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7.
Athens and Thracian Neapolis
IG I3 101 Athens, EM 6598 410/9 Plate 4

Nine fragments, all from Akropolis and South Slope: EM 6598, eight fragments reconstructed in BSA 46 (1951) pl. 23, and EM 6589, location in text uncertain. Left edge of inscription, right edge of relief preserved, back rough-picked. Three fragments preserve parts of relief; two join and constitute right half of relief, the third joins left side of inscription. Surface battered. White, medium-grained marble. p.h. of restored stele 1.36, p.h. of relief 0.345, w. 0.58, th. 0.065, relief h. 0.01, h. of letters 0.025 (lines 2-3), 0.01 (lines 4-38), 0.007 (lines 39 ff.).

The stele records two decrees concerning Athens and Thracian Neapolis, a strategically important ally who in this period remained loyal to Athens in her struggles with Neapolis' mother city Thasos. The first decree (lines 4-46), passed in the sixth prytany of the archonship of [Gl]aukippos and therefore in the winter of 410/9 (lines 4-6), honoured the people of Neapolis for supporting Athens in its battle with Thasos, which had been in revolt after the Sicilian expedition (Thuc. 8.64). Two copies of this decree were to have been set up at the expense of the Neapolitans, one apparently on the Akropolis and the other in Neapolis in the sanctuary of the Parthenos (lines 42-45). The second decree (lines 48-64), passed after the recovery of Thasos in 407 (Diod. 13.72, 1; Xen. Hell. 1.4.9), praises Neapolis for its continued loyalty. Both the second decree and a line recording an expenditure late in 410/9 (line 47) were carved by different hands and must therefore be later additions to the stone. The stele was originally carved and set up in the sixth prytany of 410/9.

On the right side of the relief stands an Athena of the angelehnte type (cf. nos. 65, 76, 98) facing left, leaning on her shield and extending her right hand, which is broken off at the wrist. On the left side of the relief stood a figure of whom only the right foot is preserved. The ball of the foot rests on the ground and the heel is raised, suggesting that the figure turned toward Athena and clasped her extended right hand. The figure is probably the Parthenos of Neapolis, who is specifically mentioned in the inscription and who appears on an Athenian decree of 356/55 concerning the same city (no. 28). The elastic pose of Athena's body and the transparency of her drapery are typical of works ca. 410, but the drapery does not cling like the drapery of the accounts of the treasurers of Athena of 410/9 (no. 8).

K. S. Pittakys, ArchEph (1839) 224 no. 244; Rangabé I, 354-55 no. 273; IG I 51; F. von Duhn, AZ (1877) 158 no. 52; S. A. Koumanoudes, Athenaion 5 (1876/77) 86-89 no. 5; A. Milchhüfer, AM 5 (1880) 206 n. 1; Sybel, 288 no. 3997; Studniczka, 11-13, pl. A on p. 12 (drwg.); IG I Suppl. pp. 15-18; SIG3 107; Walter, Beschreibung, 17; IG I2 108; A. Hekler, JdI 42 (1927) 71, fig. 9; A. Praschniker, Antike Plastik, W. Amelung zum sechzigsten Geburtstag (1928) 176-81, fig. 5; Diepolder, 21; Binneboeßel, 6 no. 15, 20, 22, 23, 25, 38-41, 43, 50, 57; H. Speier, RM 47 (1932) 28, 90; P. Collart, Philippes, ville de Macédoine, depuis des origines jusqu'à la fin de l'époque romaine (1937) 127-30, pl. 22.1; Svoronos, 663 no. 427, pl. 204; Süsserott, 16, 30 n. 12, 198, 199 n. 11, 200, 201 n. 20; Picard II.2, 838; J. Marcadé, RA 17 (1941) 219; Tod I, 207-10 no. 84; SEG 10.124; B. D. Meritt and A. Andrewes, BSA 46 (1951) 200-9, pl. 23; Andrewes, JHS 73 (1953) 6-8; Pouilloux, Cultes de Thasos I, 155-60, pl. 14.1; SEG 12.37; Dohrn, 18, 39; Picard IV.2, 1256 n. 2, fig. 492; Karouzou, 153-59, fig. 8; F. Eckstein, AntP 4 (1965) 31, fig. 7; E. Berger, AntK 10 (1967) 85, pl. 24.4 (det.); Meiggs and Lewis, 271-75 no. 89; Schmaltz, 22 n. 26, 23; Hiller, 54, 63; Bradeen and McGregor, 125-26; Mitropoulou, Corpus I, 174 no. 14, fig. 159; Meyer, 269 A 15, pl. 5.2; SEG 36.17 and 44.

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