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-cēdo , cessi, cessum, 3, v. n.,
I.to go back, fall back, give ground, retire, withdraw, recede.
2. In partic., to retire to one's bedchamber, go to rest, Petr. 85, 5; Ov. Ib. 239.—
B. Transf.
1. Of inanimate and abstract things: “ut illae undae ad alios accedant, ab aliis autem recedant,Cic. Planc. 6, 15: “verba movere loco, quamvis invita recedant,yield, Hor. Ep. 2, 2, 113: “multa ferunt anni venientes commoda secum, Multa recedentes adimunt,the departing years, id. A. P. 176: “abeant ac recedant voces illae,Plin. Pan. 2, 2.—
II. In gen., to go away, withdraw, retire, depart from a place, to abandon a thing, = discedere.
A. Lit. (in good prose very rare), = discedere, haec effatu' pater, germana, repente recessit, vanished, Enn. ap. Cic. Div. 1, 20, 40 (Ann. v. 48 Vahl.): “nec vero a stabulis pluviā impendente recedunt Longius (apes),Verg. G. 4, 191; Plin. Ep. 1, 13, 2.—
2. Transf., of things, to separate from any thing (with which it was previously connected): “in aliis ossibus ex toto saepe fragmentum a fragmento recedit,Cels. 8, 7, 1: “carnes ab ossibus,Plin. 22, 8, 9, § 22; 19, 5, 23, § 67: “caput e cervice,Ov. P. 2, 8, 65; “for which also: caput cervice,id. H. 16, 153; cf. id. F. 6, 708; Luc. 8, 674. —
B. Trop., to withdraw, depart, desist (class.; esp. freq. in Cic. and Quint.): si quid vos per laborem recte feceritis, labor ille a vobis cito recedet, Cato ap. Gell. 16, 1, 4: “avius a verā longe ratione recedit,Lucr. 2, 229: “senes, ut in otia tuta recedant, aiunt, etc.,Hor. S. 1, 1, 31: “ab officio recedere,Cic. Off. 3, 4, 19; Auct. Her. 3, 3, 5; Cic. Caecin. 20, 58: “ab armis,” i. e. to lay them down, id. Rosc. Am. 6, 16: “penitus a naturā,id. Fin. 4, 16, 43: “ab eodem exemplo,Quint. 1, 6, 6; 2, 8, 13; 7, 3, 21: “a sententiis ejus, ab omni voluntate, consiliisque,Cic. Att. 12, 4, 2: a vitā, i. e. to kill one's self, id. Tusc. 4, 17, 40 (but Plin. 29, 1, 5, § 6, to die, in gen., a doubtful conjecture; Jahn, procedente vitā): “a veritatis viā longe,Lact. 2, 8, 1: “ab oppugnatione,Hirt. B. G. 8, 40.—Very freq. of inanimate and abstract subjects: “postquam recessit vita patrio corpore,Plaut. Merc. prol. 73: “(nomen hostis) a peregrino recessit et proprie in eo, qui arma contra ferret, remansit,has lost the signification of foreigner, Cic. Off. 1, 12, 37; so, “res a consuetudine,id. Quint. 21, 67; Quint. 2, 13, 11: “figurae sententiarum ab illo simplici modo indicandi recedunt,id. 9, 2, 1: “ab usu cotidiano,id. 10, 1, 44 et saep.—Poet., with simple abl.: “sic nunquam corde recedit Nata tuo,departs, Stat. S. 3, 5, 55.—Absol., to vanish, pass away, disappear: “et pariter Phoebes, pariter maris ira recessit,Ov. M. 12, 36: “spes,Luc. 7, 688: “quonam nostri tibi cura recessit?Verg. A. 2, 595: “fortuna recessit,id. ib. 3, 53.— With in: “in ventos vita recessit,passed away into the winds, Verg. A. 4, 705.— Hence, * rĕcessus , a, um, P. a. (acc. to I. B.), drawn back, receding: “scaena recessior,standing farther back, Vitr. 5, 8.
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