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excessus , ūs, m. excedo, I. A. 2. and B. 2..
I. A departure.
A. In gen.: “excessus ejus,Vell. 1, 15, 1.—Esp., a departure from life: “in his esse et excessum e vita et in vita mansionem,Cic. Fin. 3, 18, 60; Val. Max. 9, 13 prooem.; Sen. Ep. 26, 4; “for which also, vitae,Cic. Tusc. 1, 12, 27; Val. Max. 7, 2, ext. 1: “post obitum, vel potius excessum Romuli,Cic. Rep. 2, 30; cf. “so of Romulus,id. ib. 2, 12; once in Cic. Leg. 1, 1, 3; “and freq. in post-Aug. prose excessus alone,death, Tac. A. 1, 7; 14; Suet. Tib. 22; 70; id. Calig. 1; 9; 48; id. Ner. 5; id. Vesp. 3 al.
B. Trop., a leaving of the mental powers, loss of self-possession, = ἔκστασις: “in excessu mentis,Vulg. Act. 11, 5; id. Psa. 30, 22.—Without mentis: “ego dixi in excessu meo,Vulg. Psa. 115, 2.—
II. A standing out, projecting beyond a certain limit. *
A. Lit.: “os calcis quadam parte sinuatur, quadam excessus habet,projections, Cels. 8, 1 fin.: “montani excessus,Sol. 9, 2; Amm. 18, 6, 15: “flexuosi excessus,id. 24, 4, 10.—
B. Trop.
1. A departing from the subject, digression (post-Aug.): “egressio vel (quod usitatius esse coepit) excessus, sive est extra causam, etc.,Quint. 3, 9, 4; cf. ib. § 1; Plin. Ep. 9, 26, 9; and in plur., Plin. H. N. praef. § 12.—
2. A deviation, aberration from any thing: “minuti a pudore excessus,Val. Max. 8, 2, 4: “moderaminis,Prud. in Symm. 2, 990.
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