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ap-pōno (adp- , Ritschl, Fleck., Lachm., Baiter, Halm; app- , Merk., Kayser, K. and H., Weissenb.), pōsŭi, pŏsĭtum, 3, v. a. (
I.perf. apposivi, Plaut. Mil. 3, 3, 31; App. ap. Prisc. p. 898 P.; cf. pono), to place, put, or lay at, near or by the side of a thing; to apply to, add, unite, etc. (class. in prose and poetry; syn.: addo, adicio, adjungo).
I. Lit.
B. Esp.
2. Aliquem alicui or alicui rei, to appoint or designate one to any service or duty, to place in any station, to join to as an aid: “custodem Tullio me apponite,Cic. Div. in Caecil. 16, 51; so Tac. A. 4, 60; cf.: adpositus custodiae (dat.), id. ib. 1, 6; “2, 68: accusator apponitur civis Romanus,Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 29, § 74; so id. ib. 2, 1, 5, § 41 fin.: “calumniatores,id. ib. 2, 2, 10: “praevaricatorem,id. Phil. 2, 11: “non illicitatorem venditor adponet,id. Off. 3, 15, 61; cf. Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 54: “custodes,Nep. Dion, 4, 5: “moderator et magister consulibus appositus,Liv. 2, 18, 6; so, “rectorem,Suet. Aug. 48: “scrutatores,id. Claud. 35 al.
II. Trop.
A. Of the mind, to apply (eccl. Lat.): “appone cor ad doctrinam,Vulg. Prov. 22, 17: “apposui cor meum, ut etc.,ib. Eccl. 8, 16.—
B. In eccl. Lat., after the Hebrew, of an act, to do further, also to do something: “non apponet, ut complacitior sit adhuc?Vulg. Psa. 76, 8; so ib. Act. 12, 3: “apposuerunt adhuc peccare,ib. Psa. 77, 17; 88, 23.—
C. With a dat. of end, to set down for something, count, reckon, or consider as, to hold as (very rare): “cum is nil promereat, postulare id gratiae adponi sibi,Ter. And. 2, 1, 32 (addi in gratiam suam, Don.): “aliquid lucro,Hor. C. 1, 9, 15.—Hence, appŏsĭ-tus (adp- ), a, um, P. a., put or applied to, etc.
A. Of relations of space, placed or situated at or near to, contiguous to, bordering upon; constr. with dat.: “regio mari adposita,Plin. 3, 18, 22, § 126: “platanus itineri,id. 12, 1, 5, § 9: “castellum Lupiae flumini adpositum,Tac. A. 2, 7.—Trop.: “audacia fidentiae non contrarium, sed appositum ac propinquum,Cic. Inv. 2, 54, 165.—
B. Metaph.
1. Fit, proper, suitable, appropriate, apposite, etc. (like aptus, q. v.; hence in MSS. freq. interchanged with it; cf. Spald. ad Quint. 3, 11, 9); constr. with ad (in this signif. very freq. in Varr. and Cic.; “elsewhere very rare, perh. not found except in Quint. and Gell.): ager ad vitem adpositus,Varr. R. R. 1, 7, 5: “loca adposita ad faenum, ad vinum, ad oleum,id. ib. 1, 23, 1: “equus ad medendum adpositus,id. ib. 2, 7, 5: “(gallinae) adpositissimae ad partum,id. ib. 3, 9, 9; “2, 10, 4: menses ad agendum maxime appositi,Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 11; 2, 5, 41 fin.; id. Att. 3, 14: “multo appositior ad deferenda,Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 57: “argumentatio appositissima ad judicationem,id. Inv. 1, 14. —*
2. Inclined to; constr. with dat.: “judex juri magis an aequo sit adpositus,Quint. 4, 3, 11 (cf.: “adclinis falsis animus,Hor. S. 2, 2, 6).—
3. Subst.: appŏsĭtum , i, n., in rhet. and gram., an epithet, adjective: “adposita, quae epitheta dicuntur, ut dulce mustum,Quint. 8, 2, 10; 2, 14, 3; 9, 4, 24.—Hence, appŏsĭtē , adv., suitably, fitly, etc.: “ad persuasionem,Cic. Inv. 1, 5; cf. Spald ad Quint. 2, 15, 3 praeclare et apposite et facete scribere, Gell. 2, 23, 11 (comp. and sup not used).
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