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rāmus , i, m. for rad-mus; Sanscr. root vardh, crescere; cf.: radix, radius,
I.a branch, bough, twig (cf.: surculus, termes).
I. Lit.: “in quibus (arboribus) non truncus, non rami, non folia sunt denique, nisi, etc.,Cic. de Or. 3, 46, 179; Enn. ap. Cic. Tusc. 1, 28, 69 (Trag. v. 194 Vahl.): “qui praetereuntes ramum defringerent arboris,Cic. Caecin. 21, 60: “sub ramis arboris,Lucr. 2, 30; 5, 1393: “decidere falcibus ramos,id. 5, 936 et saep.: “tempora cingite ramis,Verg. A. 5, 71; 8, 286; Val. Fl. 6, 296; Hor. C. 2, 15, 9; id. S. 1, 5, 81: “ingens ramorum umbra,Verg. G. 2, 489; id. A. 6, 808.—Poet., for a tree, Verg. A. 3, 650; for the fruit of trees, id. ib. 8, 318; in partic., for frankincense twigs, Claud. III. Cons. Hon. 211. —
B. Transf., of things having a branching form.
1. A branch of a stag's antlers, Caes. B. G. 6, 26, 2.—
2. A spur of a mountain chain, Plin. 6, 27, 31, § 134. —
4. = membrum virile, Nov. ap. Non. 116, 26.—
5. An arm or mouth of a river: “multos ignobiles ramos porrigit (Nilus),Sen. Q. N. 4, 2, 11.—
6. A branch or arm of the Greek letter γ, used by Pythagoras as a symbol of the two paths of life, leading to virtue and vice, Aus. Idyll. 12, 9; “hence called Samii rami,Pers. 3, 56.—
II. Trop., a branch: “ramos amputare miseriarum,Cic. Tusc. 3, 6, 13: “fortitudo, cujus patientia et perpessio et tolerantia rami sunt,Sen. Ep. 67, 10.—Of a branch of consanguinity, Pers. 3, 28.
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