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DONGALL.

DONGALL the sonne of king Souathus was recciued to succéed by the common consent
Dongall succéedeth after Conuall. A seuere punisher of malefactors. Alpine constrained by the nobles, taketh vpon him to be crowned king. Alpine vnwilling to receiue the crowne fled. of the states of all the realme, a man of singular wisdome and great knowledge. But for that he was somewhat seuere in punishing the misordered behauiours of the nobilitie, & misgouerned youth of his realme, diuers of the nobles conspired against him, forcing one Alpine the sonne of Achaius to make claime to the crowne; who perceiuing there was no remedie, but either to follow their minds, or else to be murthered amongest them, consented to go with them into Argile, where they purposed to crowne him king sitting vpon the chaire of marble, according to the manner. Howbeit, at his comming into that countrie, he found means to conuey himselfe from amongest them, least through his means the quiet state of his countrie should be brought into trouble: and foorthwith being escaped out of their hands with a few other that were priuie to his intention, he maketh all the hast he could, till he came to the presence of Dongall, who receiued him in most io full wise, promising hat if it should be Alpine was ioifullie receiued of Dongall. thought necessarie by the states of the realme, he would gladlie resigne vnto him his whole crowne and dignitie, desirous of nothing more than to sée the aduancement of the house of Achaius. Such (saith he) were the merits of that famous prince towards the preseruation of the Scotish common wealth, that it were too much wickednesse to go about to defraud his issue of the inheritance of the realme.

Alpine giuing the king most hartie thanks, besought him to continue in the administration, Alpine his excuse vnto Dongall. drawing God and the world to witnesse, that he minded nothing lesse than to be about to claime the gouernement of the kingdome so long as he liued. For as touching his offense, in that he had gathered an armie, and led the same into Argile, it was not his fault, but the conspirators which had forced him thereto, being determined to haue slaine him, if he had not consented vnto their desires. Within thrée yeares after, there came messengers from the Dongall maketh an armie against the rebels. rebels to excuse themselues also, & to put all the fault in Alpine: but king Dongall giuing small credit to their forged words, gathereth his power, and maketh such spéed towards the place where he vnderstood the said rebels were assembled togither, that he was vpon them yer they had anie knowledge of his setting forwards. So that before they could make anie shift to escape out of danger, which they went about to doo, they were apprehended, and immediatlie condemned and put to death. Which execution put other presumptuous persons in feare, so that the state of the realme remained afterward a great deale more in quier.

Whilest things passed thus in Scotland, Eganus the second sonne of Hungus the Pictish Eganus murdereth his brother. king, found means to murder his brother Dorstolorgus, to the end he might reigne in his place: and through support of some of the nobilitie he atteined to his purpose. And for that he would assure himselfe the more firmelie in the estate, he frankelie bestowed his fathers treasure amongest his lords and chiefest péers of his realme, and tooke to wife Brenna the king of Mercia his daughter, whom his brother the forenamed Dorstolorgus had maried, that thereby he might asswage the said king of Mercia his displeasure, which otherwise he should happilie haue conceiued for the death of his other sonne in law the same Dorstolorgus. His feare was great on ech side, and therefore had small affiance in anie person, Eganus liueth in feare. doubting lest one or other should séeke to reuenge his brothers death. He durst neuer go anie waies foorth abroad without a gard of men of warre about him, whome he had woone & made his fast friends by his passing great largesse and bountifull liberalitie. At length yet, his wife to reuenge hir former husbands death, found means to strangle him as he lay one Eganus is strangled of his quéene. night fast asléepe, hauing droonke a little too much in the euening before, and in this sort he came to his end, after he had reigned much what about the space of two yeares.

