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Epimone.

Epimone in Latine Perseverantia, is a form of speech, by which the speaker continueth and persisteth in the same cause, much after one forme of speech.

There is a good example hereof in Abrahams praier or sute to God for the Sodomites, saying: “if there be fiftie righteous within the Citie wilt thou destroy, and not spare the place for the fiftie rigteous that are therein? That be far from thee, & c.” Gen.18. And thus he continueth perseverantly his suite and praier to the first request.

Another example of Christ, speaking to Peter: “Simon Joanna lovest thou me more then these? feede my sheepe” Joh.21.: which saying he repeateth three times, one shortly after another.

The use of this figure.

1. To signifie the greatnesse of the desire.
By this forme of spech the greatnesse of the desire is signified, either by often craving that which necesity requireth, or many time commaunding that, which reason directeth By this figure and maner of speaking the condemned man doth often pray
Luc.18.1.2.3.
& crie for mercie: the hungry repeateth his request many times, and necessitie will have no nay: whereby it commeth often times to passe, that albeit once or twise faile, yet many times may prevaile. And likewise in rules, commaundements, and warnings
2. To warne effectually.
twise may be remembred when once may be forgotten.

The Caution.

Albeit that the propertie of this figure, consisteth in the multitude of requests and often warnings, yet moderation
Importunat petitions are odious.
ought to restraine it from excesse and importunate requestes, which betokeneth either notable impudency, or shamelesse folly: a notorious vice in the greatest use among beggers, in whom it is used and brought forth by long custome.

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