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prō-cēdo , cessi, cessum, 3, v. n.,
I.to go forth or before, to go forwards, advance, proceed (class.; cf.: progredior, prodeo).
I. Lit.
B. In partic.
1. In milit. lang., to go or march forwards, to advance, Caes. B. C. 3, 34: “lente atque paulatim proceditur,id. ib. 1, 80; id. B. G. 6, 25: “agmen procedit,Cic. Tusc. 2, 16, 37; Curt. 7, 3, 19: “processum in aciem est,Liv. 25, 21: “ipsi jam pridem avidi certaminis procedunt,id. 3, 62, 6.—Cf. of ships, Caes. B. G. 7, 61; Verg. A. 4, 587.—
2. Of processions, to go on, set forward, move on, advance, etc.: “funus interim Procedit: sequimur,Ter. And. 1, 1, 101; Hor. C. 4, 2, 49: “tacito procedens agmine,Sil. 7, 91: “vidisti Latios consul procedere fasces,id. 6, 443.—
C. Transf.
1. To go or come forth or out, to advance, issue: “foribus foras procedere,Plaut. Ps. 2, 2, 12: “castris,Verg. A. 12, 169: “extra munitiones,Caes. B. G 5, 43: “in medium,Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 36, § 94: “e tabernaculo in solem,id. Brut. 9, 37: “in pedes procedere nascentem, contra naturam est,to be born feet first, Plin. 7, 8, 6, § 45: “mediā procedit ab aulā,Ov. M. 14, 46.—
b. In gen., to show one's self, to appear: “cum veste purpureā procedere,Cic. Div. 1, 52, 119: “obviam alicui procedere,to go towards, go to meet, id. Sest. 13, 68; cf.: “Jugurthae obvius procedit,Sall. J. 21, 1: “obviam,id. ib. 53, 5: “procedat vel Numa,Juv. 3, 138.—
c. In partic., to issue from the mouth, to be uttered: “sed interdum voces procedebant contumaces et inconsultae,Tac. A. 4, 60 init.; Vulg. 1 Cor. 14, 36.—
d. Of stars, etc., to rise, come into view: “Ecce Dionaei processit Caesaris astrum,Verg. E. 9, 47: “vesper,id. ib. 6, 86.—
e. Of the moon, to wax, increase, Pall. 7, 3.—
2. Of plants, to put forth, spring forth, grow (ante-class. and in post-Aug. prose): “antequam radices longius procedere possint,Varr. R. R. 1, 23, 5: “plerumque germen de cicatrice procedit,Col. 4, 22, 4: “gemma sine dubio processura,Pall. 7, 5, 3; 8, 3, 1 et saep.—
II. Trop.
B. To come or go forth, to appear, to present or show one's self (poet. and post-Aug.): “nunc volo subducto gravior procedere voltu,” i. e. to conduct myself more gravely, to undertake more serious matters, Prop. 2, 10 (3, 1), 9: “quis postea ad summam Thucydidis, quis Hyperidis ad famam processit?Petr. 2.—
2. In partic., to go or get on, to advance, make progress (class.; cf. “proficio): dicendi laude multum,Cic. Brut. 36, 137: “in philosophiā,id. Fin. 3, 2, 6: “honoribus longius,id. Brut. 48, 180; cf. id. Har. Resp. 23, 48: “ad virtutis aditum,id. Fin. 3, 14, 48: “ambitio et procedendi libido,a passion for getting on, for rising in the world, Plin. Ep 8, 6, 3: “longius iras,Verg. A. 5, 461: “perspicuum est, quo compositiones unguentorum processerint,to what extent, how far, Cic. N. D. 2, 58, 146: “ut ratione et viā procedat oratio,id. Fin. 1, 9, 29: “eo vecordiae processit, ut,went so far in folly, Sall. J. 5, 2: “Adherbal, ubi intellegit eo processum,id. ib. 21, 1; so, “processit in id furoris,Vell. 2, 80, 2: “eoque ira processit, ut, etc.,Liv. 9, 26, 2: “ex infimā fortunā in ordinem senatorium, et ad summos honores,Suet. Rhet. 1, 10.—
C. To run on, continue, remain: “et cum stationes procederent, prope obruentibus infirmum corpus armis,” i. e. guard duty returned so frequently as to seem continuous, Liv. 5, 48, 7: “ut iis stipendia procederent,id. 25, 5, 8; 27, 11, 14; cf. “aera,id. 5, 7, 12.—
D. To go on, continue, follow; esp. of speech, etc.: “ad dissuadendum,Liv. 30, 35; cf. Plaut. Am. prol. 117: non imitor λακωνισμὸν tuum: “altera jam pagella procedit,Cic. Fam. 11, 25, 2.—
2. To turn out favorably for, to result in favor of, to benefit, be of use to one: “totidem dies emptori procedent,Cato, R. R. 148: “benefacta mea reipublicae procedunt,Sall. J. 85, 5; Ov. H. 9, 109.—
3. To be effectual: “venenum non processerat,Tac. A. 15, 60: “medicina processit,Col. 6, 6, 4.—
F. To go or pass for, to be counted or reckoned as any thing (anteand post-class.): “ut binae (oves) pro singulis procedant,shall be reckoned as one, Varr. R. R. 2, 2, 5; Dig. 5, 3, 32: “quod ita procedit, si ea, cui donabatur, eum interposuit,ib. 24, 1, 11.—
G. To happen, take place, occur (ante-class.): “numquid processit ad forum hodie novi?Plaut. Most. 4, 3, 7.—
H. To come or proceed from, to be derived from (post-class.): “res, quae a sacratissimis imperatoribus procedunt,Cod. Just. 7, 37, 3.— In part. pass.: “in processā aetate,advanced, Scrib. Comp. 100.
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