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congressus , ūs, m. congredior,
I.a coming or going together, in a friendly or hostile manner (class. in prose and poetry).
I. A friendly meeting, a social assembly, conference, conversation, etc.: “omnes congressum tuum fugiunt,Cic. Sest. 52, 111; id. Phil. 12, 11, 26; id. Att. 1, 17, 2: “si quis congressus fuerit mihi cum Caesare,id. ib. 11, 12, 3; id. Cael. 8, 20; Liv. 7, 4, 4; Quint. 1, 2, 20; Tac. A. 13, 46 et saep.—In plur., Cic. Or. 10, 33; id. Lael. 23, 87; Liv. 1, 19, 5; 7, 40, 3; Tac. A. 2, 28; Verg. A. 5, 733 al.—Also of the companionship of animals, Cic. N. D. 2, 48, 124; Quint. 1, 2, 20.—
B. Pregn., a close union, combination (very rare): “materiaï,Lucr. 5, 68; cf.: “duriorum (consonantium) inter se,Quint. 11, 3, 35.— In plur., Lucr. 2, 1065.—Hence, carnal union, copulation: “feminarum,Plin. 12, 14, 30, § 54; cf. congressio, I. B.—
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