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pons , ntis, m. kindred with Sanscr. pathi, a path; Gr. πάτος; old Germ. phat, pfat; mod. Germ. Pfad; Angl.-Sax. padh; hence prop. a board across a ditch, brook, etc.,
I.a bridge across a river, ditch, or marsh, between towers, etc.
I. In gen.: “pars oppidi mari disjuncta angusto, ponte rursus adjungitur et continetur,Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 52, § “117: pontem in Arare faciendum curat,to throw a bridge over the stream, Caes. B. G. 1, 13: in Isarā, flumine maximo, ponte uno die facto, Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 15, 3: “in Histro flumine,Nep. Milt. 3, 1; so, “inicere pontem,Liv. 26, 6; Tac. A. 15, 19: “flumen ponte jungere,Liv. 21, 45; Curt. 3, 7, 1: “amnem ponte junxit,id. 4, 9, 9: “imponere pontem flumini,id. 5, 1, 22: “pontibus palude constratā,Hirt. B. G. 8, 14: “pontem navibus efficere,Tac. A. 6, 37: “ponte flumen transgredi,id. ib. 13, 39; “also: ponte flumen transmittere,Plin. Ep. 8, 8; and: “ponte flumen traicere,Flor. 4, 12, 22: “interscindere pontem,to break down, Cic. Leg. 2, 4, 10; also, “rescindere,Nep. Milt. 3, 4: “interrumpere,Plaut. Cas. prol. 66; Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 23, 3: “rumpere,Quint. 2, 13, 16; Tac. A. 2, 68: “abrumpere,id. H. 3, 6: “recidere,Curt. 4, 16, 8: “solvere,Tac. A. 1, 69: “dissolvere,Nep. Them. 5, 1: “vellere,Verg. A. 8, 650: “partem pontis rescindere,Caes. B. G. 6, 29.—Esp., as a stand for beggars, Juv. 5, 8; cf. id. 4, 116: “aliquis de ponte,” i. e. a beggar, id. 14, 134.—Plur.: “plures dies efficiendis pontibus absumpti,a bridge of several spans, Tac. A. 2, 8; 11, 13; Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 23, 3; cf. id. ib. 10, 18, 4.—
II. In partic.
A. The bridge at the Comitia, over which the voters passed one by one to the septum, to deposit their votes, Cic. Att. 1, 14, 5; Auct. Her. 1, 12, 21; Ov. F. 5, 634. Hence the proverb: sexagenarios de ponte; v. sexagenarius.—
B. A wooden drawbridge, to be let down from besieging towers to the walls of a town or fortress, Tac. A. 4, 51; Suet. Aug. 20.—
C. A plank bridge thrown from a vessel to the shore, Verg. A. 10, 288 and 654; Liv. 21, 28.—
D. The deck of a ship on which the military engines were placed, Tac. A. 2, 6.—
E. A floor of a tower, Verg. A. 9, 530; 12, 675.—
F. A wooden bridge on a narrow wall between two towers, Verg. A. 9, 170.
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