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Actus Secunda.


[Scene I.]


Enter Pompey, Menecrates, and Menas, in

warlike manner.

Pom.
If the great Gods be iuſt, they ſhall aſſiſt
The deeds of iuſteſt men.

Mene.
Know worthy Pompey, that what they do de-
lay, they not deny.

Pom.
Whiles we are ſutors to their Throne, decayes
the thing we ſue for.

Mene.
We ignorant of our ſelues,
Begge often our owne harmes, which the wiſe Powres
Deny vs for our good: ſo finde we profit
By looſing of our Prayers.

Pom.
I ſhall do well:
The people loue me, and the Sea is mine;
My powers are Creſſent, and my Auguring hope
Sayes it will come to'th'full. Marke Anthony
In Egypt ſits at dinner, and will make
No warres without doores. Cæſar gets money where
He looſes hearts: Lepidus flatters both,
Of both is flatter'd: but he neither loues,
Nor either cares for him.

Mene.
Cæſar and Lepidus are in the field,
A mighty ſtrength they carry.

Pom.
Where haue you this? 'Tis falſe.

Mene.
From Siluius, Sir.

Pom.
He dreames: I know they are in Rome together
Looking for Anthony: but all the charmes of Loue,
Salt Cleopatra ſoften thy wand lip,
Let Witchcraft ioyne with Beauty, Luſt with both,
Tye vp the Libertine in a field of Feaſts,
Keepe his Braine fuming. Epicurean Cookes,
Sharpen with cloyleſſe ſawce his Appetite,
That ſleepe and feeding may prorogue his Honour,
Euen till a Lethied dulneſſe———
Enter Varrius.
How now Varrius?

Var.
This is moſt certaine, that I ſhall deliuer:
Marke Anthony is euery houre in Rome
Expected. Since he went from Egypt, 'tis
A ſpace for farther Trauaile.

Pom.
I could haue giuen leſſe matter
A better eare. Menas, I did not thinke
This amorous Surfetter would haue donn'd his Helme
For ſuch a petty Warre: His Souldierſhip
Is twice the other twaine: But let vs reare
The higher our Opinion, that our ſtirring
Can from the lap of Egypts Widdow, plucke
The neere Luſt-wearied Anthony.

Mene.
I cannot hope,
Cæſar and Anthony ſhall well greet to gether;
His Wife that's dead, did treſpaſſes to Cæſar,
His Brother wan'd vpon him, although I thinke
Not mou'd by Anthony.

Pom.
I know not Menas,
How leſſer Enmities may giue way to greater,
Were't not that we ſtand vp againſt them all:
'Twer pregnant they ſhould ſquare between themſelues,
For they haue entertained cauſe enough
To draw their ſwords: but how the feare of vs
May Ciment their diuiſions, and binde vp
The petty difference, we yet not know:
Bee't as our Gods will haue't; it onely ſtands
Our liues vpon, to vſe our ſtrongeſt hands
Come Menas. Exeunt.


[Scene II.]


Enter Enobarbus and Lepidus.

Lep.
Good Enobarbus, 'tis a worthy deed,
And ſhall become you well, to intreat your Captaine
To ſoft and gentle ſpeech.

Enob.
I ſhall intreat him
To anſwer like himſelfe: if Cæſar moue him,
Let Anthony looke ouer Cæſars head,
And ſpeake as lowd as Mars. By Iupiter,
Were I the wearer of Anthonio's Beard,
I would not ſhaue't to day.

Lep.
'Tis not a time for priuate ſtomacking.

Eno.
Euery time ſerues for the matter that is then
borne in't.

Lep.
But ſmall to greater matters muſt giue way.

Eno.
Not if the ſmall come firſt.

Lep.
Your ſpeech is paſſion: but pray you ſtirre
No Embers vp. Heere comes the Noble Anthony.
Enter Anthony and Ventidius.

Eno.
And yonder Cæſar.
Enter Cæſar, Mecenas, and Agrippa.

Ant.
If we compoſe well heere, to Parthia:
Hearke Ventidius.

Cæſar.
I do not know Mecenas, aske Agrippa.

Lep.
Noble Friends:
That which combin'd vs was moſt great, and let not
A leaner action rend vs. What's amiſſe,
May it be gently heard. When we debate
Our triuiall difference loud, we do commit
Murther in healing wounds. Then Noble Partners,
The rather for I earneſtly beſeech,
Touch you the ſowreſt points with ſweeteſt tearmes,
Nor curſtneſſe grow to'th'matter.

Ant.
'Tis ſpoken well:
Were we before our Armies, and to fight,
I ſhould do thus. Flouriſh.

Cæſ.
Welcome to Rome.

Ant.
Thanke you.

Cæſ.
Sit.
Ant, Sit ſir.

Cæſ.
Nay then.

Ant.
I learne, you take things ill, which are not ſo:
Or being, concerne you not.

Cæſ.
I muſt be laught at, if or for nothing, or a little, I
Should ſay my ſelfe offended, and with you
Chiefely i'th'world. More laught at, that I ſhould
Once name you derogately: when to ſound your name
It not concern'd me.

Ant.
My being in Egypt Cæſar, what was't to you?

