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Yale 1913.102

BLACK-FIGURE KOMAST CUP


Lent by the Yale University Art Gallery; gift of Rebecca Darlington Stoddard (1913.102)


Height: 3 7/16 in. (8.7 cm.); Width: 7 9/16 in. (19.3 cm.)


Broken and repaired.


Interior: black.

Exterior, side A: komos. Three youths dancing; the central youth holds a drinking horn. In the field, rosettes.

Side B: a man and two youths dancing; the central youth holds a drinking horn. In the field, rosettes.

Under the handles, rosettes with volutes; on the lip, rosettes; at the base, rays.

Red: costumes of the dancers, parts of the rosettes and palmettes.


Attributed to the KY Painter of the Komast Group [Beazley] ca. 590 - 570 B. C.

Komast cups are the earliest Attic kylikes in black-figure. The form of the cup, with short offset lip and short conical foot, is similar to that of Corinthian cups but lightened and improved. The komasts, or padded dancers, are also of Corinthian origin; they are one of the favorite subjects on these cups and give the group its name (Beazley 1951, 19-21). The palmette ornament beneath the handle is also Corinthian, but the thin stems and heavy ends of the volutes are distinctly Attic (Payne 1931, 198).


Bibliography

Baur 1922, 69, no. 102, pl. III below, fig. 21 right.

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