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[Scene III.]


Enter Cleopatra, Charmian, Iras, and Alexas.

Cleo.
Where is the Fellow?

Alex.
Halfe afeard to come.

Cleo.
Go too, go too: Come hither Sir.
Enter the Meſſenger as before.

Alex.
Good Maieſtie: Herod of Iury dare not looke
vpon you, but when you are well pleas'd.

Cleo.
That Herods head, Ile haue: but how? When
Anthony is gone, through whom I might commaund it:
Come thou neere.

Meſ.
Moſt gratious Maieſtie.

Cleo.
Did'ſt thou behold Octauia?

Meſ.
I dread Queene.

Cleo.
Where?

Meſ.
Madam in Rome, I lookt her in the face: and
ſaw her led betweene her Brother, and Marke Anthony.

Cleo.
Is ſhe as tall as me?

Meſ.
She is not Madam.

Cleo.
Didſt heare her ſpeake?
Is ſhe ſhrill tongu'd or low?

Meſ.
Madam, I heard her ſpeake, ſhe is low voic'd.

Cleo.
That's not ſo good: he cannot like her long.

Char.
Like her? Oh Iſis: 'tis impoſſible.

Cleo.
I thinke ſo Charmian: dull of tongue, & dwarfiſh
What Maieſtie is in her gate, remember
If ere thou look'ſt on Maieſtie. ,

Meſ.
She creepes:her motion, & her ſtation are as one:
She ſhewes a body, rather then a life,
A Statue, then a Breather.

Cleo.
Is this certaine?

Meſ.
Or I haue no obſeruance.

Cha.
Three in Egypt cannot make better note.

Cleo.
He's very knowing, I do perceiu't,
There's nothing in her yet.
The Fellow ha's good iudgement.

Char.
Excellent.

Cleo.
Gueſſe at her yeares, I prythee.

Meſſ.
Madam, ſhe was a widdow.

Cleo.
Widdow? Charmian, hearke.

Meſ.
And I do thinke ſhe's thirtie.

Cle.
Bear'ſt thou her face in mind? is't long or round?

Meſſ.
Round, euen to faultineſſe.

Cleo.
For the moſt part too, they are fooliſh that are
ſo. Her haire what colour?

Meſſ.
Browne Madam: and her forehead
As low as ſhe would wiſh it.

Cleo.
There's Gold for thee,
Thou muſt not take my former ſharpeneſſe ill,
I will employ thee backe againe: I finde thee
Moſt fit for buſineſſe. Go, make thee ready,
Our Letters are prepar'd.

Char.
A proper man.

Cleo.
Indeed he is ſo: I repent me much
That ſo I harried him. Why me think's by him,
This Creature's no ſuch thing.

Char.
Nothing Madam.

Cleo.
The man hath ſeene ſome Maieſty, and ſhould
know.

Char.
Hath he ſeene Maieſtie? Iſis elſe defend: and
ſeruing you ſo long.

Cleopa.
I haue one thing more to aske him yet good
Charmian: but 'tis no matter, thou ſhalt bring him to me
where I will write; all may be well enough.

Char.
I warrant you Madam. Exeunt.

load focus Notes (Horace Howard Furness, 1907)
load focus Notes (Horace Howard Furness, 1907)
load focus English (W. G. Clark, W. Aldis Wright)
hide References (8 total)
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • M. W. MacCallum, Shakespeare's Roman Plays and their Background, 4.15
  • Cross-references in text-specific dictionaries to this page (7):
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