Cæſ.
No more then my reciding heere at Rome
Might be to you in Egypt: yet if you there
Did practiſe on my State, your being in Egypt
Might be my queſtion.

Ant.
How intend you, practis'd?

Cæſ.
You may be pleas'd to catch at mine intent,
By what did heere befall me. Your Wife and Brother
Made warres vpon me, and their conteſtation
Was Theame for you, you were the word of warre.

Ant.
You do miſtake your buſines, my Brother neuer
Did vrge me in his Act: I did inquire it,
And haue my Learning from ſome true reports
That drew their ſwords with you, did he not rather
Diſcredit my authority with yours,
And make the warres alike againſt my ſtomacke,
Hauing alike your cauſe. Of this, my Letters
Before did ſatisfie you. If you'l patch a quarrell,
As matter whole you haue to make it with,
It muſt not be with this.

Cæſ.
You praiſe your ſelfe, by laying defects of iudge-
ment to me: but you patcht vp your excuſes.

Anth.
Not ſo, not ſo:
I know you could not lacke, I am certaine on't,
Very neceſſity of this thought, that I
Your Partner in the cauſe 'gainſt which he fought,
Could not with gracefull eyes attend thoſe Warres
Which fronted mine owne peace. As for my wife,
I would you had her ſpirit, in ſuch another,
The third oth'world is yours, which with a Snaffle,
You may pace eaſie, but not ſuch a wife.

Enobar.
Would we had all ſuch wiues, that the men
might go to Warres with the women.

Anth.
So much vncurbable, her Garboiles (Cæſar
Made out of her impatience: which not wanted
Shrodeneſſe of policie to: I greeuing grant,
Did you too much diſquiet, for that you muſt,
But ſay I could not helpe it.

Cæſar.
I wrote to you, when rioting in Alexandria you
Did pocket vp my Letters: and with taunts
Did gibe my Miſiue out of audience.

Ant.
Sir, he fell vpon me, ere admitted, then:
Three Kings I had newly feaſted, and did want
Of what I was i'th'morning: but next day
I told him of my ſelfe, which was as much
As to haue askt him pardon. Let this Fellow
Be nothing of our ſtrife: if we contend
Out of our queſtion wipe him.

Cæſar.
You haue broken the Article of your oath,
which you ſhall neuer haue tongue to charge me with.

Lep.
Soft Cæſar.

Ant.
No Lepidus, let him ſpeake,
The Honour is Sacred which he talks on now,
Suppoſing that I lackt it: but on Cæſar,
The Article of my oath.

Cæſar.
To lend me Armes, and aide when I requir'd
them, the which you both denied.

Anth.
Neglected rather:
And then when poyſoned houres had bound me vp
From mine owne knowledge, as neerely as I may,
Ile play the penitent to you. But mine honeſty,
Shall not make poore my greatneſſe, nor my power
Worke without it. Truth is, that Fuluia,
To haue me out of Egypt, made Warres heere,
For which my ſelfe, the ignorant motiue, do
So farre aske pardon, as befits mine Honour
To ſtoope in ſuch a caſe.

Lep.
'Tis Noble ſpoken.

Mece.
If it might pleaſe you, to enforce no further
The griefes betweene ye: to forget them quite,
Were to remember: that the preſent neede,
Speakes to attone you.

Lep.
Worthily ſpoken Mecenas.

Enobar.
Or if you borrow one anothers Loue for the
inſtant, you may when you heare no more words of
Pompey returne it againe: you ſhall haue time to wrangle
in, when you haue nothing elſe to do.

Anth.
Thou art a Souldier, onely ſpeake no more.

Enob.
That trueth ſhould be ſilent, I had almoſt for-
got.

Anth.
You wrong this preſence, therefore ſpeake no
more.

Enob.
Go too then: your Conſiderate ſtone.

Cæſar.
I do not much diſlike the matter, but
The manner of his ſpeech: for't cannot be,
We ſhall remaine in friendſhip, our conditions
So diffring in their acts. Yet if I knew,
What Hoope ſhould hold vs ſtaunch from edge to edge
Ath'world: I would perſue it.

Agri.
Giue me leaue Cæſar.

Cæſar.
Speake Agrippa.

Agri.
Thou haſt a Siſter by the Mothers ſide, admir'd
Octauia? Great Mark Anthony is now a widdower.

Cæſar.
Say not, ſay Agrippa; if Cleopater heard you, your
proofe were well deſerued of raſhneſſe.

Anth.
I am not marryed Cæſar: let me heere Agrippa
further ſpeake.

Agri.
To hold you in perpetuall ami tie,
To make you Brothers, and to knit your hearts
With an vn-ſlipping knot, take Anthony,
Octauia to his wife: whoſe beauty claimes
No worſe a husband then the beſt of men: whoſe
Vertue, and whoſe generall graces, ſpeake
That which none elſe can vtter. By this marriage,
All little Ielouſies which now ſeeme great,
And all great feares, which now import their dangers,
Would then be nothing. Truth's would be tales,
Where now halfe tales be truth's: her loue to both,
Would each to other, and all loues to both
Draw after her. Pardon what I haue fpoke
For 'tis a ſtudied not a preſent thought,
By duty ruminated.

Anth.
Will Cæſar ſpeake?

