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intrŏĭtus , ūs, m. introeo,
I.a going in or into, an entering, entrance (class.).
I. Lit.: “nocturnus introitus Zmyrnam quasi in hostium urbem,Cic. Phil. 11, 2, 5: “militum,Caes. B. C. 1, 21: “in urbem,id. Dom. 28: “sol in Geminos introitum facit,enters, Col. 11, 2, 43: “primo statim introitu,at his very first entrance, Tac. H. 1, 31: “aliquem introitu prohibere,Cic. Caecin. 13: “cujus in Graeciam,Just. 2, 11, 1: “introitum alicujus rei pellere,to keep a thing from entering, Plin. 20, 9, 39, § 101.—With in and abl. (rare): “sol introitum in Cancro facit,Col. 11, 2, 49.—
2. Esp., the mouth of a river, its entrance into another: “Averni,Sil. 13, 398; also as the entrance to it from the sea (cf. B. infra): “Indi,Plin. 12, 12, 25, § 41 al.
II. Trop.
A. An entering, entrance upon an office or into a society: “certum aliquid pro introitu dare,Plin. Ep. 10, 113: “sacerdotii,Suet. Claud. 9: “militiam illam cum introitu comparari volo,” i. e. entrancemoney, Dig. 32, 1, 102.—
B. A beginning, introduction, prelude (syn.: “principium, exordium, prooemium): fabulae Clodianae,Cic. Att. 1, 18: “defensionis,id. Cael. 2, 3: “in introitu hujus operis,Plin. 6, 27, 31, § 141.
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