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offĭcĭōsus , a, um, adj. officium.
I. Full of courtcousness or complaisance, obliging, ready to serve (esp. towards one's superiors; class.; “syn. studiosus): homo,Cic. Fam. 13, 21, 2: “amicitia,id. Planc. 19, 46: “sedulitas,Hor. Ep. 1, 7, 8: “voluntas,Ov. P. 3, 2, 17.—Comp.: “estne quisquam, qui tibi officiosior, liberaliorque videatur?Cic. Rosc. Com. 6, 18; id. Att. 13, 45, 3.—Sup.: “officiosissima natio candidatorum,Cic. Pis. 23, 55; for which with summe: “homines Lampsaceni summe in omnes cives Romanos officiosi,Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 24, § 63.—
II. Dutiful, in accordance with duty: “dolor,Cic. Tusc. 3, 28, 70: “labores,id. Mil. 5, 12: “pietas,Sen. Ep. 99, 18.—
B. Subst.: offĭcĭō-sus , i, m., an official or attendant at a bath, Petr. 92.—Hence, adv.: offĭcĭōsē , courteously, obligingly (class.): “officiose et amice factum,Cic. Lael. 20, 81: aliquid facere, Afran. ap. Charis. p. 247 P.: “scribere,Cic. Att. 1, 20, 1.—Comp.: “gratum etiam Pilia (fecit), sed illa officiosius, quod, etc.,Cic. Att. 6, 1, 22.—Sup.: “officiosissime venit ad me,Plin. Ep. 10, 21 (32) init.
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