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in-clīno , āvi, ātum, 1, v. a. and n. clino, clinatus.
I. Act., to cause to lean, bend, incline, turn a thing in any direction; to bend down, bow a thing.
A. Lit.
2. In partic.
a. In milit. lang., to cause to fall back or give way: “ut Hostus cecidit, confestim Romana inclinatur acies,” i. e. loses ground, retreats, Liv. 1, 12, 3: “tum inclinari rem in fugam apparuit,id. 7, 33, 7: “quasdam acies inclinatas jam et labantes,Tac. G. 8; cf. under II. —
b. In gen., to turn back, cause to move backward: “septemtrio inclinatum stagnum eodem quo aestus ferebat,Liv. 26, 45, 8: “cum primum aestu fretum inclinatum est,id. 29, 7, 2.—
c. In mal. part., to lie down, stretch out: “jam inclinabo me cum liberta tua,Plaut. Pers. 4, 8, 7: “quot discipulos inclinet Hamillus,Juv. 10, 224: “ipsos maritos,id. 9, 26.—
3. Transf., of color, to incline to: “colore ad aurum inclinato,Plin. 15, 11, 10, § 37: “coloris in luteum inclinati,id. 24, 15, 86, § 136.—
4. Of a disease, to abate, diminish: “morbus inclinatus,Cels. 3, 2: “febris se inclinat,id. ib. al.—
B. Trop.
1. In gen., to turn or incline a person or thing in any direction: “se ad Stoicos,Cic. Fin. 3, 3, 10: “culpam in aliquem,to lay the blame upon, Liv. 5, 8, 12: “quo se fortuna, eodem etiam favor hominum inclinat,Just. 5, 1 fin.: “judicem inclinat miseratio,moves, Quint. 4, 1, 14: “haec animum inclinant, ut credam, etc.,Liv. 29, 33, 10.—Mid.: “quamquam inclinari opes ad Sabinos, rege inde sumpto videbantur,Liv. 1, 18, 5.—
2. In partic.
a. To change, alter, and esp. for the worse, to bring down, abase, cause to decline: “se fortuna inclinaverat,Caes. B. C. 1, 52, 3: “omnia simul inclinante fortuna,Liv. 33, 18, 1: “ut me paululum inclinari timore viderunt, sic impulerunt,to give way, yield, Cic. Att. 3, 13, 2: “eloquentiam,Quint. 10, 1, 80.—
b. To throw upon, remove, transfer: “haec omnia in dites a pauperibus inclinata onera,Liv. 1, 43, 9: “omnia onera, quae communia quondam fuerint, inclinasse in primores civitatis,id. 1, 47, 12.—In gram., to form or inflect a word by a change of termination (postclass.): “(vinosus aut vitiosus) a vocabulis, non a verbo inclinata sunt,Gell. 3, 12, 3; 4, 9, 12; 18, 5, 9: “partim hoc in loco adverbium est, neque in casus inclinatur,id. 10, 13, 1.—
II. Neutr., to bend, turn, incline, decline, sink.
A. Lit. (rare, and not in Cic.): “paulum inclinare necesse est corpora,Lucr. 2, 243: “sol inclinat,Juv. 3, 316: “inclinare meridiem sentis,Hor. C. 3, 28, 5 (for which: “sol se inclinavit,Liv. 9, 32, 6; “v. above I. A. 1.): in vesperam inclinabat dies,Curt. 6, 11, 9.—
2. In partic., in milit. lang., to yield, give way: “ita conflixerunt, ut aliquamdin in neutram partem inclinarent acies,Liv. 7, 33, 7: “in fugam,id. 34, 28 fin.: “inclinantes jam legiones,Tac. A. 1, 64; id. H. 3, 83.—
3. To change for the worse, turn, fail: “si fortuna belli inclinet,Liv. 3, 61, 5: “inde initia magistratuum nostrum meliora ferme, et finis inclinat,Tac. A. 15, 21. —
2. In partic., to change, alter from its former condition (very rare): “inclinant jam fata ducum,change, Luc. 3, 752. — Hence, in-clīnātus , a, um, P. a.
A. Bent down, sunken: “senectus,Calp. 5, 13; of the voice, low, deep: “vox,Cic. Or. 17, 56; cf.: “inclinata ululantique voce more Asiatico canere,id. ib. 8, 27. —
C. Sunken, fallen, deteriorated: “ab excitata fortuna ad inclinatam et prope jacentem desciscere,Cic. Fam. 2, 16, 1: “copiae,Nep. Pelop. 5, 4.—In neutr. plur. subst.: “rerum inclinata ferre,” i. e. troubles, misfortunes, Sil. 6, 119.
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