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CONTRACTIONS -es or -s dropped after s, se, ce, ge

The plural and possessive cases of nouns in which the singular ends in s, se, ss, ce, and ge, are frequently written, and still more frequently pronounced, without the additional syllable: “A's the | dead | cár | casses óf | unbúr | ied mén.” Coriol. iii. 3. 122. “Thínking | upón | his sér | vices tóok | from yóu.” Ib. ii. 2. 231. “Their sénse | are [Fol. sic] shút.” Macbeth, v. 1. 29. “My sénse | are stópped.” Sonn. 112. “These vérse.DANIEL. “I'll tó | him; hé | is híd | at Láwr | ence' céll.” R. and J. iii. 2. 141. “Great kings of France and England! That I have laboured,
Your míght | inéss | on bóth | parts bést | can wítness.” Hen. V. v. 2. 28.

"Place" is probably used for "places" in “The frésh | springs, bríne- | pits, bár | ren pláce | and
fértile.” Tempest, i. 2. 338. “These twó | Antíph | olús [Folio], | these twó | so líke.” C. of E. v. 1. 357. “Are there balance?M. of V. iv. 1. 255. “(Here) have I, thy schoolmaster, made thee more profit
Than óth | er prín | cess [Folìo] cán | that háve | more
tíme.” Temp. i. 2. 173. “Sits on his horse back at mine hostess door.” K. J. ii. 1. 289 (Folio). “Looked pále | when théy | did héar | of Clár | ence (Folio)
déath.” Rich. III. ii. 1. 137, iii. 1. 144. Probably the s is not sounded (horse is the old plural) in “And Duncan's horses (a thing most strange and certain).” Macbeth, ii. 4. 14. “Lies in their purses, and whoso empties them.” Rich. II. ii. 2. 130.

Even after ge the s was often suppressed, even where printed. Thus: “How many ways shall Carthage's glory grow!” SURREY'S Æneid IV. (Walker).

But often the s was not written. So “In violating marriage sacred law.” Edward III. (1597 A.D.) (LAMB.)

The s is perhaps not pronounced in “Conjéct | (u)ral márr | iages); mák | ing párt | ies stróng.” Coriol. i. 1. 198. “Are brá | zen ím | ages óf | canón (491) | iz'd sáints.” 2 Hen. VI. i. 3. 63. “The ím | ages óf | revólt | and flý | ing óff!” Lear, ii. 4. 91. “O'ff with | his són | George's héad.” Rich. III. v. 3. 344. “Létters | should nót | be knówn, | riches póv | ertý.” Tempest, ii. 1. 150.

This may perhaps explain the apparent Alexandrines: “I próm | is'd yóu | redréss | of thése | same griévances.2 Hen. IV. iv. 2. 113. “This déi | ty in | my bós | om twén | ty cónsciences.Temp. ii. 1. 278. “And stráight | discláim | their tóngues? | Whát are | your
óffices?Coriol. iii. 1. 35. “Popíl | ius Lé | na spéaks | not óf | our púr | poses.J. C. iii. 1. 23. “She lév | ell'd át | our púr | poses, ánd | being (470) róyal,” A. and C. v. 2. 339. (or "| our púrposes), | and bé | ing róyal.") “A thíng | most brú | tish, I' | endówed | thy púrposes.Tempest, i. 2. 357. “Nor whén | she púrposes | retúrn. | Beséech | your híghness.” Cymb. iv. 3. 15. “As blánks, | benévo | lences ánd | I wót | not whát.” Rich. II. ii. 1. 250. “My sérv | ices whích | I have ('ve) dóne | the Sígn | iorý.” Othello, i. 2. 18. “These pípes | and thése | convéy | ances óf | our blóod.” Coriol. v. 1. 54.Profésses | to persuáde | the kíng | his són's | alíve.” Temp. ii. 1. 236.

Either "whom I" is a detached foot (499) or s is mute in “Whom I', | with thís | obéd | ient stéel, | three ínches of it
(inch of 't).” Tempest, ii. 1. 285.

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