Cæſar.
Not till he heares how Anthony is toucht,
With what is ſpoke already.

Anth.
What power is in Agrippa,
If I would ſay Agrippa, be it ſo,
To make this good?

Cæſar.
The power of Cæſar,
And his power, vnto Octauia.

Anth.
May I neuer
(To this good purpoſe, that ſo fairely ſhewes)
Dreame of impediment: let me haue thy hand
Further this act of Grace: and from this houre,
The heart of Brothers gouerne in our Loues,
And ſway our great Deſignes.

Cæſar.
There's my hand:
A Siſter I bequeath you, whom no Brother
Did euer loue ſo deerely. Let her liue
To ioyne our kingdomes, and our hearts, and neuer
Flie off our Loues againe.

Lepi.
Happily, Amen.

Ant.
I did not think to draw my Sword 'gainſt Pompey,
For he hath laid ſtrange courteſies, and great
Of late vpon me. I muſt thanke him onely,
Leaſt my remembrance, ſuffer ill report:
At heele of that, defie him.

Lepi.
Time cals vpon's,
Of vs muſt Pompey preſently be ſought,
Or elſe he ſeekes out vs.

Anth.
Where lies he?

Cæſar.
About the Mount-Meſena.

Anth.
What is his ſtrength by land?

Cæſar.
Great, and encreaſing:
But by Sea he is an abſolute Maſter.

Anth.
So is the Fame,
Would we had ſpoke together. Haſt we for it,
Yet ere we put our ſelues in Armes, diſpatch we
The buſineſſe we haue talkt of.

Cæſar.
With moſt gladneſſe,
And do inuite you to my Siſters view,
Whether ſtraight Ile lead you.

Anth.
Let vs Lepidus not lacke your companie.

Lep.
Noble Anthony, not ſickeneſſe ſhould detaine
me.
Flouriſh. Exit omnes.
Manet Enobarbus, Agrippa, Mecenas.

Mec.
Welcome from Ægypt Sir.

Eno.
Halfe the heart of Cæſar, worthy Mecenas. My
honourable Friend Agrippa.

Agri.
Good Enobarbus.

Mece.
We haue cauſe to be glad, that matters are ſo
well diſgeſted: you ſtaid well by't in Egypt.

Enob.
I Sir, we did ſleepe day out of countenaunce:
and made the night light with drinking.

Mece.
Eight Wilde-Boares roſted whole at a break-
faſt: and but twelue perſons there. Is this true?

Eno.
This was but as a Flye by an Eagle: we had much
more monſtrous matter of Feaſt, which worthily deſer-
ued noting.

Mecen as.
She's a moſt triumphant Lady, if report be
ſquare to her.

Enob.
When ſhe firſt met Marke Anthony, ſhe purſt
vp his heart vpon the Riuer of Sidnis.

Agri.
There ſhe appear'd indeed: or my reporter de-
uis'd well for her.

Eno.
I will tell you,
The Barge ſhe ſat in, like a burniſht Throne
Burnt on the water: the Poope was beaten Gold,
Purple the Sailes: and ſo perfumed that
The Windes were Loue-ſicke.
With them the Owers were Siluer,
Which to the tune of Flutes kept ſtroke, and made
The water which they beate, to follow faſter;
As amorous of their ſtrokes. For her owne perſon,
It beggerd all diſcription, ſhe did lye
In her Pauillion, cloth of Gold, of Tiſſue,
O're-picturing that Venns, where we ſee
The fancie out-worke Nature. On each ſide her,
Stood pretty Dimpled Boyes, like ſmiling Cupids,
With diuers coulour'd Fannes whoſe winde did ſeeme,
To gloue the delicate cheekes which they did coole,
And what they vndid did.

Agrip.
Oh rare for Anthony.

Eno.
Her Gentlewoman, like the Nereides,
So many Mer-maides tended her i'th'eyes,
And made their bends adornings. At the Helme.
A ſeeming Mer-maide ſteeres: The Silken Tackle,
Swell with the touches of thoſe Flower-ſoft hands,
That yarely frame the office. From the Barge
A ſtrange inuiſible perfume hits the ſenſe
Of the adiacent Wharfes. The Citty caſt
Her people out vpon her: and Anthony
Enthron'd i'th'Market-place, did ſit alone,
Whiſling to'th'ayre: which but for vacancie,
Had gone to gaze on Cleopater too,
And made a gap in Nature.

Agri.
Rare Egiptian.

Eno.
Vpon her landing, Anthony ſent to her,
Inuited her to Supper: ſhe replyed,
It ſhould be better, he became her gueſt:
Which ſhe entreated, our Courteous Anthony,
Whom nere the word of no woman hard ſpeake,
Being barber'd ten times o're, goes to the Feaſt;
And for his ordinary, paies his heart,
For what his eyes eate onely.

Agri.
Royall Wench:
She made great Cæſar lay his Sword to bed,
He ploughed her, and ſhe cropt.

Eno.
I ſaw her once
Hop forty Paces through the publicke ſtre ete,
And hauing loſt her breath, ſhe ſpoke, and panted,
That ſhe did make defect, perfection,
And breathleſſe powre breath forth.

Mece.
Now Anthony, muſt leaue her vtterly.

