LLL IV, 2, 14. “they'll not show their teeth in w. of smile,” Merch. I, 1, 55. “never to speak to lady . . . in w. of marriage,” II, 1, 42. “never to woo a maid in w. of marriage,” II, 9, 13. “I will not open my lips so wide as a bristle may enter in w. of thy excuse,” Tw. I, 5, 3. “I do beseech you, as in w. of taste, to give me now a little benefit,” Troil. III, 3, 13. “so 'tis put on me, and that in w. of caution,” Hml. I, 3, 95. “to speak a good word for my master . . . in the w. of marriage,” Wiv. I, 4, 89. “I defy all angels . . . but in the w. of honesty,” II, 2, 75 (but cf. sub 6). “he will never in the w. of waste attempt us again,” IV, 2, 226. “in the w. of argument,” H5 III, 2, 104. “as a woman should not do, but in the w. of honesty,” Ant. V, 2, 253.
4) length of space, distance: “the w. is but short,” LLL III, 57. “it is not half w. to her heart,” Shr. I, 1, 62. “which is a great w. growing on the south,” Caes. II, 1, 107. “half w. down hangs one,” Lr. IV, 6, 14. “'tis but a little w. that I can bring you,” Oth. III, 4, 199. Metaphorically: “think him a great w. fool,” All's I, 1, 112 (== in a high degree). “if I cannot recover your niece, I am a foul w. out,” Tw. II, 3, 201.
5) proceeding, course, means: “to her will frame all thy --s,” Pilgr. 323. “my best w. is to creep under his gaberdine,” Tp. II, 2, 39. “the best w. is to slander Valentine,” Gent. III, 2, 31. Wiv. II, 1, 67. “have you any w. then to unfool me again?” IV, 2, 120. “admit no other w. to save his life,” Meas. II, 4, 88. “'twere the cheaper w.” Meas. II, 4, 88 “my w. is now to hie home to his house,” Err. IV, 3, 93. “you go not the w. to examine,” Ado IV, 2, 35 (the sexton's speech). “this was a w. to thrive,” Merch. I, 3, 90. “indirect crooked --s,” H4B IV, 5, 185. “I think it is our w., if we will keep in favour with the king, to be her men,” R3 I, 1, 78. “those cold --s . . . are very poisonous where the disease is violent,” Cor. III, 1, 220. “I knew it the most general w.” Tim. II, 2, 209. “that's the w.” Oth. II, 3, 393; cf. Meas. V, 280.
6) manner, mode: “a thousand --s he seeks to mend the hurt,” Ven. 477. “pausing for means to mourn some newer w.” Lucr. 1365. “wherefore do not you a mightier w. make war . . . upon time,” Sonn. 16, 1. “pity move my father to be inclined my w.” Tp. I, 2, 447. “I will one w. or other make you amends,” Wiv. III, 1, 89. “after this downright w. of creation,” Meas. III, 2, 112. “that's the w.” V, 280 (cf. Oth. II, 3, 393). “you must wear it one w.” Ado II, 1, 198. use it (your hand) “some other w.” IV, 1, 329. “it must appear in other --s than words,” Merch. V, 140. “and this w. will I take upon me to wash your liver as clean,” As III, 2, 442. V, 1, 63. All's V, 3, 276 “(by none of all these --s).” Wint. IV, 4, 33. Wint. IV, 4, 33 John I, 181 (thou wast got in the w. of honesty; cf. Wiv. II, 2, 75 and Ant. V, 2, 253). H4B IV, 5, 127. Troil. IV, 5, 71. Cor. V, 6, 58 “(after your w. his tale pronounced).” Tit. II, 1, 119. Tim. I, 2, 55 (let it flow this way, == in this manner, i. e. with full cups). Caes. II, 2, 91. III, 1, 192. Lr. IV, 3, 21 (her smiles and tears were like, a better way; i. e. resembled sunshine and rain, but in a more beautiful manner). Ant. I, 3, 10. V, 2, 359. Cymb. IV, 4, 4 etc. how and which w., pleonastically: “how and which w. I may bestow myself,” Gent. III, 1, 87. “how and which w. you will,” All's IV, 3, 157. “how or which way to order these affairs,” R2 II, 2, 109. “how or which way should they first break in?” H6A II, 1, 71. H6A II, 1, 71
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