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adversor (archaic advor- ), ātus, 1, v. dep. adversus: alicui,
I.to stand opposite to one, to be against, i. e. to resist or oppose (in his opinions, feelings, intentions, etc.; while resistere and obsistere denote resistance through external action, Doed. Syn. 4, 303; cf. adversarius; class.; freq. in Cic.); constr. with dat. or absol.: “idem ego arbitror nee tibi advorsari certum est de istac re usquam, soror,Plaut. Aul. 2, 1, 21: “meis praeceptis,id. As. 3, 1, 5; so id. Trin. 2, 1, 108: “mihi,Ter. Hec. 4, 4, 32; 2, 2, 3: “hujus libidini,Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 31, § 81: “ornamentis tuis,id. Sull. 18, 50: “Isocrati,id. Or. 51, 172: “commodis,Tac. A. 1, 27: “adversantes imperio Domini,Vulg. Deut. 1, 43: “invitā Minervā, id est, adversante et repugnante natura,Cic. Off. 1, 31: “non adversatur jus, quo minus, etc.,id. Fin. 3, 20: “adversante vento,Tac. H. 3, 42: “adversantibus amicis,id. Ann. 13, 12: “adversans factio,Suet. Caes. 11: “adversantibus diis,Curt. 6, 10: “non adversata petenti Annuit,Verg. A. 4, 127; Vulg. 2 Thess. 2, 4 al.!*?
a. In Tac. constr. also adversari aliquem, H. 1, 1; 1, 38.—
b. In Plaut. pleonastic, adversari contra, Cas. 2, 3, 35, and adversari adversus aliquid, Mer. 2, 3, 43.
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