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aegrĭtūdo , ĭnis, f. aeger,
I.illness, sickness (both of body and mind; while aegrotatio denotes only physical disease).
I. Lit., of the body of men and brutes (only after the Aug. per.): “visi sunt (elephanti) fessi aegritudine,Plin. 8, 1, 1, § 3: “metu et aegritudine fessus,Tac. A. 2, 29; so id. ib. 2, 69; Curt. 3, 5; Flor. 4, 7; Eutr. 9, 5 al.— “Also of plants: sunt enim quaedam aegritudines (ficorum) et locorum,Plin. 17, 24, 37, § 223.—Far oftener,
II. Of mind, grief, sorrow, care, etc. (class.; freq. in the Ciceronian philos.), Pac. ap. Non. 322, 18; 13, 29: “aegritudo animam adimit,Plaut. Trin. 4, 3, 84; so id. Bacch. 5, 1, 24; id. Capt. 4, 2, 2; id. Curc. 2, 1, 9; id. Men. prol. 35; id. Merc. 2, 3, 24 al.: praeclare nostri, ut alia multa, molestiam, sollicitudinem, angorem propter similitudinem corporum aegrorum, aegritudinem nominaverunt; “and soon after: ut aegrotatio in corpore, sic aegritudo in animo,Cic. Tusc. 3, 10; so id. ib. 3, 7; 9; 12; 13; 14; 26; 4, 7; 15; id. Fam. 5, 13 fin. al.; Sall. J. 84.—In the plur., Ter. Heaut. 3, 2, 28; Cic. Tusc. 3, 19; 4, 15; Sen. Ep. 50.
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