previous next
ĕpistŭla (also in Cic. and ante- and post-class., ĕpistŏla , Corss. Ausspr. 2, 141; but cf. Brambach, Hülfsb. p. 35 sq. Ritschl, Opusc. 2, 493 note), ae, f., = ἐπιστολή.
I. In gen., a written communication, a letter, epistle (cf.: “litterae, codicilli): venio nunc ad tuas litteras, quas pluribus epistolis accepi,Cic. Q. Fr. 3, 1, 3, § 8; Plaut. Bacch. 3, 6, 32; 4, 9, 83; id. Mil. 4, 6, 10 et saep.; Cic. Phil. 2, 31; Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 69 fin.; id. Fam. 2, 4 et saep.; Hor. Ep. 2, 2, 22; Ov. H. 15, 219; 17, 1; 18, 217 et saep.: “epistolam obsignare,Cic. Att. 8, 6, 1: “Narcissus ab epistolis,the secretary, Suet. Claud. 28; cf. ab.—In the plur.: “epistulae (cf. litterae), of a single letter (post-class.),Just. 1, 6, 1; 11, 12, 9; Plin. Ep. 10, 5, 1 al.; Tac. A. 1, 30; cf.: “unis aut binis epistolis,Mamert. Grat. Act. Jul. 9, 2.—
II. In partic., an imperial letter or reply, stating the emperor's will as law (cf.: “rescriptum, decretum, edictum),Just. Inst. 1, 2, 6; Front. Aq. 105 et saep.
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: