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mansĭo , ōnis, f. maneo,
I.a staying, remaining, stay, continuance.
I. Lit. (class.): “is saepe mecum de tua mansione, aut decessione communicat,Cic. Fam. 4, 4, 5: “mansio Formiis,id. Att. 9, 5, 1: “excessus e vita et in vita mansio,id. Fin. 3, 18, 60: “cautior certe est mansio,id. Att. 8, 15, 2: “diutinae Lemni,Ter. Phorm. 5, 8, 23: crebrae ad amicam, i. e. visits, Turp. ap. Non. 132, 16.—
II. Transf. (post-Aug.), a place of abode, a dwelling, habitation.
A. In gen.: “pecorum mansio,Plin. 18, 23, 53, § 194: “aestivae, hibernae, vernae, auctumnales,Pall. 1, 9, 5; 1, 12: “mansionem apud eum faciemus,Vulg. Joann. 14, 23: “multae mansiones,id. ib. 14, 2.—
B. Esp.
1. Night-quarters, lodging-place, inn; also, as a measure of days' journeys, a stopping or haltingplace, station: “deinde ad primam statim mansionem febrim nactus,Suet. Tib. 10: “a quo (monte) octo mansionibus distat regio, etc.,” i. e. stations, days' journeys, Plin. 12, 14, 30, § 52: “aquationum ratione mansionibus dispositis,id. 6, 23, 26, § 102: “continuatis mansionibus,Just. 13, 8, 5.—
2. Mala mansio, bad quarters, a kind of punishment in which the culprit was stretched out and tied fast to a board, Dig. 47, 10, 15; 16, 3, 7.
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