previous next
in-sĭmŭlo , āvi, ātum, 1, v. a.,
I.to make a plausible charge (true or false) against a person before a tribunal; to make suspected, charge, accuse, blame, esp. falsely; to invent a charge or bear false witness against (syn.: accuso, incuso, arguo).
3. With acc. and inf.: “queruntur, quod eos insimulemus omnia incerta dicere,Cic. Ac. 2, 10, 32: “insimulant hominem fraudandi causa discessisse,Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 24, § 59: “et quod illum durum insimulat, id non est,Ter. Heaut. 1, 2, 30; cf. in pass., with nom. and inf.: “rumore tenus insimulatus fovisse partes hostiles,Amm. 14, 5, 3: “Alcibiades absens insimulatur Athenis mysteria Cereris enuntiavisse,Just. 5, 1, 1.—
4. With two acc.: mirum'st sic (eum) me insimulare falso facinus tam malum, Flaut. Am. 2, 2, 229: “quod illum insimulat durum, id non est,Ter. Heaut. 1, 2, 30.—
5. With acc. of the charge alone: “non istuc quod tu insimulas,Plaut. Aul. 2, 4, 9 (Bothe and Wagner, quo): “istuc facinus, quod tu insimulas,id. Am. 2, 2, 188 Fleck.: “id quod ego injuratus insimulo,Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 41, § 107; 2, 5, 59, § 153: “aperta,id. Clu. 64, 180; cf.: “neque aliud quam patientia aut pudor, quod legato pepercisset, insimulari posset,Liv. 29, 20, 4. —
6. With abl. of manner: “fateri facinus insimulati falso crimine senatus,Liv. 6, 16, 1; Ov. H. 6, 21 (supra).
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: