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barba , ae, f. cf. O. H. Germ. part; Germ. Bart; Engl. beard.
I. Lit., the beard, of men: “alba,Plaut. Bacch. 5, 1, 15: “hirquina,id. Ps. 4, 2, 12: “mollis,Lucr. 5, 673: “promissa,long, Nep. Dat. 3, 1; Liv. 5, 41, 9; Tac. A. 2, 31; id. G. 31: “immissa,Verg. A. 3, 593; Ov. M. 12, 351; Quint. 12, 3, 12: “stiriaque inpexis induruit horrida barbis,Verg. G. 3, 366: submittere (as a sign of mourning). Suet. Caes. 67; id. Aug. 23; id. Calig. 24: “prima,Juv. 8, 166: “barbam tondere,Cic. Tusc. 5, 20, 58: “maxima barba,Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 25, § 62: “major,id. Agr. 2, 5, 13: “ponere,Hor. A. P. 298; Suet. Calig. 5; 10; id. Ner. 12: “jam libet hirsutam tibi falce recidere barbam,Ov. M. 13, 766: “abradere,to clip off. Plin. 6, 28, 32, § 162; cf. Baumg.Crus. Suet. Caes. 45: “rasitare,Gell. 3, 4: barbam vellere alicui, to pluck one by the beard (an insult), Hor. S. 1, 3, 133: “sapientem pascere barbam,” i. e. to study the Stoic philosophy, id. ib. 2, 3, 35; Pers. 1, 133; 2, 28: “capillatior quam ante barbāque majore,Cic. Agr. 2, 5, 13; Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 25, § 62: “in gens et cana barba,Plin. Ep. 1, 10, 6.—Sometimes in plur. of a heavy, long beard, Petr. 99, 5; App. M. 4, p. 157, 1.—The statues of the gods had barbas aureas, Cic. N. D. 3, 34, 83; “hence, barbam auream habere = deum esse,Petr. 58, 6; cf. Pers. 2, 56.—The ancient Romans allowed the beard to grow long (hence, barbati, Cic. Mur. 12; id. Cael. 14, 33; id. Fin. 4, 23, 62; Juv. 4, 103; and: “dignus barbā capillisque Majorum, of an upright, honest man,Juv. 16, 31), until A.U.C. 454, when a certain P. Titinius Menas brought barbers to Rome from Sicily, and introduced the custom of shaving the beard, Varr R. R. 2, 11, 10; Plin. 7, 59, 59, § 211. Scipio Africanus was the first who caused himself to be shaved daily, Plin. 1. 1. Still, this custom seems to have become general first in the Aug. per.; cf. Boettig. Sabina, 2, p. 57 sq.; Goer. Cic. Fin. 4, 23, 62.—Young men allowed the beard to grow for some years; “hence. juvenes barbatuli or bene barbati (v. barbatulus and barbatus). It was the custom to devote the first beard cut off to some deity, esp. to Apollo, Jupiter, or Venus,Petr. 29; Juv. 3, 186; Suet. Ner. 12.—
II. Transf.
B. Of plants, the wool: “nucum,Plin. 15, 22, 24, § 89; cf. id. 17, 23, 35, § 202.—
C. Barba Jovis, a shrub, the silver-leaved woolblade: Anthyllis barba Jovis, Linn.; Plin. 16, 18, 31, § 76.
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