Eno.
Neuer he will not:
Age cannot wither her, nor cuſtome ſtale
Her infinite variety: other women cloy
The appetites they feede, but ſhe makes hungry,
Where moſt ſhe ſatisfies. For vildeſt things
Become themſelues in her, that the holy Prieſts
Bleſſe her, when ſhe is Riggiſh.
Mece If Beauty, Wiſedome, Modeſty, can ſett le
The heart of Anthony: Octauia is
A bleſſed Lottery to him.

Agrip.
Let vs go. Good Enobarbus, make your ſelfe
my gueſt, whilſt you abide heere.

Eno.
Humbly Sir I thanke you. Exeunt


[Scene III.]


Enter Anthony, Cæſar, Octauia betweene them.

Anth.
The world, and my great office, will
Sometimes deuide me from your boſome.

Octa.
All which time, before the Gods my knee ſhall
bowe my ptayers to them for you.

Anth.
Goodnight Sir. My Octauia
Read not my blemiſhes in the worlds report:
I haue not kept my ſquare, but that to come
Shall all be done byth'Rule: good night deere Lady:
Good night Sir.

Cæſar.
Goodnight. Exit.
Enter Soothſaier.

Anth.
Now ſirrah: you do wiſh your ſelfe in Egypt?

Sooth.
Would I had neuer come from thence, nor you
thither.

Ant.
If you can, your reaſon?

Sooth.
I ſee it in my motion: haue it not in my tongue,
But yet hie you to Egypt againe.

Antho.
Say to me, whoſe Fortunes ſhall riſe higher
Cæſars or mine?

Soot.
Cæſars. Therefore (oh Anthony) ſtay not by his ſide
Thy Dæmon that thy ſpirit which keepes thee, is
Noble, Couragious, high vnmatchable,
Where Cæſars is not. But neere him, thy Angell
Becomes a feare: as being o're-powr'd, therefore
Make ſpace enough betweene you.

Anth.
Speake this no more.

Sooth.
To none but thee no more but: when to thee,
If thou doſt play with him at any game,
Thou art ſure to looſe: And of that Naturall lucke,
He beats thee 'gainſt the oddes. Thy Luſter thickens,
When he ſhines by: I ſay againe, thy ſpirit
Is all affraid to gouerne thee neere him:
But he alway 'tis Noble.

Anth.
Get thee gone:
Say to Ventigius I would ſpeake with him. Exit.
He ſhall to Parthia, be it Art or hap,
He hath ſpoken true. The very Dice obey him,
And in our ſports my better cunning faints,
Vnder his chance, if we draw lots he ſpeeds,
His Cocks do winne the Battaile, ſtill of mine,
When it is all to naught: and his Quailes euer
Beate mine(in hoopt) at odd's. I will to Egypte:
And though I make this marriage for my peace,
I'th'Eaſt my pleaſure lies. Oh come Ventigius.
Enter Ventigius.
You muſt to Parthia, your Commiſſions ready:
Follow me, and reciue't. Exeunt


[Scene IV.]


Enter Lepidus, Mecenas and Agrippa.

Lepidus.
Trouble your ſelues no further: pray you
haſten your Generals after.

Agr.
Sir, Marke Anthony, will e'ne but kiſſe Octauia,
and weele follow.

Lepi.
Till I ſhall ſee you in your Souldiers dreſſe,
Which will become you both: Farewell.

Mece.
We ſhall: as I conceiue the iourney, be at
Mount before you Lepidus.

Lepi.
Your way is ſhorter, my purpoſes do draw me
much about, you'le win two dayes vpon me.

Both.
Sir good ſucceſſe.

Lepi.
Farewell. Exeunt.


[Scene V.]


Enter Cleopater, Charmian, Iras, and Alexas.

Cleo.
Giue me ſome Muſicke: Muſicke, moody foode
of vs that trade in Loue.

Omnes.
The Muſicke, hoa.
Enter Mardian the Eunuch.

Cleo.
Let it alone, let's to Billards: come Charmian.

Char.
My arme is ſore, beſt play with Mardian.

Cleopa.
As well a woman with an Eunuch plaide, as
with a woman. Come you'le play with me Sir?

Mardi.
As well as I can Madam.

Cleo.
And when good will is ſhewed,
Though't come to ſhort
The Actor may pleade pardon. Ile none now,
Giue me mine Angle, weele to'th'Riuer there
My Muſicke playing farre off. I will betray
Tawny fine fiſhes, my bended hooke ſhall pierce
Their ſlimy iawes: and as I draw them vp,
Ile thinke them euery one an Anthony,
And ſay, ah ha;y'are caught.

Char.
'Twas merry when you wager'd on your Ang-
ling, when your diuer did hang a ſalt fiſh on his hooke
which he with feruencie drew vp.

Cleo.
That time? Oh times:
I laught him out of patience: and that night
I laught him into patience, and next morne,
Ere the ninth houre, I drunke him to his bed:
Then put my Tires and Mantles on him, whilſt
I wore his Sword Phillippan. Oh from Italie,
Enter a Meſſenger.
Ramme thou thy fruitefull tidings in mine eares,
That long time haue bin barren.

Meſ.
Madam, Madam.

