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pectus , ŏris, n. kindred with the Sanscr. vakshas, pectus,
I.the breast, in men and animals.
I. Lit., the breast, the breastbone: “pectus, hoc est ossa praecordiis et vitalibus natura circumdedit,Plin. 11, 37, 82, § 207; cf. Cels. 8, 7 fin.; 8, 8, 2: “meum cor coepit in pectus emicare,Plaut. Aul. 4, 3, 4: “dignitas, quae est in latitudine pectoris,Quint. 11, 3, 141: “summis digitis pectus appetere,id. 11, 3, 124; 11, 3, 122: “pectore adverso,id. 2, 15, 7: “aequo pectore,upright, not inclined to one side, id. 11, 3, 125: “pectore in adverso ensem Condidit,Verg. A. 9, 347: “in pectusque cadit pronus,Ov. M. 4, 578: “latum demisit pectore clavum,Hor. S. 1, 6, 28; 2, 8, 90 et saep.; Vulg. Gen. 3, 14.—In the poets freq., in plur., of a person's breast: hasta volans perrumpit pectora ferro, Liv. Andron. ap. Prisc. p. 760 P.; Ov. M. 4, 554.—
II. Transf.
A. The stomach (poet.): “reserato pectore diras Egerere inde dapes ... gestit,Ov. M. 6, 663.—
B. The breast.
3. The person, individual, regarded as a being of feeling or passion: “cara sororum Pectora,Verg. A. 11, 216: “mihi Thesea pectora juncta fide,Ov. Tr. 1, 3, 66: “pectus consulis gerere,Liv. 4, 13; cf. Mart. 9, 15; Manil. 2, 600; Stat. S. 4, 4, 103.
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