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in-dŏcĭlis , e, adj. 2. in-doceo.
I. Difficult to be taught, that cannot be taught, indocile.
A. Lit. (class): quia nimis indociles quidam tardique sunt, Cic. N. D. 1, 5, 12; so, “hebetes et indociles homines,Quint. 1, 1, 2: “hirundines,Plin. 10, 45, 62, § 128.—Poet. with gen.: “pacis,Sil. 12, 726. —With dat.: “quieti,Juv. 11, 11.—With inf.: “pauperiem pati,Hor. C. 1, 1, 18: “loqui,Luc. 5, 539; Sil. 13, 310: “teneri,Stat. Th. 6, 313. —Of the things to be taught: “sed incredibilis quaedam ingenii magnitudo non desideravit indocilem usus disciplinam,Cic. Ac. 2, 1, 2. —
B. Transf., untaught, unlearned, ignorant (poet. and post-Aug.): “genus,Verg. A. 8, 321: “agricola caeli,Plin. 18, 25, 60, § 226.—Of inanim. and abstr. things, untaught, rude: “indocili numero,Ov. Tr. 4, 1, 6.—Unapt, unfit for any thing: “arbores nasci alibi, quam ubi coepere,Plin. 14 prooem. init. § 1.— *
II. (= non doctus.) Untaught, not shown: “et sciat indociles currere lympha vias,Prop. 1, 2, 12.
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