Cleo.
Anthonyo's dead,
If thou ſay ſo Villaine, thou kil'ſt thy Miſtris:
But well and free, if thou ſo yeild him.
There is Gold, and heere
My bleweſt vaines to kiſſe: a hand that Kings
Haue lipt, and trembled kiſſing.

Meſ.
Firſt Madam, he is well.

Cleo.
Why there's more Gold.
But ſirrah marke, we vſe
To ſay, the dead are well: bring it to that,
The Gold I giue thee, will I melt and powr
Downe thy ill vttering throate.

Meſ.
Good Madam heare me.

Cleo.
Well, go too I will:
But there's no goodneſſe in thy face if Anthony
Be free and healthfull;ſo tart a fauour
To trumpet ſuch good tidings. If not well,
Thou ſhouldſt come like a Furie crown'd with Snakes,
Not like a formall man.

Meſ.
Wilt pleaſe you heare me?

Cleo.
I haue a mind to ſtrike thee ere thou ſpeak'ſt:
Yet if thou ſay Anthony liues, 'tis well,
Or friends with Cæſar, or not Captiue to him,
Ile ſet thee in a ſhower of Gold, and haile
Rich Pearles vpon thee.

Meſ.
Madam, he's well.

Cleo.
Well ſaid.

Meſ.
And Friends with Cæſar.

Cleo.
Th'art an honeſt man.

Meſ.
Cæſar, and he, are greater Friends then euer.

Cleo.
Make thee a Fortune from me.

Meſ.
But yet Madam.

Cleo.
I do not like but yet, it does alay
The good precedence, fie vpon but yet,
Bur yet is as a Iaylor to bring foorth
Some monſtrous Malefactor. Prythee Friend,
Powre out the packe of matter to mine eare,
The good and bad together: he's friends with Cæſar,
In ſtate of heal th thou ſaiſt, and thou ſaiſt, free.

Meſ.
Free Madam, no: I made no ſuch report,
He's bound vnto Octauia.

Cleo.
For what good turne?

Meſ.
For the beſt turne i'th'bed.

Cleo.
I am pale Charmian.

Meſ.
Madam, he's married to Octauia.

Cleo.
The moſt infectious Peſtilence vpon thee.
Strikes him downe.

Meſ.
Good Madam patience.

Cleo.
What ſay you? Strikes him.
Hence horrible Villaine, or Ile ſpurne thine eyes
Like balls before me: Ile vnhaire thy head,
She hales him vp and downe.
Thou ſhalt be whipt with Wyer, and ſtew'd in brine,
Smarting in lingring pickle.

Meſ.
Gratious Madam,
I that do bring the newes, made not the match.

Cleo.
Say 'tis not ſo, a Prouince I will giue thee,
And make thy Fortunes proud: the blow thou had'ſt
Shall make thy peace, for mouing me to rage,
And I will boot thee with what guift beſide
Thy modeſtie can begge.

Meſ.
He's married Madam.

Cleo.
Rogue, thou haſt liu'd too long. Draw a knife.

Meſ.
Nay then Ile runne:
What meane you Madam, I haue made no fault. Exit.

Char.
Good Madam keepe your ſelfe within your ſelfe,
The man is innocent.

Cleo.
Some Innocents ſcape not the thunderbolt:
Melt Egypt into Nyle: and kindly creatures
Turne all to Serpents. Call the ſlaue againe,
Though I am mad, I will not byte him: Call?

Char.
He is afeard to come.

Cleo.
I will not hurt him,
Theſe hands do lacke Nobility, that they ſtrike
A meaner then my ſelfe: ſince I my ſelfe
Haue giuen my ſelfe the cauſe. Come hither Sir.
Enter the Meſſenger againe.
Though it be honeſt, it is neuer good
To bring bad newes: giue to a gratious Meſſage
An hoſt of tongues, but let ill tydings tell
Themſelues, when they be felt.

Meſ.
I haue done my duty.

Cleo.
Is he married?
I cannot hate thee worſer then I do,
If thou againe ſay yes.

Meſ.
He's married Madam.

Cleo.
The Gods confound thee,
Doſt thou hold there ſtill?

Meſ.
Should I lye Madame?

Cleo.
Oh, I would thou didſt:
So halfe my Egypt were ſubmerg'd and made
A Ceſterne for ſcal'd Snakes. Go get thee hence,
Had'ſt thou Narciſſus in thy face to me,
Thou would'ſt appeere moſt vgly: He is married?

Meſ.
I craue your Highneſſe pardon.

Cleo.
He is married?

Meſ.
Take no offence, that I would not offend you,
To punniſh me for what you make me do
Seemes much vnequall, he's married to Octauia.

Cleo.
Oh that his fault ſhould make a knaue of thee,
That art not what th'art ſure of. Get thee hence,
The Marchandize which thou haſt brought from Rome
Are all too deere for me:
Lye they vpon thy hand, and be vndone by em.

Char.
Good your Highneſſe patience.

Cleo.
In prayſing Anthony, I haue diſprais'd Cæſar.

Char.
Many times Madam.

