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PARTICIPLES AND VERBALS: Participle implied

The Participle is sometimes implied in the case of a simple word, such as "being."

“I have heard him oft maintain it to be fit that sons (being) at
perfect age and fathers declining, the father should be as ward to the
son.

“And be well contented
To make your house our tower. You (being) a brother of us,
It fits we thus proceed, or else no witness
Would come against you.

i.e. "Since you are our brother." (Or (?) "though you were our brother, it [would be and] is fit to proceed thus.")

“(Those locks are) often known
To be the dowry of a second head,
The skull that bred them (being) in the sepulchre.

We retain this use in antithetical phrases, such as "face to face," "sword against sword," but we should rarely introduce an adjective into such an antithetical compound. Shakespeare, however, has

“And answer me declined sword 'gainst sword.

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