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[Scene V.]


Enter Cleopater, Charmian, Iras, and Alexas.

Cleo.
Giue me ſome Muſicke: Muſicke, moody foode
of vs that trade in Loue.

Omnes.
The Muſicke, hoa.
Enter Mardian the Eunuch.

Cleo.
Let it alone, let's to Billards: come Charmian.

Char.
My arme is ſore, beſt play with Mardian.

Cleopa.
As well a woman with an Eunuch plaide, as
with a woman. Come you'le play with me Sir?

Mardi.
As well as I can Madam.

Cleo.
And when good will is ſhewed,
Though't come to ſhort
The Actor may pleade pardon. Ile none now,
Giue me mine Angle, weele to'th'Riuer there
My Muſicke playing farre off. I will betray
Tawny fine fiſhes, my bended hooke ſhall pierce
Their ſlimy iawes: and as I draw them vp,
Ile thinke them euery one an Anthony,
And ſay, ah ha;y'are caught.

Char.
'Twas merry when you wager'd on your Ang-
ling, when your diuer did hang a ſalt fiſh on his hooke
which he with feruencie drew vp.

Cleo.
That time? Oh times:
I laught him out of patience: and that night
I laught him into patience, and next morne,
Ere the ninth houre, I drunke him to his bed:
Then put my Tires and Mantles on him, whilſt
I wore his Sword Phillippan. Oh from Italie,
Enter a Meſſenger.
Ramme thou thy fruitefull tidings in mine eares,
That long time haue bin barren.

Meſ.
Madam, Madam.

Cleo.
Anthonyo's dead,
If thou ſay ſo Villaine, thou kil'ſt thy Miſtris:
But well and free, if thou ſo yeild him.
There is Gold, and heere
My bleweſt vaines to kiſſe: a hand that Kings
Haue lipt, and trembled kiſſing.

Meſ.
Firſt Madam, he is well.

Cleo.
Why there's more Gold.
But ſirrah marke, we vſe
To ſay, the dead are well: bring it to that,
The Gold I giue thee, will I melt and powr
Downe thy ill vttering throate.

Meſ.
Good Madam heare me.

Cleo.
Well, go too I will:
But there's no goodneſſe in thy face if Anthony
Be free and healthfull;ſo tart a fauour
To trumpet ſuch good tidings. If not well,
Thou ſhouldſt come like a Furie crown'd with Snakes,
Not like a formall man.

Meſ.
Wilt pleaſe you heare me?

Cleo.
I haue a mind to ſtrike thee ere thou ſpeak'ſt:
Yet if thou ſay Anthony liues, 'tis well,
Or friends with Cæſar, or not Captiue to him,
Ile ſet thee in a ſhower of Gold, and haile
Rich Pearles vpon thee.

Meſ.
Madam, he's well.

Cleo.
Well ſaid.

Meſ.
And Friends with Cæſar.

Cleo.
Th'art an honeſt man.

Meſ.
Cæſar, and he, are greater Friends then euer.

Cleo.
Make thee a Fortune from me.

Meſ.
But yet Madam.

Cleo.
I do not like but yet, it does alay
The good precedence, fie vpon but yet,
Bur yet is as a Iaylor to bring foorth
Some monſtrous Malefactor. Prythee Friend,
Powre out the packe of matter to mine eare,
The good and bad together: he's friends with Cæſar,
In ſtate of heal th thou ſaiſt, and thou ſaiſt, free.

Meſ.
Free Madam, no: I made no ſuch report,
He's bound vnto Octauia.

Cleo.
For what good turne?

Meſ.
For the beſt turne i'th'bed.

Cleo.
I am pale Charmian.

Meſ.
Madam, he's married to Octauia.

Cleo.
The moſt infectious Peſtilence vpon thee.
Strikes him downe.

Meſ.
Good Madam patience.

Cleo.
What ſay you? Strikes him.
Hence horrible Villaine, or Ile ſpurne thine eyes
Like balls before me: Ile vnhaire thy head,
She hales him vp and downe.
Thou ſhalt be whipt with Wyer, and ſtew'd in brine,
Smarting in lingring pickle.

Meſ.
Gratious Madam,
I that do bring the newes, made not the match.

Cleo.
Say 'tis not ſo, a Prouince I will giue thee,
And make thy Fortunes proud: the blow thou had'ſt
Shall make thy peace, for mouing me to rage,
And I will boot thee with what guift beſide
Thy modeſtie can begge.

Meſ.
He's married Madam.

Cleo.
Rogue, thou haſt liu'd too long. Draw a knife.

Meſ.
Nay then Ile runne:
What meane you Madam, I haue made no fault. Exit.

Char.
Good Madam keepe your ſelfe within your ſelfe,
The man is innocent.

Cleo.
Some Innocents ſcape not the thunderbolt:
Melt Egypt into Nyle: and kindly creatures
Turne all to Serpents. Call the ſlaue againe,
Though I am mad, I will not byte him: Call?

Char.
He is afeard to come.

Cleo.
I will not hurt him,
Theſe hands do lacke Nobility, that they ſtrike
A meaner then my ſelfe: ſince I my ſelfe
Haue giuen my ſelfe the cauſe. Come hither Sir.
Enter the Meſſenger againe.
Though it be honeſt, it is neuer good
To bring bad newes: giue to a gratious Meſſage
An hoſt of tongues, but let ill tydings tell
Themſelues, when they be felt.

Meſ.
I haue done my duty.

Cleo.
Is he married?
I cannot hate thee worſer then I do,
If thou againe ſay yes.

Meſ.
He's married Madam.

Cleo.
The Gods confound thee,
Doſt thou hold there ſtill?

Meſ.
Should I lye Madame?

Cleo.
Oh, I would thou didſt:
So halfe my Egypt were ſubmerg'd and made
A Ceſterne for ſcal'd Snakes. Go get thee hence,
Had'ſt thou Narciſſus in thy face to me,
Thou would'ſt appeere moſt vgly: He is married?

Meſ.
I craue your Highneſſe pardon.

Cleo.
He is married?

Meſ.
Take no offence, that I would not offend you,
To punniſh me for what you make me do
Seemes much vnequall, he's married to Octauia.

Cleo.
Oh that his fault ſhould make a knaue of thee,
That art not what th'art ſure of. Get thee hence,
The Marchandize which thou haſt brought from Rome
Are all too deere for me:
Lye they vpon thy hand, and be vndone by em.

Char.
Good your Highneſſe patience.

Cleo.
In prayſing Anthony, I haue diſprais'd Cæſar.

Char.
Many times Madam.

Cleo.
I am paid for't now: lead me from hence,
I faint, oh Iras, Charmian: 'tis no matter.
Go to the Fellow, good Alexas bid him
Report the feature of Octauia: her yeares,
Her inclination, let him not leaue out
The colour of her haire. Bring me word quickly,
Let him for euer go, let him not Charmian,
Though he be painted one way like a Gorgon,
The other wayes a Mars. Bid you Alexas
Bring me word, how tall ſhe is: pitty me Charmian,
But do not ſpeake to me. Lead me to my Chamber.
Exeunt.

load focus Notes (Horace Howard Furness, 1907)
load focus Notes (Horace Howard Furness, 1907)
load focus English (W. G. Clark, W. Aldis Wright)
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