Cleo.
I am paid for't now: lead me from hence,
I faint, oh Iras, Charmian: 'tis no matter.
Go to the Fellow, good Alexas bid him
Report the feature of Octauia: her yeares,
Her inclination, let him not leaue out
The colour of her haire. Bring me word quickly,
Let him for euer go, let him not Charmian,
Though he be painted one way like a Gorgon,
The other wayes a Mars. Bid you Alexas
Bring me word, how tall ſhe is: pitty me Charmian,
But do not ſpeake to me. Lead me to my Chamber.
Exeunt.


[Scene VI.]


Flouriſh. Enter Pompey, at one doore with Drum and Trum-

pet: at another Cæſar, Lepidus, Anthony, Enobarbus, Me-

cenas, Agrippa, Menas with Souldiers Marching.

Pom.
Your Hoſtages I haue, ſo haue you mine:
And we ſhall talke before we fight.

Cæſar.
Moſt meete that firſt we come to words,
And therefore haue we
Our written purpoſes before vs ſent,
Which if thou haſt conſidered, let vs know,
If'twill tye vp thy diſcontented Sword,
And carry backe to Cicelie much tall youth,
That elſe muſt periſh heere.

Pom.
To you all three,
The Senators alone of this great world,
Chiefe Factors for the Gods. I do not know,
Wherefore my Father ſhould reuengers want,
Hauing a Sonne and Friends, ſince Iulius Cæſar,
Who at Phillippi the good Brutus ghoſted,
There ſaw you labouring for him. What was't
That mou'd pale Caſſius to conſpire? And what
Made all-honor'd, honeſt, Romaine Brutus,
With the arm'd reſt, Courtiers of beautious freedome,
To drench the Capitoll, but that they would
Haue one man but a man, and that his it
Hath made me rigge my Nauie. At whoſe burthen,
The anger'd Ocean fomes, with which I meant
To ſcourge th'ingratitude, that deſpightfull Rome
Caſt on my Noble Father.

Cæſar.
Take your time.

Ant.
Thou can'ſt not feare vs Pompey with thy ſailes.
Weele ſpeake with thee at Sea. At land thou know'ſt
How much we do o're-count thee.

Pom.
At Land indeed
Thou doſt ore count me of my Fatherrs houſe:
But ſince the Cuckoo buildes not for himſelſe,
Remaine in't as thou maiſt.

Lepi.
Be pleas'd to tell vs,
(For this is from the preſent how you take)
The offers we haue ſent you.

Cæſar.
There's the point.

Ant.
Which do not be entreated too,
But waigh what it is worth imbrac'd

Cæſar.
And what may follow to try a larger Fortune.

Pom.
You haue made me offer
Of Cicelie, Sardinia: and I muſt
Rid all the Sea of Pirats. Then, to ſend
Meaſures of Wheate to Rome: this greed vpon,
To part with vnhackt edges, and beare backe
Our Targes vndinted.

Omnes.
That's our offer.

Pom.
Know then I came before you heere,
A man prepar'd
To take this offer. But Marke Anthony,
Put me to ſome impatience: though I looſe
The praiſe of it by telling. You muſt know
When Cæſar and your Brother were at blowes,
Your Mother came to Cicelie, and did finde
Her welcome Friendly.

Ant.
I haue heard it Pompey,
And am well ſtudied for a liberall thanks,
Which I do owe you.

Pom.
Let me haue your hand:
I did not thinke Sir, to haue met you heere,

Ant.
The beds i'th'Eaſt are ſoft, and thanks to you,
That cal'd me timelier then my purpoſe hither:
For I haue gained by't.

Cæſar.
Since I ſaw you laſt, ther's a change vpon you.

Pom.
Well, I know not,
What counts harſh Fotune caſt's vpon my face,
But in my boſome ſhall ſhe neuer come,
To make my heart her vaſſaile.

Lep.
Well met heere.

Pom.
I hope ſo Lepidus, thus we are agreed:
I craue our compoſion may be written
And ſeal'd betweene vs,

Cæſar.
That's the next to do.

Pom.
Weele feaſt each other, ere we part, and lett's
Draw lots who ſhall begin.

Ant.
That will I Pompey.

Pompey.
No Anthony take the lot: but firſt or laſt,
your fine Egyptian cookerie ſhall haue the fame, I haue
heard that Iulius Cæſar, grew fat with feaſting there.

Anth.
You haue heard much.

Pom.
I haue faire meaning Sir.

Ant.
And faire words to them.

Pom.
Then ſo much haue I heard,
And I haue heard Appolodorus carried———

Eno.
No more that: he did ſo.

Pom.
What I pray you?

Eno.
A certaine Queene to Cæſar in a Matris.

Pom.
I know thee now, how far'ſt thou Souldier?

Eno.
Well, and well am like to do, for I perceiue
Foure Feaſts are toward.

Pom.
Let me ſhake thy hand,
I neuer hated thee: I haue ſeene thee fight,
When I haue enuied thy behauiour.

Enob.
Sir, I neuer lou'd you much, but I ha'prais'd ye,
When you haue well deſeru'd ten times as much,
As I haue ſaid you did.

Pom.
Inioy thy plainneſſe,
It nothing ill becomes thee:
Aboord my Gally, I inuite you all.
Will you leade Lords?

All.
Shew's the way, ſir.

Pom.
Come. Exeunt. Manet Enob .& Menas

Men.
Thy Father Pompey would ne're haue made this
Treaty. You, and I haue knowne ſir.

