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rĕcĭdo , reccidi (better than recidi; cf. Cic. Rep. 2, 8, 14), cāsum (recasurus, Cic. Att. 4, 16, 12; Suet. Aug. 96; Gai. Inst. 1, 127), 3 (with
I.e long, Lucr. 1, 857; 1063; 5, 280; Prop. 4 (5), 8, 44; Ov. M. 6, 212; 10, 18; 180; id. R. Am. 611; Juv. 12, 54; Phaedr. 3, 18, 15 al.; “prob., also,Plaut. Men. 3, 2, 54, and Ter. Hec. prol. alt. 39; v. the art. re), v. n., to fall back (class., and very freq., esp. in the trop. signif.; but not found in Virg. or Hor.).
II. (With the idea of cadere predominating.) To fall somewhere, to light upon, happen, occur, = redigi; constr. with ad, in, or an adv. of direction.
(α). With ad: “ex laetitiā et voluptate ad ludum et lacrimas,Cic. Sull. 32, 91: ex liberatore patriae ad Aquilios se Vitelliosque reccidisse, had sunk to a level with the Aquilii and Vitellii, i. e. had come to be regarded as a traitor, Liv. 2, 7: sinere artem musicam Recidere ad paucos, to fall into the possession of a few, Ter. Hec. prol. alt. 39: “tantum apparatum ad nihilum recidere,to come to naught, Cic. Phil. 7, 9, 27: “ad nilum,Lucr. 1, 857; Cic. Or. 70, 233: “ad nihil,id. Att. 4, 16, 12.—
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