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The commendation and praise of Robert Fitzstephans, and of his cousins.

WHAT shall we speake or saie, how well Robert Fitzstephans and his sonnes haue deserued? What of Maurice Fitzgerald? What shall I saie of Robert of Barrie, a man verie honest and valiant, whose worthie commendations by the premisses are to be knowne? What shall be said of Miles of Cogan, the nephue vnto Fitzstephans and Maurice, who as he came ouer with the first, so in commendation and for his seruice deserueth to be the chéefe and first? What shall we saie of Robert Fitzhenrie, & the brother vnto Meilerius, who if he had not so soone beene dead and cut, he would doubtlesse haue béene nothing behind his brother? What shall we speake of Reimond of Kantune & of Robert Barrie the yoonger, they both were verie worthie, tall, handsome, and worthie men? What also shall be said of Reimond Fitzhugh, who although he were but of a little stature, yet for his honestie & prudence not to be forgotten? These thrée lastlie spoken of for their valiantnesse and prowesse doone in the parties of Desmond, deserue great honor and commendation, and great is the pittie that through too much hardinesse their daies were so shortened, and their time so cut off? What did also a number of our gentlemen of the same their kindred & cousenage descrue, whose noble acts were such, and deserued such a perpetuall famne and memorie, that if I had a hundred toongs, a hundred mouthes, and so manie voices of yron; yet could I not vtter and at full declare their worthinesse and deserts. O kindred, O nation, which in double respects art noble! for of the Troians by a naturall disposition thou art valiant, of the French nation thou art most expert and skilfull of armes and chiualrie. O worthie nation and kindred! which of thy selfe art sufficient and able to haue conquered anie nation, if cnuie and malice had not maligned at thy worthinesse. Well then Reimond had taken order for the kéeping of the citie, and had well vittelled the same, he left therein a garison of his owne men, fiftie gentlemen, two hundred horssemen, and two hundred bowmen; ouer whome he appointed Miles of S. Dauids his coosine to be leiutenant: and so as a noble conqueror he safelie returned into the borders of Leinster. But sée the nature of enuie, who neuer ceaseth to persecute vertue. For Heruie of Mount Maurice, notwithstanding by meanes of the late affinitie he were thought to be a good fréend, yet could he not forget his old malicious mind and wicked deuises: for still he secretlie from time to time sent his messengers and letters to the king of England, and full vntrulie did aduertise the state, euent, and successe of all things, affirming that Reimond contrarie to the kings honor and his owne allegiance, had determined to haue assumed and chalenged vnto himselfe not onelie the citie of Limerike, but also the whole land of Ireland. And to make this the more probable, and himselfe of more credit, he aduertiseth that Reimond had placed and appointed garrisons for the purpose; and had sworne the whole armie to obserue certeine articles by him prescribed, to the great preiudice of the king. Which his aduertisment being interlined with manie good words, the king so credited the same, that he beleeued it to be most true: for as it is well seene, a little suspicion of an iniurie doone or offered to be doone vnto a prince, dooth more sticke in his mind, than manie benefits and good seruices before doone. The king therefore after the winter following, sent ouer foure of his seruants in message to Ireland; namelie Robert Powre, Osbert of Herloter or llerford, William Bendeger, and Adam of Gernemie: of which, two of them to come awaie and to bring Reimond with them, and the other to tarrie and remaine behind with the earle.

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