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65.
Athens honours Apollonophanes of Kolophon
IG I3 65 Athens, EM 6615 ca. 427/26 Plate 34

Three fragments: EM 6615 (a, found on Akropolis), EM 6593 (b, found in south-facing wall of Akropolis near Brauronian sanctuary, c, found at north-east base of Akropolis). Fragment a has battered relief preserving right edge, otherwise broken all around. Relief separated from inscription by badly chipped moulding. White, medium-grained marble. p.h. 0.41, p.h. of relief 0.31, p.w. 0.36, th. 0.12, h. of letters 0.02 (lines 1-2), 0.012 (lines 3 ff.).

The decree honours an otherwise unknown Apollonophanes of Kolophon for responsibilities related to the security of the harbour of Notion. It is generally accepted that he is being honoured in connection with events in Kolophon in 427, in which the Athenian general Paches intervened against the pro-Persian party besieging the harbour town of Notion and settled loyal Kolophonian refugees there (Thuc. 3.34).

At the right stands Athena, a combination of the Parthenos and angelehnte types, with a shield on her left and a large coiled snake on her right. She rests her left elbow, now barely visible, on the rim of her shield and with her right hand crowns the smaller figure of Apollonophanes who stands on the left, facing Athena with his right hand raised. There might have been room for a third figure on the left. The only area of undamaged drapery reveals the straight, uniformly rounded folds over Athena's weight leg and the curved loop extending from the ankle of her free leg that are characteristic of the peplophoroi of the 420s to the end of the century (nos. 3, 7, 8); the relative thickness of the drapery argues for a date close to that of the Rheitos bridge decree relief (no. 3) and the frieze of the Nike Temple. (For other versions of the Parthenos, see nos. 16, 30, 106, 132, 164. For the leaning type, see nos. 7, 76, 98.)

Rangabé I, 346-47 no. 262; Müller and Schöll, 53 no. 29, 75; K. S. Pittakys, ArchEph (1854) 1141 no. 2208; P. Pervanoglu, AZ 18 (1860) 25-26 no. 15; Pittakys, ArchEph (1862) 125 no. 117; Pervanoglu, AZ 25 (1867) 46 no. 4; Schune, 49 no. 96, pl. 22 (drwg.); IG 1 36 and 74; A. Dumont, BCH 2 (1878) 566; Sybel, 406 no. 6620; Studniczka, 13; Friederichs and Wolters, 382 no. 1157; Le Bas, pl. 38.1 (drwg.); IG I Suppl. III, p. 195, 1162; A. Wilhelm, ÖJhBeibl 1 (1898) 44; Walter, Beschreibung, 9; Wilhelm, ÖJh 21-22 (1922-24) 156-58; IG 12 59, Add. p. 302; Binneboeßel, 3 no. 2, 20, 25-26, 39, 40; Svoronos, 665 no. 431 (4), pl. 207.4; Süsserott, 16 n. 11, 197-99, 201 n. 20; Picard II., 837-38; Walter, ÖJh 32 (1940) 8 n. 28; J. Marcadé, RA 17 (1941) 219; B. D. Meritt, Hesperia 14 (1945) 118; Kirchner, 17 no. 36, pl. 16; SEG 10.70; Karouzou, 155-56, ill. 2 (drwg.); Guarducci, 593; Hiller, 62; Rauscher, 156; Mitropoulou, Contributions, 55 no. 7e, fig. 12; Corpus I, 172 no. 6, fig. 78; Walbank, 202-11 no. 39, pls. 19, 20; SEG 28.12; A. Gerolymatos, Espionage and Treason: a Study of the Proxenia in Political and Military Intelligence Gathering in Classical Greece (Amsterdam 1986) 58-61; Meyer, 265 A 2, pl. 1.2; SEG 36.8.

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