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prōvĭdentĭa , ae, f. provideo.
II. Foresight, forethought, forecast, precaution, providence (cf. prudentia): “deorum providentiā mundum administrari,Cic. Div. 1, 51, 117; cf. id. N. D. 1, 8, 18; 2, 22, 58; Quint. 11, 1, 23: “alterum ex providentiā timorem afferre solet,Sall. J. 7, 5: “plurimum tibi et usus et providentiae superest,Plin. Ep. 3, 19, 9: “jam te providentia deorum primum in locum provexerat,id. Pan. 10, 4.—With object. gen.: “neque feriendi neque declinandi providentia,Tac. H. 4, 29: “providentia filiorum suorum,Dig. 33, 1, 7 fin.—In plur.: “agnosce bonitatem dei ex providentiis,Tert. adv. Marc. 2, 4 fin.
B. Transf.
1. The government of the world by infinite wisdom and foresight, providence (post-class.): “tua, Pater, providentia gubernat,Vulg. Sap. 14, 3; id. Act. 24, 2.—
2. Providence, as a designation of the Deity (post-Aug.): “vis illum (deum) providentiam dicere? recte dices,Sen. Q. N. 2, 45, 2: “oratio, quā nihil praestantius homini dedit providentia,Quint. 1, 10, 7; 1, 12, 19; 6 praef. § 4; 5, 12, 19; 10, 1, 109; 12, 1, 2; App. M. 6, p. 179, 12.—
3. Providentia, Providence, personified as a goddess, a transl. of the Gr. Πρόνοια, Macr. S. 1, 17.
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