Thus both Eganus & Dorstolorgus being made away, without leauing anie issue behind them, forsomuch as now there remained none of the posteritie of Hungus to succéed in gouernement of the Pictish kingdome, Alpine nephue to the said Hungus, by his sister Fergusiana, with the aduise of king Dongall, made claime therevnto, and thervpon sent his An ambassador sent vnto the Picts. messengers vnto the lords and peeres of the Pictish dominion, to require them on his behalfe, that he might be receiued to the gouernement of the kingdome due vnto him by lawfull inheritance, as they well vnderstood: and that if they throughlie considered of the thing, they might perceiue it was the prouision of almightie God, that for want of lawfull succession lineallie descended from Hungus, now to succéed in the estate of the Pictish kingdome, by this meanes both the nations Scots and Picts should be ioined in one, to the abolishing of all such mortall warres, as by discord and contention might arise betwixt those two people, in like sort as before time there had done, to the great perill and danger of both their vtter ruines.

The Pictish nobilitie, hauing knowledge that these messengers with such kind of message The Picts chose Feredeth to be king. should shortlie come from Alpine, with generall consent and whole agreement, chose one Feredeth to be their king, a man of great authoritie amongst them, supposing this to be a meane to defeat Alpines title, and that thereby he should séeme to be excluded from any further claime. Within few daies after, came vnto Camelon the Scotish ambassadors, where Feredeth The ambassadors come into the court. with his nobles at that present were assembled: they being admitted therefore to declare their message, when they began to enter into their matter of the right which Alpine had to the kingdome of the Picts, the people would not suffer them to proceed anie further therein, but began to make such an vprore, that to appease the noise, Feredeth himselfe tooke vpon him to make answer vnto the ambassadors: and thervpon commanding silence, declared vnto them that the Picts neither might nor ought to admit any stranger to reigne ouer them: for King Feredeth his answer vnto the Scotish ambassadors. there was an ancient law among them, of most high authoritie, that in case of necessitie they might transpose the crowne from house to house: and further, that by the same law there was an ordenance decréed, that if anie man were once made and created king, he might not be deposed during his naturall life. And therfore though it were so, that Alpine were the nephue of Hungus by his sister Fergusiana: yet bicause he was a stranger borne, and considering withall, that the people by their full authoritie had translated the regall administration vnto an other house, of the which one was alreadie proclamed and inuested king, there was no reason now, why Alpine should make anie further claime or demand vnto the kingdome.

Vpon the messengers returne home with this answer, Dongall shewed himselfe to be in no Dongall his displeasure with the Picts answer. Ambassadors sent againe. small chafe, that the Picts should thus go about by such subtill arguments and contriued inuentions to defraud Alpine of his right. And therevpon the second time he sent his ambassadors vnto them, requiring them either to doo him reason without anie further surmised cauillations; either else within thrée moneths space after to looke for open warres at the Scotishmens hands. These ambassadors passing foorth on their iourneie, at their approching vnto Ambassadors are not receiued. Camelon, certeine sergeants at armes met them, and did forbid them to enter the citie: also they further commanded them in name of Feredeth their king to auoid out of the confines of his dominions within foure daies space, vpon paine of death.

The ambassadors being terrefied with such maner of inhibitions, they went no further: Warre is pronounced vnto the Picts. but yet according as they had in commission, they pronounced the warre in the name of Alpine and Dongall, requiring those that thus came to méet them, to giue signification therof vnto their maister Feredeth, and to the whole Pictish nation; and so returned home the same way they came. Then did the Scotish lords repaire vnto Dongall, who at the same time laie in Carrike castell, and there taking counsell for the maintenance of these warres, not one was found amongest them which offered not to spend both life, lands, & goods in Alpines iust quarell. By this means was great preparation made on both sides for the warre, the Scots The Scots willingly giue themselues vnto the war. minding to set Alpine in his right, and the Picts determining not to receiue any prince of a strange nation to reigne ouer them. But whilest Dongall goeth about to prouide all things readie for his enterprise, he chanced to be drowned in the riuer of Speie, as he was about to passe the same in a bote. This mishap chanced him in the sixt yéere of his reigne, and after the birth of our Sauiour 830. His bodie was buried in Colmekill, with all funerall obsequies.

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