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dis-cumbo , cŭbŭi, cŭbĭtum, 3,
I.v. n., to lie down.
I. More freq., to recline at table for the purpose of eating (cf. accumbo—so esp. freq. since the Aug. per.): “discubuimus omnes praeter illam,Cic. Att. 5, 1, 4; Lucr. 3, 912; Quint. 11, 2, 13; Suet. Caes. 48; Tib. 2, 5, 95; Verg. A. 1, 708; Ov. M. 8, 566; Vulg. Johan. 12, 2 al.—Sometimes of a single person (yet always with the accessory idea of a number reclining at the same time): “in convivio Germanici cum super eum Piso discumberet,Tac. A. 3, 14; 6, 50; Suet. Aug. 74; Curt. 8, 5, 6; Juv. 5, 12.—Pass. impers.: “discumbitur,Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 26; Verg. A. 1, 700; Gell. 3, 19 al.
II. Rarely, to lie down to sleep: “discubitum noctu ire,Plaut. Merc. 1, 1, 100: “cenati discubuerunt ibidem,Cic. Inv. 2, 4, 14.
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