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Weak, 1) having little physical strength (either by nature, or in consequence of any thing that impairs the natural force): Ven. 1145. Lucr. 555. 1242 (== soft, pliant, impressible?). Lucr. 555 Lucr. 555 Pilgr. 163. LLL I, 1, 276 (the --er vessel; cf. “Vessel).” Merch. II, 1, 34. IV, 1, 115. As II, 4, 6. II, 7, 132.* Shr. V, 2, 165. Shr. V, 2, 165 All's II, 1, 140. All's II, 1, 140 II, 3, 39. III, 4, 41. R2 III, 2, 62. H4B II, 4, 66. H4B II, 4, 66 H4B II, 4, 66 H6A II, 3, 23. Troil. I, 3, 43 “(w. untimbered sides).” Caes. I, 3, 108 “(w. straws).” Mcb. IV, 3, 16. Cymb. III, 6, 37 etc. Applied to troops too small in number or not sufficiently prepared: All's IV, 3, 151. R2 II, 3, 154. H4A IV, 4, 19. H5 III, 6, 164. H6A I, 1, 158. III, 2, 7. IV, 4, 16. H6C II, 3, 13. IV, 5, 7. cf. All's I, 1, 127. John V, 7, 78.
2) powerless in operation, inefficacious: “my will is strong, past reason's w. removing,” Lucr. 243. w. sights (== eyes) Compl. 214. “w. masters though ye be,” Tp. V, 41. “means much --er,” Tp. V, 41 “her w. prayers,” Mids. III, 2, 250. “a w. bond holds you,” Mids. III, 2, 250 “w. wind,” John V, 2, 87. H4B IV, 5, 100. Cor. V, 2, 50. so w. a composition (small beer) H4B II, 2, 10. “a w. and niggardly projection,” H5 II, 4, 46. “their villany goes against my w. stomach,” III, 2, 56. “the w. list of a country's fashion,” V, 2, 295. “my ancient incantations are too w.” H6A V, 3, 27. “my title's w.” H6C I, 1, 134. III, 3, 145. “my w. oratory,” R3 III, 1, 37. “a w. and colder palate,” Troil. IV, 4, 7. “my w. words,” Caes. I, 2, 176. “motives,” II, 1, 116. Mcb. I, 2, 15 etc.
3) slight, inconsiderable, little: so strong a prop to support so w. a burden, Ven. Ded. Mcb. I, 2, 15 “my love is strengthened, though more w. in seeming,” Sonn. 102, 1. “this w. impress of love,” Gent. III, 2, 6. “this w. and idle theme,” Mids. V, 434. “a w. and worthless satisfaction,” H5 III, 6, 141. “such things as might offend the --est spleen,” Troil. II, 2, 128. “holding a w. supposal of our worth,” Hml. I, 2, 18. “mine own w. merits,” Oth. III, 3, 187. one (life) “is too poor, too w. for my revenge,” Oth. III, 3, 187
4) wanting spirit and moral power: to whose (his soul's temple) “w. ruins muster troops of cares,” Lucr. 720. “in thy w. hive a wandering wasp hath crept,” Lucr. 720 “to be afeard of my deserving were but a w. disabling of myself,” Merch. II, 7, 30. “w. fear,” H4A IV, 3, 11. “so w. of courage and in judgment,” H6C IV, 1, 12. “in this w. piping time of peace,” R3 I, 1, 24. “the w. wanton Cupid,” Troil. III, 3, 222. “a w. slave,” Rom. I, 1, 17.
5) feeble of mind, wanting understanding and discernment: “to be of such a w. and silly mind,” Ven. 1016. “the w. brain's forgeries,” Lucr. 460. “this lord of w. remembrance,” Tp. II, 1, 232. “made wit with musing w.” Gent. I, 1, 69. “my conceit, smothered in errors, feeble, shallow, w.” Err. III, 2, 35. “their sense thus w.” Mids. III, 2, 27. “has a most w. pia mater,” Tw. I, 5, 123. “had our w. spirits ne'er been higher reared,” Wint. I, 2, 72. “sick interpreters, once w. ones,” H8 I, 2, 82. conceit in --est bodies (== persons) “strongest works,” Hml. III, 4, 114 (or in a physical sense?).
Almost == stupid: “a very w. monster,” Tp. II, 2, 148. “her wit values itself so highly that to her all matter else seems w.” Ado III, 1, 54. “fancies too w. for boys,” Wint. III, 2, 182. “a w. mind and an able body,” H4B II, 4, 273. “that the --er sort may wish good Marcius home again,” Cor. IV, 6, 69. “it were very w. dealing,” Rom. II, 4, 180 (the nurse's speech). “play the god with his w. function,” Oth. II, 3, 354.
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