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CONTRACTIONS I unaccented in a polysyllable dropped

I in the middle of a trisyllable, if unaccented, is frequently dropped, or so nearly dropped as to make it a favourite syllable in trisyllabic feet.

(1) “Judí | cious púnish | ment! 'Twás | this flésh | begót.” Lear, iii. 4. 76; M. for M. i. 3. 39. “Our rév | (e)rend cárdi | nal cárried. | Líke it, | your
gráce.” Hen. VIII. i. 1. 100, 102, 105, &c. “With whóm | the Ként | ishmén | will wíll | ingly ríse.” 3 Hen. VI. i. 2. 41. “Which áre | the móv | ers óf | a lánguish | ing déath.” Cymb. i. 5. 9. “My thóught | whose múr | der yét | is bút | fantástical.Macbeth, i. 3. 139. “That lóv'd | your fáther: | the rési | due óf | your fórtune.” A. Y. L. ii. 7. 196.Prómising | to bríng | it tó | the Pór | pentíne.” C. of E. v. 1. 222. So 1 Hen. VI. iv. 1. 166.

(2) Very frequently before ly: “The méa | sure thén | of óne | is éasi | ly tóld.” L. L. L. v. 2. 190. “His shórt | thick néck | cannót | be eás | ily hármed.” V. and A. 627.Préttily | methóught | did pláy | the ór | atór.” 1 Hen. VI. iv. 1. 175.

(3) And before ty: “Such bóld | hostíli | ty, téach | ing his ('s) dú | teous lánd.” 1 Hen. IV. iv. 3. 44. “Of gód- | like ámi | ty, whích | appéars | most stróngly.” M. of V. iii. 4. 3. “A'riel | and áll | his quáli | ty.
Prosp. Hást | thou, spírit?” Tempest, i. 2. 193. “Of smóoth | civíli | ty yét | am I ín | land bréd.” A. Y. L. ii. 7. 96. Compare BUTLER, Hudibras, part ii. cant. 3. 945:

Which ín | their dárk | fatál | 'ties lúrk | ing
At dés | tin'd pér | iods fáll | a-wórk | ing.

This explains the apparent Alexandrines: “Thóu wilt | prove hís. | Táke him | to prí | son, ófficer.M. for M. iii. 2. 32. “Some trícks | of dés | perát | ion, áll | but máriners.Temp. i. 1. 211. “One dówle | that's ín | my plúme, | my féll | ow mínisters.Temp. iii. 2. 65, v. 1. 28; M. for M. iv. 5. 6; Macb. i. 5. 49. “Thís is | the gént | lemán | I tóld | your ládyship.T. G. of V. ii. 4. 87. “A vírt | uous gént | lewóm | an, míld | and beaútiful.T. G. of V. iv. 4. 184. “And té | diousnéss | the límbs | and oút | ward flóurishes.Hamlet, ii. 2. 91.

Sometimes these contractions are expressed in writing, as "par'lous," Rich. III. ii. 4. 35. This is always a colloquial form.

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