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lābor , lapsus (
I.inf. parag. labier, Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 94; part. labundus, Att. ap. Non. 504, 31; Trag. Fragm. v. 570 Rib.), 3, v. dep. n. [cf. lăbo; Sanscr. lamb- (ramb-), to glide, fall], to move gently along a smooth surface, to fall, slide; to slide, slip, or glide down, to fall down, to sink as the beginning of a fall; constr. absol., or with ad, in, inter, per, sub, super, ab, de, ex, or with abl. alone.
I. Lit.
A. In gen.
B. Transf.
1. To glide away, glide along, slip or haste away: labitur uncta carina: volat super impetus undas, Enn. ap. Macr. S. 6, 1 (Ann. v. 379 Vahl.); so id. ap. Isid. Orig. 19, 1 (Ann. v. 476 Vahl.); cf.: “labitur uncta vadis abies,Verg. A. 8, 91; Cic. Ac. 1, 8, 31: “sidera, quae vaga et mutabili ratione labuntur,id. Univ. 10.—Esp., of a transition in discourse, to pass: “a dispositione ad elocutionis praecepta labor,Quint. 7, 10, 17.—
2. To slip away, escape: “lapsus custodiā,Tac. A. 5, 10; 11, 31: “e manibus custodientium lapsus,Curt. 3, 13, 3; Prop. 1, 11, 5; Amm. 26, 3, 3.—
II. Trop.
B. In partic.
1. Of speech, to die away, be lost, not be heard (very rare): “ne adjectae voces laberentur atque errarent,Cic. N. D. 2, 57, 114; cf. Sil. 7, 745.—
2. Of time, to glide, pass away, elapse: “eheu fugaces labuntur anni,Hor. C. 2, 14, 2: “anni tacite labentis origo,Ov. F. 1, 65: “labentia tempora,id. Tr. 3, 11; id. F. 6, 771; id. Tr. 4, 10, 27: “aetas labitur,Tib. 1, 8, 48; cf.: labente officio, when the attendance or service is ended, Juv. 6, 203.—
3. Pregn., to sink, incline, begin to fall, go to ruin, perish: quantis opibus, quibus de rebus lapsa fortuna accidat, Enn. ap. Cic. Tusc. 3, 19, 44 (Trag. v. 396 Vahl.); cf.: “cetera nasci, occidere, fluere, labi,Cic. Or. 3, 10: “labentem et prope cadentem rem publicam fulcire,id. Phil. 2, 21, 51: “equitem Romanum labentem excepit, fulsit, sustinuit,id. Rab. Post. 16, 43; id. Ep. ad Brut. 1, 18, 2: “sustinuit labentem aciem Antonius,Tac. H. 3, 23: “vidi labentes acies,Prop. 4 (5), 2, 53.eo citius lapsa res est,Liv. 3, 33: mores lapsi sunt, id. praef.; Tac. A. 6, 50: “fides lapsa,Ov. H. 2, 102: “labentur opes,will be lost, Tib. 1, 6, 53: “res,Lucr. 4, 1117: “hereditas lapsa est,Dig. 4, 4, 11, § 5.—
4. To slip or fall away from a thing, to lose it: hac spe lapsus, deceived or disappointed in this hope, Caes. B. G. 5, 55, 3: “hoc munere,Sil. 7, 740: “facultatibus,to lose one's property, become poor, Dig. 27, 8, 2, § 11; 26, 7, 9, § 1: “mente,to lose one's senses, go mad, Cels. 5, 26, 13; Suet. Aug. 48; cf.: “lapsae mentis error,Val. Max. 5, 3, 2.—Hence, lapsus , a, um, ruined, unfortunate, Prop. 1, 1, 25. —
5. To fall into or upon, to come or turn to: “labor eo, ut assentiar Epicuro,Cic. Ac. 2, 45, 139; id. Att. 4, 5, 2: “ad opinionem,id. Ac. 2, 45, 138: “in adulationem,Tac. A. 4, 6: “in gaudia,Val. Fl. 6, 662: “in vitium,Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 94.—
7. Esp., to fall away from the true faith, to become apostate (eccl. Lat.): “lapsorum fratrum petulantia,Cypr. Ep. 30, 1 al.
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