Enob.
At Sea, I thinke.

Men.
We haue Sir.

Enob.
You haue done well by water.

Men.
And you by Land.

Enob.
I will praiſe any man that will praiſe me, thogh
it cannot be denied what I haue done by Land.

Men.
Nor what I haue done by water.

Enob.
Yes ſome-thing you can deny for your owne
ſafety: you haue bin a great Theefe by Sea.

Men.
And you by Land.

Enob.
There I deny my Land ſeruice: but giue mee
your hand Menas, if our eyes had authority, heere they
might take two Theeues kiſſing.

Men.
All mens faces are true, whatſomere their hands
are.

Enob.
But there is neuer a fayre Woman, ha's a true
Face.

Men.
No ſlander, they ſteale hearts.

Enob.
We came hither to fight with you.

Men.
For my part, I am ſorry it is turn'd to a Drink-
ing. Pompey doth this day laugh away his Fortune.

Enob.
If he do, ſure he cannot weep't backe againe.

Men.
Y'haue ſaid Sir, we look'd not for Marke An-
thony heere, pray you, is he married to Cleopatra?

Enob.
Cæſars Siſter is call'd Octauia.

Men.
True Sir, ſhe was the wife of Caius Marcellus.

Enob.
But ſhe is now the wife of Marcus Anthonius.

Men.
Pray'ye ſir.

Enob.
'Tis true.

Men.
Then is Cæſar and he, for euer knit together.

Enob.
If I were bound to Diuine of this vnity, I wold
not Propheſie ſo.

Men.
I thinke the policy of that purpoſe, made more
in the Marriage, then the loue of the parties.

Enob.
I thinke ſo too. But you ſhall finde the band
that ſeemes to tye their friendſhip together, will bee the
very ſtrangler of their Amity: Octauia is of a holy, cold,
and ſtill conuerſation.

Men.
Who would not haue his wife ſo?

Eno.
Not he that himſelfe is not ſo: which is Marke
Anthony: he will to his Egyptian diſh againe: then ſhall
the ſighes of Octauia blow the fire vp in Cæſar, and (as I
ſaid before) that which is the ſtrength oſ their Amity,
ſhall proue the immediate Author of their variance. An-
thony will vſe his affection where it is. Hee married but
his occaſion heere.

Men.
And thus it may be. Come Sir, will you aboord?
I haue a health for you.

Enob.
I ſhall take it ſir: we haue vs'd our Throats in
Egypt.

Men.
Come, let's away. Exeunt.


[Scene VII.]


Muſicke playes.

Enter two or three Seruants with a Banket.

1
Heere they'l be man: ſome o'th'their Plants are ill
rooted already, the leaſt winde i'th'world wil blow them
downe.

2
Lepidus is high Conlord.

1
They haue made him drinke Almes drinke.

2
As they pinch one another by the diſpoſition, hee
cries out, no more; reconciles them to his entreatie, and
himſelfe to'th'drinke.

1
But it raiſes the greatet warre betweene him & his
diſcretion.

2
Why this it is to haue a name in great mens Fel-
lowſhip: I had as liue haue a Reede that will doe me no
ſeruice, as a Partizan I could not heaue.

1
To be call'd into a huge Sphere, and not to be ſeene
to moue in't, are the holes where eyes ſhould bee, which
pittifully diſaſter the cheekes.
A Sennet ſounded.
Enter Cæſar, Anthony, Pompey, Lepidus, Agrippa, Mecenas,
Enobarbus, Menes, with other Captaines.

Ant.
Thus do they Sir: they take the flow o'th'Nyle
By certaine ſcales i'th'Pyramid: they know
By'th'height, the lowneſſe, or the meane: If dearth
Or Foizon follow. The higher Nilus ſwels,
The more it promiſes: as it ebbes, the Seedſman
Vpon the ſlime and Ooze ſcatters his graine,
And ſhortly comes to Harueſt.

Lep.
Y'haue ſtrange Serpents there?

Anth.
I Lepidus.

Lep.
Your Serpent of Egypt, is bred now of your mud
by the operation of your Sun: ſo is your Crocodile.

Ant.
They are ſo.

Pom.
Sit, and ſome Wine: A health to Lepidus.

Lep.
I am not ſo well as I ſhould be:
But Ile ne're out.

Enob.
Not till you haue ſlept: I feare me you'l bee in
till then.

Lep.
Nay certainly, I haue heard the Ptolomies Pyra-
miſis are very goodly things: without contradiction I
haue heard that.

Menas.
Pompey, a word.

Pomp.
Say in mine eare, what is't.

Men.
Forſake thy ſeate I do beſeech thee Captaine,
And heare me ſpeake a word.

Pom.
Forbeare me till anon. Whiſpers in's Eare.
This Wine for Lepidus.

Lep.
Whar manner o'thing is your Crocodile?

Ant.
It is ſhap'd ſir like it ſelfe, and it is as broad as it
hath bredth; It is iuſt ſo high as it is, and mooues with it
owne organs. It liues by that which nouriſheth it, and
the Elements once out of it, it Tranſmigrates.

Lep.
What colour is it of?

Ant.
Of it owne colour too.

