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VARIABLE SYLLABLES. Ed final, mute and sonant in the same line

Ed final is often mute and sonant in the same line. Just as one superlative inflection -est does duty for two closely connected adjectives (398): “The generous and gravest citizens.” M. for M. iv. 6. 13. and the adverbial inflection ly does duty for two adverbs (397): “And she will speak most bitterly and strange.” M. for M. v. 1. 36. so, when two participles ending in -ed are closely connected by "and," the ed in one is often omitted in pronunciation. “Despís'd, | distréss | ed, hát | ed, márt | yr'd, kílled.” R. and J. iv. 5. 59. “We have wíth | a léav | en'd ánd | prepár | ed chóice.” M. for M. i. 1. 52. “To thís | unlóok'd | for, ún | prepár | ed pómp.” K. J. ii. 1. 560.

In the following the -ed sonant precedes: “That wére | embátt | ailéd | and ránk'd | in Ként.” K. J. iv. 2. 200. “We áre | impréss | ed ánd | engág'd | to fíght.” 1 Hen. IV. i. 1. 21. “For thís | they háve | engróss | ed ánd | pil'd úp.” 2 Hen. IV. iv. 5. 71. “Thou cháng | ed ánd | self-cóu | er'd thíng, | for sháme.” Lear, iv. 2. 62.

At the end of a line ed is often sounded after er: “Which hís | hell-góv | ern'd árm | hath bútc | heréd.Rich. III. i. 2. 74.

See J. C. ii. 1. 208; iii. 1. 17; iii. 2. 7, 10; iv. 1. 47; v. 1. 1. So Rich. III. iii. 7. 136; iv. 3. 17; v. 3. 92; M. N. D. iii. 2. 18, &c. This perhaps arises in part from the fact that "er" final in itself (478) has a lengthened sound approaching to a dissyllable.

Ed is very frequently pronounced in the participles of words ending in fy, "glorify," &c. “Most pút | rifí | ed córe, | so fáir | withóut.” Tr. and Cr. v. 9. 1. “My mórt | ifí | ed spírit. | Now bíd | me rún.” J. C. ii. 1. 324. “Váughan | and áll | that háve | miscárr | iéd.Rich. III. v. 1. 5. “The Frénch | and E'ng | lish thére | miscár | riéd.M. of V. ii. 8. 29. “That cáme | too lág | to sée | him bú | riéd.Ib. ii. 1. 90. So frequently in other Elizabethan authors. Also when preceded by rn, rm, "turned," "confirmed," &c., and in "followed:" “As théy | us tó | our trénch | es fóll | owéd.Coriol. i. 4. 42.

On the other hand, -ed is mute in “By whát | by-páths | and ín | diréct | crook'd wáys.” 2 Hen. IV. iv. 5. 185.

In “Warder. We dó | no óth | erwíse | than wé | are will'd.
Glou. Who wíll | ed yóu? | Or whóse | will stánds |
but míne,” 1 Hen. VI. i. 3. 11. it would seem that the latter "willed" is the more emphatic of the two, and it will probably be found that in many cases where two participles are connected, the more emphatic has ed sonant. Thus the former "banished" is the more emphatic of the two in “Hence bán | ishéd | is bánish'd fróm | the wórld.” R. and J. iii. 3. 19.

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