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[Scene VI.]


Enter Cominius as it were in retire, with ſoldiers.

Com.
Breath you my friends, wel fought, we are come off,
Like Romans, neither fooliſh in our ſtands,
Nor Cowardly in retyre: Beleeue me Sirs,
We ſhall be charg'd againe. Whiles we haue ſtrooke
By Interims and conueying guſts, we haue heard
The Charges of our Friends. The Roman Gods,
Leade their ſucceſſes, as we wiſh our owne,
That both our powers, with ſmiling Fronts encountring,
May giue you thankfull Sacrifice. Thy Newes?
Enter a Meſſenger.

Meſſ.
The Cittizens of Corioles haue yſſued,
And giuen to Lartius and to Martius Battaile:
I ſaw our party to their Trenches driuen,
And then I came away.

Com.
Though thou ſpeakeſt truth,
Me thinkes thou ſpeak'ſt not well. How long is't ſince?

Meſ.
Aboue an houre, my Lord.

Com.
'Tis not a mile: briefely we heard their drummes.
How could'ſt thou in a mile confound an houre,
And bring thy Newes ſo late?

Meſ.
Spies of the Volces
Held me in chace, that I was forc'd to wheele
Three or foure miles about, elſe had I ſir
Halfe an houre ſince brought my report.
Enter Martius.

Com.
Whoſe yonder,
That doe's appeare as he were Flead? O Gods,
He has the ſtampe of Martius, and I haue
Before time ſeene him thus.

Mar.
Come I too late?

Com.
The Shepherd knowes not Thunder frõ a Taber,
More then I know the ſound of Martius Tongue
From euery meaner man.

Martius.
Come I too late?

Com.
I, if you come not in the blood of others,
But mantled in your owne.

Mart.
Oh| let me clip ye
In Armes as ſound, as when I woo'd in heart;
As merry, as when our Nuptiall day was done,
And Tapers burnt to Bedward.

Com.
Flower of Warriors, how is't with Titus Lartius?

Mar.
As with a man buſied about Decrees:
Condemning ſome to death, and ſome to exile,
Ranſoming him, or pittying, threatning th'other;
Holding Corioles in the name of Rome,
Euen like a fawning Grey-hound in the Leaſh,
To let him ſlip at will.

Com.
Where is that Slaue
Which told me they had beate you to your Trenches?
Where is he? Call him hither.

Mar.
Let him alone,
He did informe the truth: but for our Gentlemen,
The common file, (a plague-Tribunes for them)
The Mouſe ne're ſhunn'd the Cat, as they did budge
From Raſcals worſe then they.

Com.
But how preuail'd you?

Mar.
Will the time ſerue to tell, I do not thinke:
Where is the enemy? Are you Lords a'th Field?
If not, why ceaſe you till you are ſo?

Com.
Martius, we haue at diſaduantage fought,
And did retyre to win our purpoſe.

Mar.
How lies their Battell? Know you on wc ſide
They haue plac'd their men of truſt?

Com.
As I gueſſe Martius,
Their Bands i'th Vaward are the Antients
Of their beſt truſt: O're them Auffidious,
Their very heart of Hope.

Mar.
I do beſeech you,
By all the Battailes wherein we haue fought,
By th'Blood we haue ſhed together,
By th'Vowes we haue made
To endure Friends, that you directly fet me
Againſt Affidious, and his Antiats, but
And that you not delay the preſent
Filling the aire with Swords aduanc'd) and Darts,
We proue this very houre.

Com.
Though I could wiſh,
You were conducted to a gentle Bath,
And Balmes applyed to you, yet dare I neuer
Deny your asking, take your choice of thoſe
That beſt can ayde your action.

Mar.
Thoſe are they
That moſt are willing; if any ſuch be heere,
(As it were ſinne to doubt) that loue this painting
Wherein you ſee me ſmear'd, if any feare
Leſſen his perſon, then an ill report:
If any thinke, braue death out-weighes bad life,
And that his Countries deerer then himſelfe,
Let him alone: Or ſo many ſo minded,
Waue thus to expreſſe his diſpoſition,
And follow Martius.
They all ſhout and waue their ſwords, take him vp in their
Armes, and caſt vp their Caps.
Oh me alone, make you a ſword of me:
If theſe ſhewes be not outward, which of you
But is foure Volces? None of you, but is
Able to beare againſt the great Auffidious
A Shield, as hard as his. A certaine number
(Though thankes to all) muſt I ſelect from all:
The reſt ſhall beare the buſineſſe in ſome other fight
(As cau<*>e will be obey'd:) pleaſe you to March,
And foure ſhall quickly draw out my Command,
Which men are beſt inclin'd.

Com.
March on my Fellowes:
Make good this oſtentation, and you ſhall
Diuide in all, with vs. Exeunt

load focus Notes (Horace Howard Furness, Jr., A. B.; Litt. D.)
load focus Notes (Horace Howard Furness, Jr., A. B.; Litt. D.)
load focus English (W. G. Clark, W. Aldis Wright)
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