Lep.
'Tis a ſtrange Serpent.

Ant.
'Tis ſo, and the teares of it are wet.

Cæſ.
Will this deſcription ſatisfie him?

Ant.
With the Health that Pompey giues him, elſe he
is a very Epicure.

Pomp.
Go hang ſir, hang: tell me of that? Away:
Do as I bid you. Where's this Cup I call'd for?

Men.
If for the ſake of Merit thou wilt heare mee,
Riſe from thy ſtoole.

Pom.
I thinke th'art mad: the matter?

Men.
I haue euer held my cap off to thy Fortunes.

Pom.
Thou haſt ſeru'd me with much faith: what's
elſe to ſay? Be iolly Lords.

Anth.
Theſe Quicke-ſands Lepidus,
Keepe off, them for you ſinke.

Men.
Wilt thou be Lord of all the world?

Pom.
What ſaiſt thou?

Men.
Wilt thou be Lord of the whole world?
That's twice.

Pom.
How ſhould that be?

Men.
But entertaine it, and though thou thinke me
poore, I am the man will giue thee all the world.

Pom.
Haſt thou drunke well.

Men.
No Pompey, I haue kept me from the cup,
Thou art if thou dar'ſt be, the earthly Ioue:
What ere the Ocean pales, or skie inclippes,
Is thine, if thou wilt ha't.

Pom.
Shew me which way?

Men.
Theſe three World-ſharers, theſe Competitors
Are in thy veſſell. Let me cut the Cable,
And when we are put off, fall to their throates:
All there is thine.

Pom.
Ah, this thou ſhouldſt haue done,
And not haue ſpoke on't. In me 'tis villanie,
In thee,'t had bin good ſeruice: thou muſt know,
'Tis not my profit that does lead mine Honour:
Mine Honour it, Repent that ere thy tongue,
Hath ſo betraide thine acte. Being done vnknowne,
I ſhould haue found it afterwards well done,
But muſt condemne it now: deſiſt, and drinke.

Men.
For this, Ile neuer follow
Thy paul'd Fortunes more,
Who ſeekes and will not take, when once 'tis offer'd,
Shall neuer finde it more.

Pom.
This health to Lepidus.

Ant.
Beare him aſhore,
Ile pledge it for him Pompey.

Eno.
Heere's to thee Menas.

Men.
Enobarbus, welcome.

Pom.
Fill till the cup be hid.

Eno.
There's a ſtrong Fellow Menas.

Men.
Why?

Eno.
A beares the third part of the world man: ſeeſt
not?

Men.
The third part, then he is drunk: would it were
all, that it might go on wheeles.

Eno.
Drinke thou: encreaſe the Reeles.
Men Come.

Pom.
This is not yet an Alexandrian Feaſt.

Ant.
It ripen's towards it: ſtrike the Veſſells hoa.
Heere's to Cæſar.

Cæſar.
I could well forbear't, it's monſtrous labour
when I waſh my braine, and it grow fouler.

Ant.
Be a Child o'th'time.

Cæſar.
Poſſeſſe it, Ile make anſwer: but I had rather
faſt from all, foure dayes, then drinke ſo much in one.

Enob.
Ha my braue Emperour, ſhall we daunce now
the Egyptian Backenals, and celebrate our drinke?

Pom.
Let's ha't good Souldier.

Ant.
Come, let's all take hands,
Till that the conquering Wine hath ſteep't our ſenſe,
In ſoft and delicate Lethe.

Eno.
All take hands:
Make battery to our eares with the loud Muſicke,
The while, Ile place you, then the Boy ſhall ſing.
The holding euery man ſhall beate as loud,
As his ſtrong ſides can volly.
Muſicke Playes. Enobarbus places them hand in hand.

The Song.

Come thou Monarch of the Vinc,
Plumpie Bacchus, with pinke eyne:
In thy Fattes our Cares be drown'd,
With thy Grapes our haires be Crown'd.
Cup vs till the world go round,
Cup vs till the world go round.

Cæſar.
What would you more?
Pompey goodnight. Good Brother
Let me requeſt you of our grauer buſineſſe
Frownes at this leuitie. Gentle Lords let's part,
You ſee we haue burnt our cheekes. Strong Enobarbe
Is weaker then the Wine, and mine owne tongue
Spleet's what it ſpeakes: the wilde diſguiſe hath almoſt
Antickt vs all. What needs more words? goodnight.
Good Anthony your hand.

Pom.
Ile try you on the ſhore.

Anth.
And ſhall Sir, giues your hand.

Pom.
Oh Anthony, you haue my Father houſe.
But what, we are Friends?
Come downe into the Boate.

Eno.
Take heed you fall not Menas: Ile not on ſhore,
No to my Cabin: theſe Drummes,
Theſe Trumpets, Flutes: what
Let Neptune heare, we bid aloud farewell
To theſe great Fellowes. Sound and be hang'd, ſound out.
Sound a Flouriſh with Drummes.

Enor.
Hoo ſaies a there's my Cap.

Men.
Hoa, Noble Captaine, come. Exeunt.

load focus Notes (Horace Howard Furness, 1907)
load focus Notes (Horace Howard Furness, 1907)
load focus English (W. G. Clark, W. Aldis Wright)
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