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Weary, adj. 1) tired, fatigued: Ven. 495. Ven. 495 Ven. 495 Ven. 495 Ven. 495 Lucr. 1542. Lucr. 1542 Sonn. 7, 9. 27, 1. Gent. II, 7, 35. Err. I, 2, 7. Err. I, 2, 7 LLL V, 2, 194. LLL V, 2, 194 Mids. III, 2, 442. As II, 4, 1. As II, 4, 1 II, 7, 130. Shr. IV, 1, 4. Tw. III, 3, 21. John V, 5, 18. R2 I, 3, 265. II, 3, 16. V, 3, 105. H4A II, 3, 87. H4B II, 2, 1. IV, 5, 3. V, 5, 149. H5 V, 1, 89. H6A IV, 6, 27. H6C II, 3, 45. R3 IV, 4, 112 (Qq w. neck, Ff wearied head). V, 3, 19. H8 III, 2, 363. IV, 2, 22. Cor. I, 9, 91. Rom. V, 3, 118. Lr. II, 2, 177. II, 4, 89. Cymb. III, 4, 115. III, 6, 36. The cause with of: “you sunburnt sicklemen, of August w.” Tp. IV, 134. “as you are w. of the weight,” R3 I, 2, 31.
2) tired, impatient of the continuance of sth.: “I am longer to live most w.” Cor. IV, 5, 101. With of: “w. of rest,” Ven. 853. “of the world,” Ven. 853 Mids. V, 255 (Q1 aweary). As III, 2, 302. R2 V, 5, 104. H4B III, 1, 48. IV, 1, 197. H6A I, 2, 26. R3 V, 3, 329.
3) sick, disgusted in general: “a true-devoted pilgrim is not w. to measure kingdoms with his feeble steps,” Gent. II, 7, 9. “so w. with disasters,” Mcb. III, 1, 112. “put on what w. negligence you please,” Lr. I, 3, 12. “wherein we are not destitute for want, but w. for the staleness,” Per. V, 1, 58. With of: “I am w. of this charge,” Tim. III, 4, 25. “life being w. of these worldly bars,” Caes. I, 3, 96. “he that keeps nor crust nor crum, w. of all, shall want some,” Lr. I, 4, 218.
4) tiresome, causing weariness: “ere he arrive his w. noontide prick,” Lucr. 781. “the w. time she cannot entertain,” Lucr. 781 “my w. travel's end,” Sonn. 50, 2. “w. night,” 61, 2. Gent. I, 1, 31. LLL V, 2, 197. Mids. III, 2, 431. V, 381. R2 I, 3, 49. H5 IV Chor. H5 IV Chor. R3 III, 1, 3. H8 II, 1, 133. Troil. III, 2, 123. Tit. I, 28. Mcb. I, 3, 22. Hml. III, 1, 77. not to be w. with you == not to weary you, not to be tedious: Meas. I, 4, 25.
5) irksome, disgusting: “the --est and most loathed worldly life,” Meas. III, 1, 129. “seek the w. beds of people sick,” LLL V, 2, 832. “how w., stale, flat . . . seem to me all the uses of this world,” Hml. I, 2, 133. “O w. reckoning,” Oth. III, 4, 176. cf. H8 II, 1, 133. Hml. III, 1, 77. Hence the following expression, which has much puzzled the commentators: doth it (pride) “not flow as hugely as the sea, till that the w. very means do ebb?” As II, 7, 73 (irksome and hateful, as they cannot be dispensed with, and yet are so soon exhausted. German: bis dass es mit den leidigen Mitteln selbst auf die Neige geht).
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