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Concordĭa , ae,
I.nom. propr.
I. The goddess of Concord, Gr. Ὁμόνοια, to whom several temples were dedicated at Rome, usually after civil strife; the oldest was founded by Camillus, A. U. C. 386, and renewed by Tiberius and Livia, A. U. C. 762, Ov. F. 1, 639 sqq.; Suet. Tib. 20; a second was consecrated by Cn. Flavius after the Samnite war, Liv. 9, 46, 6; Plin. 33, 1, 6, § 19; cf. Liv. 40, 19, 2; a third by Opimius after the disturbances led by the Gracchi, Aug. Civ. Dei, 3, 25; “the Senate frequently met in one of these, probably the first,Cic. Phil. 2, 8, 19; Sall. C. 46, 4; cf. also Varr. L. L. 5, § 73 Müll.; Cic. N. D. 2, 23, 61; 3, 18, 47; Liv. 9, 46, 6; 22, 33, 7; Ov. F. 2, 631; 3, 881; 6, 91; Tac. H. 3, 68 al.
II. Of persons.
A. A surname of the emperor Vitellius, Suet. Vit. 15 fin.
B. The name of a female slave, Dig. 40, 5, 40 init.
III. The name of several towns, esp.,
A. A Roman colony in the Venetian territory, now Concordia, Mel. 2, 4, 3; Plin. 3, 18, 22, § 126; Aur. Vict. Epit. 16, 5.—
B. A town in Lusitania, now La Guarda, whose inhabitants are called Concordĭenses , ĭum, m., Plin. 4, 22, 35, § 118.—
C. A town in Gallia Belgica, near the modern Weissenburg, Amm. 16, 12, 58 al.
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